Publications by authors named "Hsiu-Hui Chang"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Tiotropium/Olodaterol treatment reduces cigarette smoke extract-induced cell death in BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells.

BMC Pharmacol Toxicol 2020 10 31;21(1):74. Epub 2020 Oct 31.

Division of Chest Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Changhua Christian Hospital, 135 Nanhsiao Street, Changhua, 50006, Taiwan, Republic of China.

Background: Cigarette smoking is a critical risk factor for the destruction of lung parenchyma or the development of emphysema, which is characteristic of COPD. Disruption of epithelial layer integrity may contribute to lung injury following cigarette smoke extract (CSE) exposure. Tiotropium/olodaterol acts as a bronchodilator for COPD treatment; however, the effect of dual bronchodilators on epithelial cell injury and its underlying mechanism remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated the effect of tiotropium/olodaterol on CSE-mediated cell death and the underlying mechanisms.

Methods: Cell viability was determined using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy were evaluated using flow cytometry. Autophagy-related protein, phosphorylated ERK, expression was determined using Western blotting.

Results: Tiotropium/olodaterol significantly inhibited CSE-induced cell death, mitochondria dysfunction, and autophagy, which had no significant effect on apoptosis or necrosis in BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells. Moreover, tiotropium/olodaterol attenuated CSE-induced upregulation of JNK.

Conclusions: CSE induced cell death and caused consistent patterns of autophagy and JNK activation in BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells. Tiotropium/olodaterol treatment protected bronchial epithelial cells from CSE-induced injury and inhibited activation of autophagy and upregulation of JNK phosphorylation. These results indicate that tiotropium/olodaterol may protect epithelial cells from the deleterious effects of CSE exposure, which is associated with the regulation of autophagy and JNK activation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40360-020-00451-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7603690PMC
October 2020

Prioritization of pesticides in crops with a semi-quantitative risk ranking method for Taiwan postmarket monitoring program.

J Food Drug Anal 2019 01 3;27(1):347-354. Epub 2018 Jul 3.

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Health Research Institutes, Taiwan. Electronic address:

A risk-based prioritization of chemical hazards in monitoring programs allows regulatory agencies to focus on the most potentially concerned items involving human health risk. In this study, a risk-based matrix, with a scoring method using multiple factors for severity and probability of exposure, was employed to identify the pesticides presented in crops that may pose the greatest risk to human health. Both the probability of exposure and the severity were assessed for 91 pesticides detected in a Taiwanese postmarketing monitoring program. Probability of exposure was evaluated based on the probability of consumption and evidence of pesticide residues in crops. Severity was assessed based on the nature of the hazard (i.e., the description of toxic effects), and the acceptable daily intake (ADI) reported by available toxicological reports. This study showed that the nature of the hazard and probability of consumption had the strongest contribution to risk score. Dithiocarbamates, endosulfan, and carbofuran were identified as the pesticides with the highest concern for human health risks in Taiwan. These pesticides should be monitored more frequently than others in crops during the postmarketing monitoring program. However, some uncertainties shall be noted or improved when this methodology is applied for risk prioritization in the future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfda.2018.06.009DOI Listing
January 2019

Effectiveness of Essence of Chicken in Improving Cognitive Function in Young People Under Work-Related Stress: A Randomized Double-Blind Trial.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2016 May;95(19):e3640

From the Department of Neurology (LC, K-YC, P-JW, C-JH), Shuang-Ho Hospital, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City; Department of Psychiatry (H-MW), Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi; Department of Family Medicine (Y-CL, Y-RC, C-PL), Shuang-Ho Hospital, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University; Department of Psychiatry (W-LH); Sleep Center (H-YT); Health Management Center (Y-RC), Shuang-Ho Hospital, School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City; Department of International Trade (H-HC), Chungyu Institute of Technology, Keelung; Graduate Institute for Neural Regenerative Medicine (Y-CH), College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Work-related stress (WS) can result in considerable and extensive changes in physiological and psychological performance. WS beyond the optimal levels induces anxiety, confusion, exhaustion, and burnout. Chronic WS affects neurocognitive performance, particularly attention and visuospatial memory. Essence of chicken (EC) has been reported to improve neurocognitive function after mental stress.To investigate the beneficial effects of EC in improving neurocognitive performance under WS, we conducted a randomized, double blind trial. Total 102 young workers in New Taipei City with high WS, evaluated using the Individual Subjective Perception Job Stress Scale scores (>36 for job leaders and 33 for nonleaders) were recruited. Fifty-one participants received 70 mL of EC and 51 received a placebo daily for 2 weeks. Blood tests and neurocognitive assessment were performed before treatment, at the end of treatment, and 2 weeks after treatment.EC improved the performance of participants with high depression scores in the form-color associative memory test, used for assessing short-term memory. Although creatinine and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) levels increased in week 2, but the levels returned to the baseline in week 4. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels decreased in week 4.EC significantly improved short-term memory in participants with high WS and concomitant depressive mood, although it slightly increased GPT and creatinine levels and reduced BUN levels. The long-term treatment effects of EC warrant further investigation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000003640DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4902523PMC
May 2016

Rapid and sensitive detection of Feline immunodeficiency virus using an insulated isothermal PCR-based assay with a point-of-need PCR detection platform.

J Vet Diagn Invest 2015 Jul 16;27(4):510-5. Epub 2015 Jul 16.

Department of Biomedical and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (Wilkes, Kania)GeneReach USA, Lexington, MA (Tsai, Lee, Chang, Ma, Chang, Wang).

Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is an important infectious agent of cats. Clinical syndromes resulting from FIV infection include immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections, and neoplasia. In our study, a 5' long terminal repeat/gag region-based reverse transcription insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (RT-iiPCR) was developed to amplify all known FIV strains to facilitate point-of-need FIV diagnosis. The RT-iiPCR method was applied in a point-of-need PCR detection platform--a field-deployable device capable of generating automatically interpreted RT-iiPCR results from nucleic acids within 1 hr. Limit of detection 95% of FIV RT-iiPCR was calculated to be 95 copies standard in vitro transcription RNA per reaction. Endpoint dilution studies with serial dilutions of an ATCC FIV type strain showed that the sensitivity of lyophilized FIV RT-iiPCR reagent was comparable to that of a reference nested PCR. The established reaction did not amplify any nontargeted feline pathogens, including Felid herpesvirus 1, feline coronavirus, Feline calicivirus, Feline leukemia virus, Mycoplasma haemofelis, and Chlamydophila felis. Based on analysis of 76 clinical samples (including blood and bone marrow) with the FIV RT-iiPCR, test sensitivity was 97.78% (44/45), specificity was 100.00% (31/31), and agreement was 98.65% (75/76), determined against a reference nested-PCR assay. A kappa value of 0.97 indicated excellent correlation between these 2 methods. The lyophilized FIV RT-iiPCR reagent, deployed on a user-friendly portable device, has potential utility for rapid and easy point-of-need detection of FIV in cats.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1040638715593597DOI Listing
July 2015

Digoxin Suppresses Tumor Malignancy through Inhibiting Multiple Src-Related Signaling Pathways in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

PLoS One 2015 8;10(5):e0123305. Epub 2015 May 8.

Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan; Agricultural Biotechnology Center, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan.

Non-small cell lung cancer is the predominant type of lung cancer, resulting in high mortality worldwide. Digoxin, a cardiac glycoside, has recently been suggested to be a novel chemotherapeutic agent. Src is an oncogene that plays an important role in cancer progression and is therefore a potential target for cancer therapy. Here, we investigated whether digoxin could suppress lung cancer progression through the inhibition of Src activity. The effects of digoxin on lung cancer cell functions were investigated using colony formation, migration and invasion assays. Western blotting and qPCR assays were used to analyze the mRNA and protein expression levels of Src and its downstream proteins, and a cell viability assay was used to measure cellular cytotoxicity effects. The results of the cell function assays revealed that digoxin inhibited the proliferation, invasion, migration, and colony formation of A549 lung cancer cells. Similar effects of digoxin were also observed in other lung cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we found that digoxin significantly suppressed Src activity and its protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner as well as reduced EGFR and STAT3 activity. Our data suggest that digoxin is a potential anticancer agent that may suppress lung cancer progression through inhibiting Src and the activity of related proteins.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0123305PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4425490PMC
February 2016

An insulated isothermal PCR method on a field-deployable device for rapid and sensitive detection of canine parvovirus type 2 at points of need.

J Virol Methods 2015 Aug 15;220:35-8. Epub 2015 Apr 15.

GeneReach USA, Lexington, MA, United States.

Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), including subtypes 2a, 2b and 2c, causes an acute enteric disease in both domestic and wild animals. Rapid and sensitive diagnosis aids effective disease management at points of need (PON). A commercially available, field-deployable and user-friendly system, designed with insulated isothermal PCR (iiPCR) technology, displays excellent sensitivity and specificity for nucleic acid detection. An iiPCR method was developed for on-site detection of all circulating CPV-2 strains. Limit of detection was determined using plasmid DNA. CPV-2a, 2b and 2c strains, a feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) strain, and nine canine pathogens were tested to evaluate assay specificity. Reaction sensitivity and performance were compared with an in-house real-time PCR using serial dilutions of a CPV-2b strain and 100 canine fecal clinical samples collected from 2010 to 2014, respectively. The 95% limit of detection of the iiPCR method was 13 copies of standard DNA and detection limits for CPV-2b DNA were equivalent for iiPCR and real-time PCR. The iiPCR reaction detected CPV-2a, 2b and 2c and FPV. Non-targeted pathogens were not detected. Test results of real-time PCR and iiPCR from 99 fecal samples agreed with each other, while one real-time PCR-positive sample tested negative by iiPCR. Therefore, excellent agreement (k = 0.98) with sensitivity of 98.41% and specificity of 100% in detecting CPV-2 in feces was found between the two methods. In conclusion, the iiPCR system has potential to serve as a useful tool for rapid and accurate PON, molecular detection of CPV-2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jviromet.2015.04.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7119629PMC
August 2015

In silico prediction and in vitro characterization of multifunctional human RNase3.

Biomed Res Int 2013 17;2013:170398. Epub 2013 Jan 17.

Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan.

Human ribonucleases A (hRNaseA) superfamily consists of thirteen members with high-structure similarities but exhibits divergent physiological functions other than RNase activity. Evolution of hRNaseA superfamily has gained novel functions which may be preserved in a unique region or domain to account for additional molecular interactions. hRNase3 has multiple functions including ribonucleolytic, heparan sulfate (HS) binding, cellular binding, endocytic, lipid destabilization, cytotoxic, and antimicrobial activities. In this study, three putative multifunctional regions, (34)RWRCK(38) (HBR1), (75)RSRFR(79) (HBR2), and (101)RPGRR(105) (HBR3), of hRNase3 have been identified employing in silico sequence analysis and validated employing in vitro activity assays. A heparin binding peptide containing HBR1 is characterized to act as a key element associated with HS binding, cellular binding, and lipid binding activities. In this study, we provide novel insights to identify functional regions of hRNase3 that may have implications for all hRNaseA superfamily members.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/170398DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3581242PMC
September 2013

OnabotulinumtoxinA improves tactile and mechanical pain perception in painful diabetic polyneuropathy.

Clin J Pain 2013 Apr;29(4):305-10

The Neurologic Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan.

Objectives: Diabetic neuropathic pain may be relieved by onabotulinumtoxinA (BoNT/A). However, whether BoNT/A changes sensory perception in neuropathic patients remains unknown. This study used a double-blind crossover design to explore the possible effect of BoNT/A on sensory perception.

Methods: Eighteen patients with painful diabetic polyneuropathy underwent 2 consecutive 12-week periods of treatment either in the sequence of saline (control) and then BoNT/A (SB cohort, n=9) or BoNT/A followed by saline (BS cohort, n=9). Sensory perception was assessed according to the tactile threshold [TT, logarithmized force (g) of von Frey filaments] and mechanical pain threshold [PT, logarithmized weight (g) of weighted syringes], both being averages from 4 individual measurements of bilateral medial and lateral feet obtained at baseline (before injections) and at weeks 1, 4, 8, and 12 after treatment.

Results: In either the SB or the BS cohort, there was a decrease in the TT and the PT after treatment with BoNT/A but not with saline. In the analysis merging both cohorts (n=18), BoNT/A resulted in a significant decrease in TT and PT at weeks 1, 4, 8, and 12 (all Ps<0.05 vs. saline). The longitudinal effect of BoNT/A on TT and PT remained significant when baseline values, treatment sequences, and periods were controlled using generalized estimating equations.

Discussion: BoNT/A may improve tactile and mechanical pain perception in painful diabetic polyneuropathy. The beneficial effects of BoNT/A deserves further study to elucidate the exact mechanism and potential for preventing insensate injuries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/AJP.0b013e318255c132DOI Listing
April 2013