Publications by authors named "Hui-Peng Lee"

5 Publications

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Zanubrutinib for the treatment of MYD88 wild-type Waldenström macroglobulinemia: a substudy of the phase 3 ASPEN trial.

Blood Adv 2020 Dec;4(23):6009-6018

Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) lacking activating mutations in the MYD88 gene (MYD88WT) have demonstrated relatively poor outcomes to ibrutinib monotherapy, with no major responses reported in a phase 2 pivotal study. Zanubrutinib is a novel, selective Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor designed to maximize BTK occupancy and minimize off-target activity. The ASPEN study consisted of a randomized comparison of zanubrutinib and ibrutinib efficacy and safety in patients with WM who have the MYD88 mutation, as well as a separate cohort of patients without MYD88 mutation (MYD88WT) or with unknown mutational status who received zanubrutinib. Results from the latter single-arm cohort are reported herein. Efficacy endpoints included overall, major and complete (CR) or very good partial response (VGPR) rates, progression-free survival (PFS), duration of response (DOR), and overall survival (OS). Twenty-eight patients (23 relapsed/refractory; 5 treatment-naïve) were enrolled, including 26 with centrally confirmed MYD88WT disease and 2 with unknown MYD88 mutational status. At a median follow-up of 17.9 months, 7 of 26 MYD88WT patients (27%) had achieved a VGPR and 50% a major response (partial response or better); there were no CRs. At 18 months, the estimated PFS and OS rates were 68% and 88%, respectively, while the median DOR had not been reached. Two patients discontinued zanubrutinib due to adverse events. Treatment-emergent hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and major hemorrhages were reported in 3, 1 and 2 patients (including 1 concurrent with enoxaparin therapy), respectively. Results of this substudy demonstrate that zanubrutinib monotherapy can induce high quality responses in patients with MYD88WT WM. This trial is registered on www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT #03053440.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2020003010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7724905PMC
December 2020

Phase 2 study of parsaclisib (INCB050465), a highly selective, next-generation PI3Kδ inhibitor, in relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (CITADEL-202).

Leuk Lymphoma 2021 Feb 3;62(2):368-376. Epub 2020 Nov 3.

Department of Haematology, St Vincent's Hospital, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia.

Parsaclisib, a potent, highly selective, next-generation PI3Kδ inhibitor, was evaluated as monotherapy in CITADEL-202 (NCT02998476), an open-label, multicenter, phase 2 study in patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Patients enrolled into 2 groups (A, Bruton tyrosine kinase [BTK] inhibitor naïve,  = 55; B, BTK inhibitor experienced,  = 5) received oral parsaclisib 20 mg once daily for 8 weeks, then 20 mg once weekly while deriving benefit. The futility boundary was crossed at the interim analysis of Group A, resulting in a negative study. Parsaclisib monotherapy demonstrated an objective response rate (ORR) of 25.5% (8 complete metabolic responses/6 partial metabolic responses) and a median duration of response of 6.2 months. ORR in Group B was 20.0% (1 complete metabolic response). Parsaclisib monotherapy demonstrated manageable toxicities with no new safety signals reported. Further evaluation of parsaclisib in combination with standard therapies and active investigational agents is underway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10428194.2020.1832660DOI Listing
February 2021

A randomized phase 3 trial of zanubrutinib vs ibrutinib in symptomatic Waldenström macroglobulinemia: the ASPEN study.

Blood 2020 Oct;136(18):2038-2050

Department of Clinical Therapeutics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.

Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibition is an effective treatment approach for patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM). The phase 3 ASPEN study compared the efficacy and safety of ibrutinib, a first-generation BTK inhibitor, with zanubrutinib, a novel highly selective BTK inhibitor, in patients with WM. Patients with MYD88L265P disease were randomly assigned 1:1 to treatment with ibrutinib or zanubrutinib. The primary end point was the proportion of patients achieving a complete response (CR) or a very good partial response (VGPR) by independent review. Key secondary end points included major response rate (MRR), progression-free survival (PFS), duration of response (DOR), disease burden, and safety. A total of 201 patients were randomized, and 199 received ≥1 dose of study treatment. No patient achieved a CR. Twenty-nine (28%) zanubrutinib patients and 19 (19%) ibrutinib patients achieved a VGPR, a nonstatistically significant difference (P = .09). MRRs were 77% and 78%, respectively. Median DOR and PFS were not reached; 84% and 85% of ibrutinib and zanubrutinib patients were progression free at 18 months. Atrial fibrillation, contusion, diarrhea, peripheral edema, hemorrhage, muscle spasms, and pneumonia, as well as adverse events leading to treatment discontinuation, were less common among zanubrutinib recipients. Incidence of neutropenia was higher with zanubrutinib, although grade ≥3 infection rates were similar in both arms (1.2 and 1.1 events per 100 person-months). These results demonstrate that zanubrutinib and ibrutinib are highly effective in the treatment of WM, but zanubrutinib treatment was associated with a trend toward better response quality and less toxicity, particularly cardiovascular toxicity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood.2020006844DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7596850PMC
October 2020

Australian and New Zealand consensus statement on the management of lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and myeloma during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Intern Med J 2020 06 15;50(6):667-679. Epub 2020 May 15.

Department of Haematology, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

The COVID-19 pandemic poses a unique challenge to the care of patients with haematological malignancies. Viral pneumonia is known to cause disproportionately severe disease in patients with cancer, and patients with lymphoma, myeloma and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia are likely to be at particular risk of severe disease related to COVID-19. This statement has been developed by consensus among authors from Australia and New Zealand. We aim to provide supportive guidance to clinicians making individual patient decisions during the COVID-19 pandemic, in particular during periods that access to healthcare resources may be limited. General recommendations include those to minimise patient exposure to COVID-19, including the use of telehealth, avoidance of non-essential visits and minimisation of time spent by patients in infusion suites and other clinical areas. This statement also provides recommendations where appropriate in assessing indications for therapy, reducing therapy-associated immunosuppression and reducing healthcare utilisation in patients with specific haematological malignancies during the COVID-19 pandemic. Specific decisions regarding therapy of haematological malignancies will need to be individualised, based on disease risk, risks of immunosuppression, rates of community transmission of COVID-19 and available local healthcare resources.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14859DOI Listing
June 2020

A multicenter retrospective comparison of induction chemoimmunotherapy regimens on outcomes in transplant-eligible patients with previously untreated mantle cell lymphoma.

Hematol Oncol 2019 Aug 24;37(3):253-260. Epub 2019 May 24.

Department of Haematology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.

Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an uncommon and typically aggressive form of lymphoma. Although often initially chemosensitive, relapse is common. Several induction and conditioning regimens are used in transplant-eligible patients, and the optimal approach remains unknown. We performed an international, retrospective study of transplant-eligible patients to assess impact of induction chemoimmunotherapy and conditioning regimens on clinical outcomes. We identified 228 patients meeting inclusion criteria. Baseline characteristics were similar among the induction groups except for some variation in age. The type of induction chemoimmunotherapy received did not influence overall response rates (ORRs) (0.43), progression-free survival (PFS) (P > .67), or overall survival (OS) (P > .35) on multivariate analysis (PFS and OS). Delivery of autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) was associated with favorable PFS and OS (0.01) on univariate analysis only; this benefit was not seen on multivariate analysis-PFS (0.36) and OS (0.21). Compared with busulfan and melphalan (BuMel), the use of the carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan (BEAM)-conditioning regimen was associated with inferior PFS (HR = 2.0 [95% CI 1.1-3.6], 0.02) but not OS (HR = 1.1 [95% CI 0.5-2.3], 0.81) on univariate analysis only. Within the limits of a retrospective study and modest power for some comparisons, type of induction therapy did not influence ORR, PFS, or OS for transplant-eligible patients with MCL. International efforts are required to perform randomized clinical trials evaluating chemoimmunotherapy induction regimens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hon.2618DOI Listing
August 2019