Publications by authors named "Hugo Luca Corrêa"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Age-related Decline in Renal Function is Attenuated in Master Athletes.

Int J Sports Med 2021 Mar 8. Epub 2021 Mar 8.

Graduate Program on Physical Education and Health, Catholic University of Brasilia, Taguatinga, Brazil.

This study analyzed the kidney function and biomarkers of health in lifelong-trained sprinters and endurance runners, and compared them to untrained aged-matched and young controls. Sixty-two men (21-66 yr.) were recruited and allocated as master athletes from sprints (n=25), master athletes from endurance events (n=8), untrained middle-aged (n=14) and young controls (n=15). Participants underwent anamnesis, anthropometric measures and blood sampling for biochemical analyses of klotho, FGF23 and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Master sprinters presented better kidney function in relation to endurance athletes and their untrained peers (<0.0001). A number of biochemical variables were observed that negatively (i. e., GDF-15, TGF-Beta, IL-18) or positively (i. e., klotho/FGF23 ratio and sestrin-2) correlated with eGFR. Sestrin-2 presented the strongest association with eGFR (r=0.5, =0.03). Results also revealed that lifelong-trained individuals presented the highest probability of having better values for cystatin C and thus an estimated glomerular filtration rate that was 37-49% higher than untrained peers. Master sprinters presented better kidney function in relation to endurance athletes and middle-aged untrained peers. Sestrin-2 may play a role in exercise-induced kidney function protection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-1332-1594DOI Listing
March 2021

Effects of dynamic and isometric resistance training protocols on metabolic profile in hemodialysis patients: a randomized controlled trial.

Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 2021 Mar 2. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Universidade Catolica de Brasilia, 28106, Physical Education, Taguatinga, DF, Brazil.

To compare the effect of dynamic (DRT) and isometric (IRT) resistance training on glycemic homeostasis, lipid profile, and nitric oxide (NO) in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Patients were randomly distributed into three groups: control (CTL; n=65), DRT (n=65), and IRT (n=67). Patients were tested for fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin, oral glucose tolerance test, insulin resistance, lipid profile, leptin, insulin, adiponectin, C-reactive protein, and NO were assessed pre- and post-intervention period. Patients underwent to strength and body composition assessments. Subjects allocated in both DRT and IRT groups took part in a 24-week resistance training program, three times per week. Each training session was approximately one hour before dialysis and consisted of 3 sets of 8-12 repetitions at low intensity. Total workload was higher in the DRT as compared with the IRT. This heightened workload related to better glycemic homeostasis in HD patients as measured by regulation of insulin, adiponectin, and leptin, while improvement of triglycerides, free-fat mass, and muscle strength. Additionally, NO levels were increased on DRT group. NO was significantly correlated with glucose intolerance (r=-0.42, p=0.0155) and workload (r=0.46, p=0.0022). The IRT group only improved strength (p<0.05). 24-week of DRT improved glycemic homeostasis, lipid profile, and NO in HD patients. Although IRT seems to play an important role in increasing strength, DRT might be a better choice to promote metabolic adjustments in HD patients. Clinical Trial http://www.ensaiosclinicos.gov.br/rg/RBR-3gpg5w/; nº RBR-3gpg5w Novelty Bullets: -DRT might be a better choice for metabolic improvements in CKD patients. -Exercise-training might treat metabolic imbalance in CKD patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/apnm-2020-0900DOI Listing
March 2021

Effects of pre-dialysis resistance training on sarcopenia, inflammatory profile, and anemia biomarkers in older community-dwelling patients with chronic kidney disease: a randomized controlled trial.

Int Urol Nephrol 2021 Feb 20. Epub 2021 Feb 20.

Programa de Pós-Graduação em Educação Física, Universidade Católica de Brasília, Brasília, DF, Brazil.

Background: Sarcopenia and chronic kidney disease (CKD) have been associated with negative outcomes in older people, including inflammatory profile and anemia biomarkers.

Aims: To investigate the effects of pre-dialysis resistance training (RT) on sarcopenia, inflammatory profile, and anemia biomarkers in older patients with CKD.

Methods: A total of 107 patients with CKD (65.4 ± 3.7 years) were randomly allocated into four groups: sarcopenic RT (n = 37), non-sarcopenic RT (n = 20), sarcopenic control (n = 28), and non-sarcopenic control (n = 22). DXA and handgrip strength were used to classify sarcopenia according to EWGSOP-2. Treatment groups underwent a 24-week intervention with RT before each dialysis session, three times per week. Blood sample analysis for ferritin, hepcidin, iron availability, and inflammatory profile (TNFα, IL-6, and IL-10) was conducted. All-cause mortality was recorded over 5 years.

Results: Sarcopenic RT group increased iron availability after the intervention, while their counterparts decreased. Ferritin and hepcidin significantly decreased in sarcopenic RT group. RT elicited a reduction in both TNFα and IL-6, while increasing IL-10 in both intervention groups. The rate of sarcopenic subjects substantially decreased after the intervention period (from 37 to 17 in the RT group; p = 0.01). The proportion of deaths was higher (P = 0.033) for sarcopenic subjects (Controls 35.7% vs RT 29.7%) when compared to non-sarcopenic subjects (Controls 18% vs RT 10%). The proportion of deaths decreased according to the randomization group (X2 = 8.704; P < 0.1).

Conclusions: The 24-week RT intervention elicited a better sarcopenia status, better inflammatory profile, and improved anemia biomarkers. Sarcopenia was associated with higher mortality rate in older patients with CKD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11255-021-02799-6DOI Listing
February 2021

Low-load resistance training with blood flow restriction prevent renal function decline: The role of the redox balance, angiotensin 1-7 and vasopressin.

Physiol Behav 2021 Mar 16;230:113295. Epub 2020 Dec 16.

Post-Graduate Program of Physical Education of Catholic University of Brasilia, Federal District, Brazil-71966-700. Electronic address:

Aims: We sought to investigate the effect of resistance training (RT) and low-load RT with moderate blood flow restriction (RT+BFR) on blood pressure, exercise pressor response, redox balance and vasoactive peptides, body composition and muscle strength in patients with stage two of chronic kidney disease (CKD).

Methods: We conducted a 6-month randomized controlled exercise intervention in 90 male and female hypertensive CKD patients (58±9 years with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR; of 66.1 ± 1.2 mL/kg/1.73m). Participants were randomized to one of three groups (n = 30/group); control group (CTL), RT, and RT+BFR. RT and RT+BFR performed three weekly training sessions using similar periodization for six months (two-month mesocycles), but of different intensities.

Results: There was similarly effects between RT and RT+BFR in reducing systolic and diastolic blood pressure during daytime and 24hour period (RT: 10.4%; RT+BFR: 10.3% of decrease), fat mass, F-isoprostanes, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and vasopressin (p<0.05 pre-vs post). Also promoted the increase of angiotensin 1-7, nitric oxide (NO), catalase, Trolox equivalent and muscle strength (p<0.05). Both training models attenuated the decline of estimated glomerular filtration rate (p<0.0001 vs CTL). However, only RT+BFR was associated with lower discomfort during exercise (p<0.0001 pre-vs post). Statistical significance was considered with p < 0.05.

Conclusion: These findings suggest low-load RT+BFR as a promising non-pharmacological strategy to control blood pressure, oxidative stress, vasoactive peptides, and consequently, attenuate the decrease of the eGFR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2020.113295DOI Listing
March 2021

Biomarkers and Redox Balance in Aging Rats after Dynamic and Isometric Resistance Training.

Int J Sports Med 2021 Mar 18;42(3):283-290. Epub 2020 Sep 18.

Graduate Program in Physical Education, Catholic University of Brasília, Brasília, Brazil.

Aging muscle is prone to sarcopenia and its associated telomere shortening and increased oxidative stress. Telomeres are protected by a shelterin protein complex, proteins expressed in response to DNA damage. Aerobic exercise training has shown to positively modulate these proteins while aging, but the effects of resistance training are less clear. This investigation was to examine the role of dynamic and isometric RT on markers of senescence and muscle apoptosis: checkpoint kinase 2, 53 kDa protein, shelterin telomere repeat binding 1 and 2, DNA repair, telomere length and redox state in the quadriceps muscle. Fifteen 49-week-old male rats were divided into three groups: control, dynamic resistance training, and isometric resistance training. Dynamic and isometric groups completed five sessions per week during 16 weeks at low to moderate intensity (20-70% maximal load). Only dynamic group decreased expression of 53 kDa protein, proteins from shelterin complex, oxidative stress, and improved antioxidant defense. There was no difference among groups regarding telomere length. In conclusion, dynamic resistance training was more effective than isometric in reducing markers of aging and muscle apoptosis in elderly rats. This modality should be considered as valuable tool do counteract the deleterious effects of aging.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-1231-5410DOI Listing
March 2021

Blood Flow Restriction Training Blunts Chronic Kidney Disease Progression in Humans.

Med Sci Sports Exerc 2021 02;53(2):249-257

Graduate Program in Physical Education, Catholic University of Brasilia, Brasilia, BRAZIL.

Purpose: This study aimed to verify the effect of 6 months of periodized resistance training (RT) with and without blood flow restriction (BFR) in patients with stage 2 chronic kidney disease (CKD) on glomerular filtration rate (GFR), uremic parameters, cytokines, and klotho-fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) axis.

Methods: A total of 105 subjects were randomized in three groups of 35 each: control (CTL), RT, and RT + BFR. A first visit was required for an anamnesis to evaluate the number of medications and anthropometric measurements (body weight, height, and body mass index). Muscle strength (one-repetition maximum) was assessed. Venous blood samples were collected at baseline and after 6 months of training in all patients for the analysis of markers of renal function and integrity, as well as for the determination of the inflammatory profile. Statistical significances were adopted with P < 0.05.

Results: Both training therapies attenuated the decline of GFR (P < 0.05). The majority of CTL patients declined to stage 3 CKD (88.5%), whereas fewer incidents were noted with RT (25.7%) and RT + BFR (17.1%). Improved uremic parameters as well as inflammation (IL-6, IL-10, IL-15, IL-17a, IL-18, and TNF-α) and klotho-FGF23 axis in RT and RT + BFR (P < 0.05) were observed. Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 was not changed (P > 0.05) but presented a large effect size (Cohen's d), demonstrating a propensity for improvement.

Conclusion: Six months of periodized RT with and without BFR in patients with stage 2 CKD attenuated the progression of the disease by maintaining GFR, improving uremic parameters, cytokine profile regulation, and klotho-FGF23 axis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0000000000002465DOI Listing
February 2021

Resistance training improves sleep quality, redox balance and inflammatory profile in maintenance hemodialysis patients: a randomized controlled trial.

Sci Rep 2020 07 16;10(1):11708. Epub 2020 Jul 16.

Graduate Program of Physical Education, Catholic University of Brasilia (USB), EPTC, QS07, LT1 s/n. Bloco G Sala 117, Águas Claras, Taguatinga, Brasília, DF, 71966-700, Brazil.

Patients in maintenance hemodialisys (HD) present sleep disorders, increased inflammation, unbalanced redox profiles, and elevated biomarkers representing endothelial dysfunction. Resistance training (RT) has shown to mitigate the loss of muscle mass, strength, improve inflammatory profiles, and endothelial function while decreasing oxidative stress for those in HD. However, the relation between those factors and sleep quality are inadequately described. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of 3 months of RT on sleep quality, redox balance, nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, inflammation profile, and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) in patients undergoing HD. Our primary goal was to describe the role of RT on sleep quality. Our secondary goal was to evaluate the effect of RT on NO, metabolism markers, and inflammatory and redox profiles as potential mechanisms to explain RT-induced sleep quality changes. Fifty-five men undergoing maintenance hemodialysis were randomized into either a control (CTL, n = 25) and RT group (RTG; n = 30). Participants in the RT group demonstrated an improvement in sleep pattern, redox, inflammatory profiles, and biomarkers of endothelial function (NO and ADMA). This group also increased muscle strength (total workload in RT exercises of upper and lower limbs). These findings support that RT may improve the clinical status of HD patients by improving their sleep quality, oxidative and inflammatory parameters.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-68602-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7367305PMC
July 2020

Effects of resistance training on hepcidin levels and iron bioavailability in older individuals with end-stage renal disease: A randomized controlled trial.

Exp Gerontol 2020 10 4;139:111017. Epub 2020 Jul 4.

Catholic University of Brasilia, Federal District, Brazil.

Anemia is an inherent complication of older individuals with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) that is associated with inflammation which in turn is an important factor in the activation of hepcidin that contributes to the decrease in serum iron. Athough resistance training (RT) seems to reduce inflammation in ESRD, its influence on hepcidin and iron availability in hemodialysis patients is unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to exemine the effects of RT in on inflammatory profile, hepcidin, and iron status in older individuals with ESRD. End-stage renal disease patients (N: 157, age: 66.8 ± 3.6; body mass: 73 ± 15 body mass index:27 ± 3), were assigned to control (CTL n: 76) and exercise groups (RT n: 81). RT consisted of 24 weeks/3 days per week of a moderate intensity. There was an increase in the bioavailability of iron (ΔRT: 22.2; ΔCTL: -1 μg/dL, p < 0.0001), a decrease in hepcidin levels (ΔRT: -7.9; ΔCTL: 0.2 ng/mL, p < 0.0001),and an improvement of the inflammatory profile. These novel findings show that RT is a potential coadjuvant to reduce iron deficiency by decreasing the levels of hepcidin and pro-inflammatory markers in older patients undergoing hemodialysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.exger.2020.111017DOI Listing
October 2020