Publications by authors named "Humairat H Rahman"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Association of urinary arsenic and sleep disorder in the US population: NHANES 2015-2016.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2021 Aug 22. Epub 2021 Aug 22.

College of Nursing and Public Health, Adelphi University, One South Avenue, Garden City, NY, 11530, USA.

Arsenic is a known carcinogen and neurotoxin and is found in the natural earth crust. Arsenic exposure can develop depression, memory dysfunction, and neurodegenerative disorder. The mechanism of arsenic toxicity on the nervous system is not known. There is a lack of research on the association between arsenic exposure and sleep disturbance in humans. This study aims to investigate the relationship between six types of urinary speciated arsenic exposure and sleep disturbance in adults from the general population using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2015-2016 dataset. Sleep disturbance was measured using self-reported questionnaires, asking participants if they had ever told a doctor they had trouble sleeping. We utilized multivariate logistic regression analysis using complex survey procedures to examine the association between six types of urinary arsenic concentration and trouble sleeping. The total sample included 1,611 adults who were 20 years and older. Of the study participants, 30.0% had trouble sleeping. Compared to individuals with urinary arsenous acid below the lower level of detection (LLOD), those with urinary arsenous acid at or above the detection limit had lower odds of trouble sleeping [odds ratio: 0.72 (95% confidence interval 0.51-1.00, p-value: 0.05)]. The other five types of urinary speciated arsenic studied (arsenic acid, arsenobetaine, arsenocholine, dimethylarsinic acid, monomethylarsonic acid) were not associated with a sleep disorder. More studies are required to confirm or refute these findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-021-16085-6DOI Listing
August 2021

Environmental exposure to metals and the risk of high blood pressure: a cross-sectional study from NHANES 2015-2016.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2021 Jul 31. Epub 2021 Jul 31.

Data Forward Analytics, LLC, Las Cruces, NM, USA.

Exposure to metal pollution can be caused from inhalation, ingestion, or absorption from air, water, or food. Chronic exposure to trace amounts of metals can lead to high blood pressure, or hypertension, and other chronic diseases. The rationale of our study was to determine if there was a correlation between nineteen forms of urinary metal concentrations and high blood pressure, defined as ≥ 130 mm Hg systolic or ≥ 80 mm Hg diastolic, in the adult US population, to understand the possible impacts of metal exposure on humans. Five types of urinary arsenic species and fourteen types of urinary metals were studied to examine their correlation with high blood pressure. We used the dataset from the 2015-2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) for the study. A specialized complex survey design analysis package was used in analyzing the NHANES data. We used pairwise t tests and the logit regression models to study the correlation between urinary arsenic (five types) and urinary metal (fourteen types) concentrations and high blood pressure. The total study population analyzed included 4037 adults aged 20 years and older, of whom 57.9% of males and 51.7% of females had high blood pressure. Urinary arsenous acid (OR: 2.053, 95% CI: 1.045, 4.035), tin (OR: 1.983, 95% CI: 1.169, 3.364), and cesium (OR: 2.176, 95% CI: 1.013, 4.675) were associated with increased odds of high blood pressure. The other four types of urinary arsenic and twelve types of urinary metals were not associated with high blood pressure. Our results determined that exposure to environmental metals such as arsenous acid, tin, and cesium can be associated with high blood pressure. Further investigation is suggested to support our findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-021-15726-0DOI Listing
July 2021

Urinary speciated arsenic and depression among US adults.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2020 Jun 24;27(18):23048-23053. Epub 2020 Apr 24.

Independent University, Dhaka, 1219, Bangladesh.

Arsenic is a naturally occurring chemical in the environment. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) declared arsenic a class 1 human carcinogen. The inorganic form of arsenic is considered toxic to the human population; arsenic is a neurotoxin and can cause memory dysfunction. Very few studies have investigated the association between exposure to arsenic and depression in humans. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between urinary speciated arsenic and depression among adults in the USA using the 2015-2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III dataset. Depression was measured using the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). We computed a total depression score from the PHQ-9 and categorized individuals with a score ≥ 10 as depressed. The exposure included six different speciated arsenic concentrations dichotomized as at or above the limit of detection and below the limit of detection. We conducted a crude and multivariate logistic regression analysis using complex survey procedures to assess the association between speciated arsenic concentrations and depression. The sample included 1619 adults, of whom approximately half were females (51.69%) and married (53.29%). Seven percent of the sample had depression. Urinary arsenous acid was significantly associated with depression. In the adjusted model, arsenous acid was associated with depression with an odds ratio of 1.76 (95% CI 1.05-2.96, p = 0.035). No other forms of arsenic were significantly associated with depression. In this study, urinary arsenous acid was significantly associated with depression. Future research in humans is required to confirm or refute this finding.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-020-08858-2DOI Listing
June 2020
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