Publications by authors named "Hye Jeong Kong"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Intracellular delivery of oxaliplatin conjugate via cell penetrating peptide for the treatment of colorectal carcinoma in vitro and in vivo.

Int J Pharm 2021 Sep 19;606:120904. Epub 2021 Jul 19.

Department of Electronic Materials and Devices Engineering, Soonchunhyang University, Asan 31538, Republic of Korea; Department of Chemical Engineering, Soonchunhyang University, Asan 31538, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

Pt-based drugs are one of the main active agents in colorectal cancer treatment. However, drug resistance and dose-dependent side effects are the main barriers that restrict their clinical applications. As an alternative approach to these issues, we designed and synthesized a cell penetrating peptide (CPP) octaarginine-oxaliplatin conjugate that quickly and successfully delivered oxaliplatin into colon cancer cells. The CPP octaarginine is a well-studied cationic peptide that can play a role as a drug delivery vector. In this work, an octaarginine CPP (RRRRRRRR) was conjugated with oxaliplatin via a specific heterobifunctional linker. The in vitro studies showed the conjugate had affinity toward mitochondria inside cells and the MTT assay confirmed that conjugate is active in low micromolar range against colon cancer cells, requiring much lower concentrations than the oxaliplatin alone to reach IC. More importantly, in the in vivo mouse study, the conjugate effectively inhibited tumor growth and showed considerably high antitumor activity, demonstrating the conjugate can perform well in vivo. This strategy may offer a new approach for designing oxaliplatin derivatives or prodrugs with remarkable therapeutic capabilities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpharm.2021.120904DOI Listing
September 2021

Nanostructured mesophase electrode materials: modulating charge-storage behavior by thermal treatment.

Nanoscale 2017 Nov;9(44):17450-17458

Department of Polymer Engineering, Graduate School, Chonnam National University, 77 Yongbong-ro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 61186, South Korea.

3D nanostructured carbonaceous electrode materials with tunable capacitive phases were successfully developed using graphene/particulate polypyrrole (PPy) nanohybrid (GPNH) precursors without a separate process for incorporating heterogeneous species. The electrode material, namely carbonized GPNHs (CGPNHs) featured a mesophase capacitance consisting of both electric double-layer (EDL) capacitive and pseudocapacitive elements at the molecular level. The ratio of EDL capacitive element to pseudocapacitive element (E-to-P) in the mesophase electrode materials was controlled by varying the PPy-to-graphite weight (P/G) ratio and by heat treatment (T), which was demonstrated by characterizing the CGPNHs with elemental analysis, cyclic voltammetry, and a charge/discharge test. The concept of the E-to-P ratio (EPR) index was first proposed to easily identify the capacitive characteristics of the mesophase electrode using a numerical algorithm, which was reasonably consistent with the experimental findings. Finally, the CGPNHs were integrated into symmetric two-electrode capacitor cells, which rendered excellent energy and power densities in both aqueous and ionic liquid electrolytes. It is anticipated that our approach could be widely extended to fabricating versatile hybrid electrode materials with estimation of their capacitive characteristics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c7nr05842jDOI Listing
November 2017

Graphene-Embedded Hydrogel Nanofibers for Detection and Removal of Aqueous-Phase Dyes.

ACS Appl Mater Interfaces 2017 Mar 16;9(12):10768-10776. Epub 2017 Mar 16.

BioNanotechnology Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB) , Daejeon 34141, South Korea.

A facile route to graphene/polymer hydrogel nanofibers was developed. An aqueous dispersion of graphene (containing >40% bilayer graphene flakes) stabilized by a functionalized water-soluble polymer with phenyl side chains was successfully electrospun to yield nanofibers. Subsequent vapor-phase cross-linking of the nanofibers produced graphene-embedded hydrogel nanofibers (GHNFs). Interestingly, the GHNFs showed chemical sensitivity to the cationic dyes methylene blue (MB) and crystal violet (CV) in the aqueous phase. The adsorption capacities were as high as 0.43 and 0.33 mmol g s for MB and CV, respectively, even in a 1.5 mL s flow system. A density functional theory calculation revealed that aqueous-phase MB and CV dyes were oriented parallel to the graphene surface and that the graphene/dye ensembles were stabilized by secondary physical bonding mechanisms such as the π-π stacking interaction in an aqueous medium. The GHNFs exhibited electrochemical properties arising mainly from the electric double-layer capacitance, which were applied in a demonstration of GHNF-based membrane electrodes (5 cm in diameter) for detecting the dyes in the flow system. It is believed that the GHNF membrane can be a successful model candidate for commercialization of graphene due to its easy-to-fabricate process and remarkable properties.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsami.7b01163DOI Listing
March 2017

Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Conducting-Polymer Nanotubes as Highly Sensitive Nerve-Agent Chemiresistors.

Sci Rep 2016 09 21;6:33724. Epub 2016 Sep 21.

Department of Polymer Engineering, Graduate School, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186, South Korea.

Organophosphates are powerful inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase, which is critical to nerve function. Despite continuous research for detecting the highly toxic organophosphates, a new and improved methodology is still needed. Herein we demonstrate simple-to-fabricate chemiresistive gas sensors using conducting-polymer polypyrrole (PPy) nanotube transducers, which are chemically specific and capable of recognizing sub-ppb concentrations (ca. 0.5 ppb) of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a simulant of nerve agent sarin. Interestingly, the introduction of carboxylic groups on the surface of PPy nanotube transistors resulted in enhanced sensitivity to DMMP via intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Furthermore, it was found that the sensitivity of the nanotube transducer depended on the degree of the carboxylic group introduced. Finally, a sensor array composed of 5 different transducers including the carboxylated nanotubes exhibited excellent selectivity to DMMP in 16 vapor species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep33724DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5030647PMC
September 2016

The effect of nanoparticle packing on capacitive electrode performance.

Nanoscale 2016 Jun;8(23):11940-8

Department of Polymer Engineering, Graduate School, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186, South Korea and School of Polymer Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186, South Korea.

Nanoparticles pack together to form macro-scale electrodes in various types of devices, and thus, optimization of the nanoparticle packing is a prerequisite for the realization of a desirable device performance. In this work, we provide in-depth insight into the effect of nanoparticle packing on the performance of nanoparticle-based electrodes by combining experimental and computational findings. As a model system, polypyrrole nanospheres of three different diameters were used to construct pseudocapacitive electrodes, and the performance of the electrodes was examined at various nanosphere diameter ratios and mixed weight fractions. Two numerical algorithms are proposed to simulate the random packing of the nanospheres on the electrode. The binary nanospheres exhibited diverse, complicated packing behaviors compared with the monophasic packing of each nanosphere species. The packing of the two nanosphere species with lower diameter ratios at an optimized composition could lead to more dense packing of the nanospheres, which in turn could contribute to better device performance. The dense packing of the nanospheres would provide more efficient transport pathways for ions because of the reduced inter-nanosphere pore size and enlarged surface area for charge storage. Ultimately, it is anticipated that our approach can be widely used to define the concept of "the best nanoparticle packing" for desirable device performance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c6nr02424fDOI Listing
June 2016
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