Publications by authors named "Hossam Tayeb"

10 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Preparation and optimization of aloe ferox gel loaded with Finasteride-Oregano oil nanocubosomes for treatment of alopecia.

Drug Deliv 2022 Dec;29(1):284-293

Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Alopecia areata is a skin disorder characterized by scarless, localized hair loss that is usually managed by topical treatments that might further worsen the condition. Therefore, the current study aimed to develop nano-cubosomes loaded with finasteride (FI) and oregano oil (Or) to improve drug solubility and permeation through skin and then incorporate it into an aloe ferox gel base. An l-optimal coordinate exchange design was adopted to optimize nano-cubosomes. Phytantriol and Alkyl Acrylate were employed as the lipid material, and surfactant respectively for cubosomes manufacture. The produced formulations were assessed for their particle size, entrapment efficiency (EE%), FI steady-state flux (Jss) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against Pro-pionibacterium acnes. Optimal FI-Or-NCu had a particle size of 135 nm, EE% equals 70%, Jss of 1.85 μg/cm2.h, and MIC of 0.44 μg/ml. The optimum formulation loaded gel gained the highest drug release percent and ex vivo skin permeation compared to FI aqueous suspension, and pure FI loaded gel. Aloe ferox and oregano oil in the optimized gel formulation had a synergistic activity on the FI permeation across the skin and against the growth of p. acne bacteria which could favor their use in treating alopecia. Thus, this investigation affirms the ability of FI-Or-NCu loaded aloe ferox gel could be an effective strategy that would enhance FI release and permeation through skin and maximize its favorable effects in treating alopecia.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10717544.2022.2026534DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8757594PMC
December 2022

Preparation and Optimization of Garlic Oil/Apple Cider Vinegar Nanoemulsion Loaded with Minoxidil to Treat Alopecia.

Pharmaceutics 2021 Dec 14;13(12). Epub 2021 Dec 14.

Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62511, Egypt.

Alopecia areata is a scarless, localized hair loss disorder that is typically treated with topical formulations that ultimately only further irritate the condition. Hence, the goal of this study was to develop a nanoemulsion with a base of garlic oil (GO) and apple cider vinegar (APCV) and loaded with minoxidil (MX) in order to enhance drug solubilization and permeation through skin. A distance coordinate exchange quadratic mixture design was used to optimize the proposed nanoemulsion. Span 20 and Tween 20 mixtures were used as the surfactant, and Transcutol was used as the co-surfactant. The developed formulations were characterized for their droplet size, minoxidil steady-state flux (MX Jss) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against . The optimized MX-GO-APCV nanoemulsion had a droplet size of 110 nm, MX Jss of 3 μg/cm h, and MIC of 0.275 μg/mL. The optimized formulation acquired the highest ex vivo skin permeation parameters compared to MX aqueous dispersion, and varying formulations lacked one or more components of the proposed nanoemulsion. GO and APCV in the optimized formulation had a synergistic, enhancing activity on the MX permeation across the skin membrane, and the percent permeated increased from 12.7% to 41.6%. Finally, the MX-GO-APCV nanoemulsion followed the Korsmeyer-Peppas model of diffusion, and the value of the release exponent (n) obtained for the formulations was found to be 1.0124, implying that the MX permeation followed Super case II transport. These results demonstrate that the MX-GO-APCV nanoemulsion formulation could be useful in promoting MX activity in treating alopecia areata.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics13122150DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8706394PMC
December 2021

Investigation of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 and 2 Mutations in Acute Leukemia Patients in Saudi Arabia.

Genes (Basel) 2021 12 9;12(12). Epub 2021 Dec 9.

Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 80200, Saudi Arabia.

Different forms of human cancer show mutations for isocitrate dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (IDH1/2). Mutation of these genes can cause aberrant methylation of the genome CpG islands (CGIs), which leads to an increase of suppressed oncogenes transcription or repression of active tumor suppressor gene transcription. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of IDH1/2 mutations in acute leukemia patients. The study cohort included 43 AML patients and 30 childhood ALL patients, from whom DNA bone marrow samples were taken. The alteration hotspots in codons IDH1 (R132) and IDH2 (R172 and R140) were examined via direct sequencing. Mutations in IDH1 were detected in 7 out of 43 (16.2%) AML patients; 5 of them occurred at codon R132. The other two mutations included a single-nucleotide polymorphism, which affected codon G105 in one patient. However, no mutation was detected in the IDH2 in any of the patients. Moreover, no mutations were detected in either IDH1 or IDH2 in ALL patients. The dominance of IDH1 mutations in AML, which was 16%, emphasizes the existence of the mutation in our population. On the other hand, IDH2 mutation was observed to be less frequent in both illnesses. Due to the limitation of using a small sample size, larger cohort screening is recommended to determine their usefulness as prognostic indicators.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/genes12121963DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8701864PMC
December 2021

Nanoemulsions: Formulation, characterization, biological fate, and potential role against COVID-19 and other viral outbreaks.

Colloid Interface Sci Commun 2021 Nov 20;45:100533. Epub 2021 Oct 20.

Nanomedicine Unit, Center of Innovations in Personalized Medicine (CIPM), King Abdulaziz University, 21589 Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Viral diseases are emerging as global threats. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), that causes coronavirus disease (COVID-19), has severe global impacts. Safety, dosage, and potency of vaccines recently approved for emergency use against SARS-CoV-2 need further evaluation. There is still no effective treatment against COVID-19; therefore, safe, and effective vaccines or therapeutics against SARS-CoV-2 are urgently needed. Oil-in-water nanoemulsions (O/W NEs) are emerging as sophisticated, protective, and therapeutic platforms. Encapsulation capacity, which offers better drug pharmacokinetics, coupled with the tunable surfaces present NEs as promising tools for pharmaceutical applications. The challenges facing drug discovery, and the advancements of NEs in drug delivery demonstrate the potential of NEs against evolving diseases, like COVID-19. Here we summarize current COVID-19 knowledge and discuss the composition, stability, preparation, characterization, and biological fate of O/W NEs. We also provide insights into NE structural-functional properties that may contribute to therapeutic or preventative solutions against COVID-19.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.colcom.2021.100533DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8526445PMC
November 2021

Development of Multi-Compartment 3D-Printed Tablets Loaded with Self-Nanoemulsified Formulations of Various Drugs: A New Strategy for Personalized Medicine.

Pharmaceutics 2021 Oct 19;13(10). Epub 2021 Oct 19.

Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia.

This work aimed to develop a three-dimensional printed (3DP) tablet containing glimepiride (GLMP) and/or rosuvastatin (RSV) for treatment of dyslipidemia in patients with diabetes. Curcumin oil was extracted from the dried rhizomes of and utilized to develop a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS). Screening mixture experimental design was conducted to develop SNEDDS formulation with a minimum droplet size. Five different semi-solid pastes were prepared and rheologically characterized. The prepared pastes were used to develop 3DP tablets using extrusion printing. The quality attributes of the 3DP tablets were evaluated. A non-compartmental extravascular pharmacokinetic model was implemented to investigate the in vivo behavior of the prepared tablets and the studied marketed products. The optimized SNEDDS, of a 94.43 ± 3.55 nm droplet size, was found to contain 15%, 75%, and 10% of oil, polyethylene glycol 400, and tween 80, respectively. The prepared pastes revealed a shear-thinning of pseudoplastic flow behavior. Flat-faced round tablets of 15 mm diameter and 5.6-11.2 mm thickness were successfully printed and illustrated good criteria for friability, weight variation, and content uniformity. Drug release was superior from SNEDDS-based tablets when compared to non-SNEDDS tablets. Scanning electron microscopy study of the 3DP tablets revealed a semi-porous surface that exhibited some curvature with the appearance of tortuosity and a gel porous-like structure of the inner section. GLMP and RSV demonstrated relative bioavailability of 159.50% and 245.16%, respectively. Accordingly, the developed 3DP tablets could be considered as a promising combined oral drug therapy used in treatment of metabolic disorders. However, clinical studies are needed to investigate their efficacy and safety.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics13101733DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8539993PMC
October 2021

Impact of Site-Specific Bioconjugation on the Interfacial Activity of a Protein Biosurfactant.

Langmuir 2019 10 8;35(42):13588-13594. Epub 2019 Oct 8.

The University of Queensland , Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology , St. Lucia , QLD 4072 , Australia.

Biosurfactants are surface active molecules that can be produced by renewable, industrially scalable biologic processes. DAMP4, a designer biosurfactant, enables the modification of interfaces via genetic or chemical fusion to functional moieties. However, bioconjugation of addressable amines introduces heterogeneity that limits the precision of functionalization as well as the resolution of interfacial characterization. Here, we designed DAMP4 variants with cysteine point mutations to allow for site-specific bioconjugation. The DAMP4 variants were shown to retain the structural stability and interfacial activity characteristic of the parent molecule, while permitting efficient and specific conjugation of polyethylene glycol (PEG). PEGylation results in a considerable reduction on the interfacial activity of both single and double mutants. Comparison of conjugates with one or two conjugation sites shows that both the number of conjugates as well as the mass of conjugated material impact the interfacial activity of DAMP4. As a result, the ability of DAMP4 variants with multiple PEG conjugates to impart colloidal stability on peptide-stabilized emulsions is reduced. We suggest that this is due to steric constraints on the structures of amphiphilic helices at the interface. Specific and efficient bioconjugation permits the exploration and investigation of the interfacial properties of designer protein biosurfactants with molecular precision. Our findings should therefore inform the design and modification of biosurfactants for their increasing use in industrial processes and nutritional and pharmaceutical formulations.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.9b01684DOI Listing
October 2019

Nanoemulsions in drug delivery: formulation to medical application.

Nanomedicine (Lond) 2018 10 28;13(19):2507-2525. Epub 2018 Sep 28.

Australian Institute for Bioengineering & Nanotechnology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia.

Nanoscale oil-in-water emulsions (NEs), heterogeneous systems of two immiscible liquids stabilized by emulsifiers or surfactants, show great potential in medical applications because of their attractive characteristics for drug delivery. NEs have been explored as therapeutic carriers for hydrophobic compounds via various routes of administration. NEs provide opportunities to improve drug delivery via alternative administration routes. However, deep understanding of the NE manufacturing and functionalization fundamentals, and how they relate to the choice of administration route and pharmacological profile is still needed to ease the clinical translation of NEs. Here, we review the diversity of medical applications for NEs and how that governs their formulation, route of administration, and the emergence of increasing sophistication in NE design for specific application.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/nnm-2018-0088DOI Listing
October 2018

Using elongated microparticles to enhance tailorable nanoemulsion delivery in excised human skin and volunteers.

J Control Release 2018 10 15;288:264-276. Epub 2018 Sep 15.

Future Industries Institute, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia; Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Translational Research Institute at the Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. Electronic address:

This study demonstrates, for the first time, clinical testing of elongated silica microparticles (EMP) combined with tailorable nanoemulsions (TNE) to enhance topical delivery of hydrophobic drug surrogates. Likewise, this is the first report of 6-carboxyfluorescein (a model molecule for topically delivered hydrophobic drugs) AM1 & DAMP4 (novel short peptide surfactants) used in volunteers. The EMP penetrates through the epidermis and stop at the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ). TNE are unusually stable and useful because the oil core allows high drug loading levels and the surface properties can be easily controlled. At first, we chose alginate as a crosslinking agent between EMP and TNE. We initially incorporated a fluorescent lipophilic dye, DiI, as a hydrophobic drug surrogate into TNE for visualization with microscopy. We compared four different coating approaches to combine EMP and TNE and tested these formulations in freshly excised human skin. The delivery profile characterisation was imaged by dye- free coherent anti-Stoke Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy to detect the core droplet of TNE that was packed with pharmaceutical grade lipid (glycerol) instead of DiI. These data show the EMP penetrating to the DEJ followed by controlled release of the TNE. Freeze-dried formulations with crosslinking resulted in a sustained release profile, whereas a freeze-dried formulation without crosslinking showed an immediate burst-type release profile. Finally, we tested the crosslinked TNE coated EMP formulation in volunteers using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) and fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to document the penetration depth characteristics. These forms of microscopy have limitations in terms of image acquisition speed and imaging area coverage but can detect fluorescent drug delivery through the superficial skin in volunteers. 6-Carboxyfluorescein was selected as the fluorescent drug surrogate for the volunteer study based on the similarity of size, charge and hydrophobicity characteristics to small therapeutic drugs that are difficult to deliver through skin. The imaging data showed a 6-carboxyfluorescein signal deep in volunteer skin supporting the hypothesis that EMP can indeed enhance the delivery of TNE in human skin. There were no adverse events recorded at the time of the study or after the study, supporting the use of 6-carboxyfluorescein as a safe and detectable drug surrogate for topical drug research. In conclusion, dry formulations, with controllable release profiles can be obtained with TNE coated EMP that can effectively enhance hydrophobic payload delivery deep into the human epidermis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jconrel.2018.09.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7050638PMC
October 2018

Insights into the interfacial structure-function of poly(ethylene glycol)-decorated peptide-stabilised nanoscale emulsions.

Soft Matter 2017 Nov;13(43):7953-7961

The University of Queensland, Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia.

The interfacial properties of nanoscale materials have profound influence on biodistribution and stability as well as the effectiveness of sophisticated surface-encoded properties such as active targeting to cell surface receptors. Tailorable nanocarrier emulsions (TNEs) are a novel class of oil-in-water emulsions stabilised by molecularly-engineered biosurfactants that permit single-pot stepwise surface modification with related polypeptides that may be chemically conjugated or genetically fused to biofunctional moieties. We have probed the structure and function of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) used to decorate TNEs in this way. The molecular weight of PEG decorating TNEs has considerable impact on the ζ-potential of the emulsion particles, related to differential interfacial thickness of the PEG layer as determined by X-ray reflectometry. By co-modifying TNEs with an antibody fragment, we show that the molecular weight and density of PEG governs the competing parameters of accessibility of the targeting moiety and of shielding the interface from non-specific interactions with the environment. The fundamental understanding of the molecular details of the PEG layer that we present provides valuable insights into the structure-function relationship for soft nanomaterial interfaces. This work therefore paves the way for further rational design of TNEs and other nanocarriers that must interact with their environment in controlled and predictable ways.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c7sm01614jDOI Listing
November 2017

Smart functional nucleic acid chimeras: enabling tissue specific RNA targeting therapy.

RNA Biol 2015 ;12(4):412-25

a Nucleic Acid Center; Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy ; University of Southern Denmark ; Odense , Denmark.

A major obstacle for effective utilization of therapeutic oligonucleotides such as siRNA, antisense, antimiRs etc. is to deliver them specifically to the target tissues. Toward this goal, nucleic acid aptamers are re-emerging as a prominent class of biomolecules capable of delivering target specific therapy and therapeutic monitoring by various molecular imaging modalities. This class of short oligonucleotide ligands with high affinity and specificity are selected from a large nucleic acid pool against a molecular target of choice. Poor cellular uptake of therapeutic oligonucleotides impedes gene-targeting efficacy in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, aptamer-oligonucleotide chimeras have shown the capacity to deliver siRNA, antimiRs, small molecule drugs etc. toward various targets and showed very promising results in various studies on different diseases models. However, to further improve the bio-stability of such chimeric conjugates, it is important to introduce chemically-modified nucleic acid analogs. In this review, we highlight the applications of nucleic acid aptamers for target specific delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15476286.2015.1017234DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4615226PMC
January 2016
-->