Publications by authors named "Hubert Zipper"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Identification of novel enzymes with different hydrolytic activities by metagenome expression cloning.

J Biotechnol 2007 Jan 12;127(4):575-92. Epub 2006 Aug 12.

Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology, Institute for Interfacial Engineering, University of Stuttgart, Nobelstrasse 12, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany.

Metagenome cloning has become a powerful tool to exploit the biocatalytic potential of microbial communities for the discovery of novel biocatalysts. In a novel variant of direct expression cloning, metagenomic DNA was isolated from compost by a modified direct lysis method, purified by size exclusion chromatography and cloned into an expression vector allowing bidirectional transcription. Transformation of Escherichia coli DH5alpha resulted in a metagenomic expression library with an average insert size of 3.2 kb. To estimate the functional diversity of the constructed library, it was screened by different approaches based on functional heterologous expression. A large number of active clones were identified, including lipolytic enzymes, amylases, phosphatases and dioxygenases. Molecular analysis of one important class of industrial biocatalysts, the lipolytic enzymes, confirmed the novelty and dissimilarity of all recovered genes, which exhibited only limited similarity to known enzymes. Equally, the novelty of another three genes encoding phosphatase or dioxygenase activity, respectively, was shown. These results demonstrate the suitability of this direct cloning approach, which comprised a dual-orientation expression vector and a simple one-step DNA purification method, for the efficient discovery of numerous active novel clones. By this means it provides an efficient way for the rapid generation of large libraries of hitherto unknown enzyme candidates which could be screened for different specific target reactions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiotec.2006.07.036DOI Listing
January 2007

Investigations on DNA intercalation and surface binding by SYBR Green I, its structure determination and methodological implications.

Nucleic Acids Res 2004 Jul 12;32(12):e103. Epub 2004 Jul 12.

Laboratory of Biochemistry, Institute for Interfacial Engineering, University of Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany.

The detection of double-stranded (ds) DNA by SYBR Green I (SG) is important in many molecular biology methods including gel electrophoresis, dsDNA quantification in solution and real-time PCR. Biophysical studies at defined dye/base pair ratios (dbprs) were used to determine the structure-property relationships that affect methods applying SG. These studies revealed the occurrence of intercalation, followed by surface binding at dbprs above approximately 0.15. Only the latter led to a significant increase in fluorescence. Studies with poly(dA)* poly(dT) and poly(dG)* poly(dC) homopolymers showed sequence-specific binding of SG. Also, salts had a marked impact on SG fluorescence. We also noted binding of SG to single-stranded (ss) DNA, although SG/ssDNA fluorescence was at least approximately 11-fold lower than with dsDNA. To perform these studies, we determined the structure of SG by mass spectrometry and NMR analysis to be [2-[N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N-propylamino]-4-[2,3-dihydro-3-methyl-(benzo-1,3-thiazol-2-yl)-methylidene]-1-phenyl-quinolinium]. For comparison, the structure of PicoGreen (PG) was also determined and is [2-[N-bis-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-amino]-4-[2,3-dihydro-3-methyl-(benzo-1,3-thiazol-2-yl)-methylidene]-1-phenyl-quinolinium]+. These structure-property relationships help in the design of methods that use SG, in particular dsDNA quantification in solution and real-time PCR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gnh101DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC484200PMC
July 2004

Mechanisms underlying the impact of humic acids on DNA quantification by SYBR Green I and consequences for the analysis of soils and aquatic sediments.

Nucleic Acids Res 2003 Apr;31(7):e39

Laboratory of Biochemistry, Chair for Interfacial Engineering, University of Stuttgart and Fraunhofer IGB, Nobelstrasse 12, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany.

DNA quantification of soils and sediments is useful for the investigation of microbial communities and for the acquisition of their genomes that are exploited for the production of natural products. However, in such samples DNA quantification is impaired by humic acids (HA). Due to its lack of specificity and sensitivity, UV spectrophotometry cannot be applied. Consequently, fluorimetric assays applying Hoechst (H) 33258 or PicoGreen (PG) are used. Here, we investigated the SYBR Green I (SG) assay, which was also affected by HA, but was found to be 25- and 1.7-fold more sensitive compared to the H 33258 and PG assays, respectively. Spectrophotometric, fluorimetric and quenching studies as well as gel mobility shift assays suggested that the effect of HA on the SG assay was based on an inner filter effect, collisional quenching and binding of SG to HA. As to the latter finding, the standard 6250-fold dilution of the SG reagent was optimised to a 2000-fold dilution. Although the sensitivity of the optimised SG assay was reduced by a factor of 1.3, the interfering effect of HA could be reduced up to 22-fold. A significant reduction of HA interferences by lowering the pH of the assay was not observed. Finally, the performance of the modified SG assay and the corresponding evaluation methods were verified by the determination of DNA recoveries and concentrations of standards and environmental samples in comparison to the PG assay.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC152824PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gng039DOI Listing
April 2003