Publications by authors named "Hung Manh Pham"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Cost-Effectiveness of Ticagrelor Compared with Clopidogrel in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome from Vietnamese Healthcare Payers' Perspective.

Adv Ther 2021 Jul 11;38(7):4026-4039. Epub 2021 Jun 11.

AstraZeneca Medical Affairs, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

Introduction: The PLATelet inhibition and patient Outcomes (PLATO) trial (NCT00391872) demonstrated that ticagrelor compared to clopidogrel significantly reduced the rate of death from cardiovascular causes, myocardial infarction or stroke in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The aim of this study is to analyze the long-term cost-effectiveness of ticagrelor compared to clopidogrel in ACS patients from a Vietnamese healthcare payers' perspective.

Methods: A two-part cost-effectiveness model was developed to estimate long-term costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALY). Cardiovascular event rates, hospital bed days, interventions, investigations, study drug utilization and EuroQol 5 Dimension (EQ-5D) data were derived from the PLATO trial. Unit costs of medical services were derived from the Vietnamese governmental price list, and drug costs were based on the weighted average price from the Vietnamese social security report (in VND; 10.000 VND = 0.405 USD). An annual discount rate of 3% was used. Probabilistic and deterministic sensitivity analyses were conducted to evaluate uncertainty of the results.

Results: Ticagrelor was associated with an incremental cost of VND 5.34 million (USD 216.49) and a QALY gain of 0.11. This resulted in a cost per QALY gained of VND 49.58 million (USD 2009.96) from the Vietnamese healthcare payers' perspective. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis indicates that ticagrelor has 59% probability of being cost-effective compared with clopidogrel when using a willingness-to-pay threshold of one gross domestic products (GDP) per capita. Deterministic sensitivity analysis using clinical outcomes from the Asian sub-population of PLATO resulted in a cost per QALY of VND 42.25 million (USD 1712.80).

Conclusion: Ticagrelor can be considered a cost-effective treatment for ACS compared with clopidogrel from a Vietnamese healthcare payers' perspective.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12325-021-01743-5DOI Listing
July 2021

Sex differences in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement in Asia.

Open Heart 2021 01;8(1)

Department of Cardiology, Sichuan University West China Hospital, Chengdu, China.

Objectives: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is increasingly performed. Physically small Asians have smaller aortic root and peripheral vessel anatomy. The influence of gender of Asian patients undergoing TAVR is unknown and may affect outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess sex differences in Asian patients undergoing TAVR.

Methods: Patients undergoing TAVR from eight countries were enrolled. In this retrospective analysis, we examined differences in characteristics, 30-day clinical outcomes and 1-year survival between female and male Asian patients.

Results: Eight hundred and seventy-three patients (54.4% women) were included. Women were older, smaller and had less coronary artery and lung disease but tended to have higher logistic EuroSCOREs. Smaller prostheses were used more often in women. Major vascular complications occurred more frequently in women (5.5% vs 1.8%, p<0.01); however, 30-day stroke and mortality (women vs men: 1.5% vs 1.6%, p=0.95% and 4.3% vs 3.4%, p=0.48) were similar. Functional status improvement was significant and comparable between the sexes. Conduction disturbance and permanent pacemaker requirements (11.2% vs 9.0%, p=0.52) were also similar as was 1-year survival (women vs men: 85.6% vs 88.2%, p=0.25). The only predictors of 30-day mortality were major vascular injury in women and age in men.

Conclusions: Asian women had significantly smaller stature and anatomy with some differences in clinical profiles. Despite more frequent major vascular complications, women had similar 30-day stroke or mortality rates. Functional status improvement was significant and comparable between the sexes. Conduction disturbance and permanent pacemaker requirements were similar as was 1-year survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/openhrt-2020-001541DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7798412PMC
January 2021

Unraveling the history of the genus Gallus through whole genome sequencing.

Mol Phylogenet Evol 2021 05 17;158:107044. Epub 2020 Dec 17.

Université Paris Saclay, INRAE, AgroParisTech, GABI, 78350 Jouy-en-Josas, France.

The genus Gallus is distributed across a large part of Southeast Asia and has received special interest because the domestic chicken, Gallus gallus domesticus, has spread all over the world and is a major protein source for humans. There are four species: the red junglefowl (G. gallus), the green junglefowl (G. varius), the Lafayette's junglefowl (G. lafayettii) and the grey junglefowl (G. sonneratii). The aim of this study is to reconstruct the history of these species by a whole genome sequencing approach and resolve inconsistencies between well supported topologies inferred using different data and methods. Using deep sequencing, we identified over 35 million SNPs and reconstructed the phylogeny of the Gallus genus using both distance (BioNJ) and maximum likelihood (ML) methods. We observed discrepancies according to reconstruction methods and genomic components. The two most supported topologies were previously reported and were discriminated by using phylogenetic and gene flow analyses, based on ABBA statistics. Terminology fix requested by the deputy editor led to support a scenario with G. gallus as the earliest branching lineage of the Gallus genus, instead of G. varius. We discuss the probable causes for the discrepancy. A likely one is that G. sonneratii samples from parks or private collections are all recent hybrids, with roughly 10% of their autosomal genome originating from G. gallus. The removal of those regions is needed to provide reliable data, which was not done in previous studies. We took care of this and additionally included two wild G. sonneratii samples from India, showing no trace of introgression. This reinforces the importance of carefully selecting and validating samples and genomic components in phylogenomics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2020.107044DOI Listing
May 2021

Mahseers genera Tor and Neolissochilus (Teleostei: Cyprinidae) from southern Vietnam.

Zootaxa 2015 Aug 25;4006(3):551-68. Epub 2015 Aug 25.

Research Institute for Aquaculture No 3, 33 Đặng Tất, Nha Trang, Khánh Hòa, Vietnam; Email: unknown.

Two new species and two new basin records of mahseers in the genera Tor and Neolissochilus are described from the upper Krong No and middle Đồng Nai drainages of the Langbiang Plateau in southern Vietnam. These new species and new records are known from streams and rivers in montane mixed pine and evergreen forests between 140 and 1112 m. Their populations are isolated in the Sre Pok River of the Mekong basin, the middle of the Đồng Nai basin, and the An Lão River. Both new species are differentiated from their congeners by a combination of the following characters: 23-24 lateral scales, 9-10 predorsal scales, 2/7 or 1/8 pelvic-fin rays, mouth position, median lobe of lower lip, rostral hood, colour in life and by divergent mitochondrial DNA. Tor mekongensis sp. nov. is differentiated from Tor dongnaiensis sp. nov. by the number of transverse scale rows (3/1/2 vs. 4/1/2), number of pelvic-fin rays (2/7 vs. 1/8), a blunt rostral hood vs. pointed, caudal-fin lobes that are equal vs. unequal, and by mitochondrial DNA (0.7% sequence divergence). Molecular evidence identifies both species as members of the genus Tor and distinct from all congeners sampled (uncorrected sequence divergences >1.9% for all Tor species for which homologous COI sequences are available). Tor sinensis is recorded in the Krong No and the Sre Pok rivers, further south of its known distribution. Polymorphism is described in Neolissochilus stracheyi with a Tor-like morph and a Neolissochilus-like morph.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4006.3.8DOI Listing
August 2015

Two new species of shovel-jaw carp Onychostoma (Teleostei: Cyprinidae) from southern Vietnam.

Zootaxa 2015 May 22;3962:123-38. Epub 2015 May 22.

Viet Nam National University Ho Chi Minh city-University of Science, Faculty of Biology, 227 Nguyen Van Cu, District 5, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.; Email: unknown.

Two new species of large shovel-jaw carps in the genus Onychostoma are described from the upper Krong No and middle Dong Nai drainages of the Langbiang Plateau in southern Vietnam. These new species are known from streams in montane mixed pine and evergreen forests between 140 and 1112 m. Their populations are isolated in the headwaters of the upper Sre Pok River of the Mekong basin and in the middle of the Dong Nai basin. Both species are differentiated from their congeners by a combination of the following characters: transverse mouth opening width greater than head width, 14-17 predorsal scales, caudal-peduncle length 3.9-4.2 times in SL, no barbels in adults and juveniles, a strong serrated last simple ray of the dorsal fin, and small eye diameter (20.3-21.5% HL). Onychostoma krongnoensis sp. nov. is differentiated from Onychostoma dongnaiensis sp. nov. by body depth (4.0 vs. 3.2 times in SL), predorsal scale number (14-17 vs. 14-15), dorsal-fin length (4.5 vs. 4.2 times in SL), caudal-peduncle length (3.9 vs. 4.2 times in SL), colour in life (dark vs. bright), and by mitochondrial DNA (0.2% sequence divergence). Molecular evidence indicates that both species are members of Onychostoma and are distinct from all congeners sampled (uncorrected sequence divergences at the 16S rRNA gene of >2.0% for all Onychostoma for which homologous 16S rRNA sequences are available).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3962.1.6DOI Listing
May 2015
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