Publications by authors named "Horacio Pérez-España"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Genetic connectivity of lionfish () in marine protected areas of the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea.

Ecol Evol 2020 May 16;10(9):3844-3855. Epub 2020 Apr 16.

Laboratorio de Ecología de Ecosistemas de Arrecifes Coralinos Departamento de Recursos del Mar Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del I.P.N.- Unidad Mérida Mérida México.

Lionfish () have rapidly invaded the tropical Atlantic and spread across the wider Caribbean in a relatively short period of time. Because of its high invasion capacity, we used it as a model to identify the connectivity among nine marine protected areas (MPAs) situated in four countries in the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea. This study provides evidence of local genetic differentiation of in the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea. A total of 475 lionfish samples were characterized with 12 microsatellites, with 6-20 alleles per locus. Departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) were found in 10 of the 12 loci, all caused by heterozygous excess. Moderate genetic differentiation was observed between Chiriviche, Venezuela and Xcalak, México localities ( = 0.012), and between the Los Roques and the Veracruz ( = 0.074) sites. STRUCTURE analysis found that four genetic entities best fit our data. A unique genetic group in the Gulf of Mexico may imply that the lionfish invasion unfolded both in a counterclockwise manner in the Gulf of Mexico. In spite of the notable dispersion of , our results show some genetic structure, as do other noninvasive Caribbean fish species, suggesting that the connectivity in some MPAs analyzed in the Caribbean is limited and caused by only a few source individuals with subsequent genetic drift leading to local genetic differentiation. This indicates that dispersion could be caused by mesoscale phenomena, which produce stochastic connectivity pulses. Due to the isolation of some MPAs from others, these findings may hold a promise for local short-term control of by means of intensive fishing, even in MPAs, and may have regional long-term effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.5829DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7244795PMC
May 2020

An update to the inventory of shore-fishes from the Parque Nacional Sistema Arrecifal Veracruzano, Veracruz, México.

Zookeys 2019 23;882:127-157. Epub 2019 Oct 23.

150 Nautilus Drive Islamorada, Florida 33036, USA Unaffiliated Isla Morada United States of America.

Data on marine and brackish-water fishes recorded in the area of the Parque Nacional Sistema Arrecifal Veracruzano in the southwest Gulf of Mexico were extracted from online aggregators of georeferenced location records, the recent ichthyological literature reviewed, and collections and observations made to provide a more complete faunal inventory for that park. Those actions added 95 species to a comprehensive inventory published in 2013, and brought the total to 472 species, an increase of 22%. Seventy-four percent of the additions came from online aggregators of georeferenced species records, which clearly demonstrates the value of reviewing and incorporating such data into species inventories. However, different aggregators recorded different sets of species, and some of their data were linked to outdated taxonomy or included identification errors. Hence individual records from multiple aggregators need to be obtained and reviewed for such issues when using such data to compile and revise faunal inventories. Existing lists also need to be carefully reviewed to ensure that errors are not perpetuated during updates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/zookeys.882.38449DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6821827PMC
October 2019

Corrigendum to "Urban sewage lipids in the suspended particulate matter of a coral reef under river influence in the South West Gulf of Mexico" [Water Res. 123 (2017) 192-205].

Water Res 2017 12;126:530

Instituto de Ciencias Marinas y Pesquerías, Universidad Veracruzana, Calle Hidalgo 617, Colonia Río Jamapa, Boca del Río, Veracruz, Mexico.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2017.10.026DOI Listing
December 2017

Urban sewage lipids in the suspended particulate matter of a coral reef under river influence in the South West Gulf of Mexico.

Water Res 2017 10 22;123:192-205. Epub 2017 Jun 22.

Instituto de Ciencias Marinas y Pesquerías, Universidad Veracruzana, Calle Hidalgo 617, Colonia Río Jamapa, Boca del Río, Veracruz, Mexico.

Nutritional quality of suspended particulate matter (SPM) and the degree of human fecal pollution in the largest coral reef system in the southwest Gulf of Mexico were evaluated using lipid classes, fatty acids (FA) and sterols in the dry and rainy seasons. High proportions of triacylglycerols and saturated and monounsaturated FA were detected in the SPM however it was considered poor quality because it had low proportions of highly unsaturated FA which can be used to determine production of marine biogenic material of dietary value to pelagic and benthic organisms. Urban sewage organic carbon was traced with coprostanol. The reference value of coprostanol from the point source of pollution was set using two samples from a sewage treatment plant processing waste from >140,000 people near the coral reef system, and it was contrasted with one river station and nine marine stations including six coral reefs. The concentration of coprostanol in the SPM was 3621 ± 98 ng L comprising 26% of total sterols. During the dry season, the river was contaminated upstream with human feces as evidenced by coprostanol at 1823 ng L, the 5β-coprostanol: cholesterol ratio at 0.5, and 5β-coprostanol: [5α-cholestanol+5β-coprostanol] at 0.7. In contrast, marine stations had concentrations of coprostanol lower than a suggested regulation limit for tropical marine coastal waters (30 ng L), ranging between 6 and 28 ng L. During the rainy season a dilution effect was detected in the river, however significantly higher concentrations of coprostanol in the marine stations were detected ranging between 15 and 215 ng L, higher than the tentative tropical regulation range (30-100 ng L). Among the reefs, the nearshore one, 14.3 km from the treatment plant, was more exposed to human-fecal pollution, and offshore reefs, >17.3 km from the plant, had a lower degree of contamination. Finally, only three stations were clearly uncontaminated during both seasons including two reefs in the south located 21.8 and 35.6 km from the plant, with no presence of coprostanol. Contamination in the rainy season likely comes from a village with untreated sewage located 9.3-32 km from the reefs, and from the second largest Mexican river flowing into the Gulf of Mexico which has a watershed covering three states with lower than average sewage treatment. Inclusion of coprostanol monitoring could be a key factor in the management of this coral reef system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2017.06.061DOI Listing
October 2017

The fishes of Cayo Arcas (Campeche Bank, Gulf of Mexico): an updated checklist.

Zookeys 2016 13(640):139-155. Epub 2016 Dec 13.

Unidad Multidisciplinaria en Docencia e Investigación de Sisal, Facultad de Ciencias, UNAM, Yucatan, México.

Cayo Arcas is a small, offshore reef complex on the southwest corner of Campeche Bank, Gulf of Mexico. The only published information (from 2000) on the fishes of that reef refers to 37 species. Here additional information is added, some from unpublished observations during the 1980s, as well as author observations made during 2013 and 2016. These bring the checklist of that reef's fishes up to 162 species. The possible effects of the limited number of fish habitats available at Cayo Arcas on the composition of its fish fauna are discussed. The Indo-Pacific damselfish (Bleeker, 1856) was first recorded in the Atlantic in mid-2013, on shoreline reefs in the southwest corner of the Gulf of Mexico. Recently reviewed underwater photographs show that also was present at Cayo Arcas in mid-2013, 350 km from the first-record site. Hence it evidently had a substantial population in the southwest Gulf of Mexico in 2013, and must have arrived in there long before that year.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/zookeys.640.10862DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5240370PMC
December 2016

[Spatial distribution and ecological structure of Thalassia testudinum (Hydrocharitaceae) in two reefs of Veracruz Reef System National Park, Mexico].

Rev Biol Trop 2016 Jun;64(2):427-48

Seagrasses in coastal environments have been threatened by increased human activities; these have negatively altered processes and environmental services, and have decreased grassland areas. The aim of this study was to generate knowledge of Thalassia testudinum distribution, state of the structure and fragmentation level in two reefs of the Veracruz Reef System National Park (PNSAV). Two different reefs were selected: Sacrificios in the North and near the coast, and Cabezo in the South and away from the coast. Shoot-specific and area-specific characteristics of submerged macrophytes meadows present were determined, and four morpho-functional groups were identified. Significant differences between plant coverage were tested through nonparametric ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis test. A supervised classification of spatial high-resolution image verified with field data was performed (55 Sacrificios and 290 Cabezo). The fragmentation level was calculated using landscape metrics, class level and thematic maps were made based on four covers. The meadows were dominated by Thalassia testudinum; maximum densities were 208 shoot/m2 in Cabezo, and 176 shoot/m2 in Sacrificios. Cabezo presented grasses with short (9 cm) and thin leaves (0.55 cm) on average; while Sacrificios showed longer (23.5 cm) and thicker (1 cm) leaves. Sacrificios showed lower fragmentation degree than Cabezo; in both cases, the vegetation cover fragmentation corresponded to less than 50 %. Although Cabezo reef presents further fragmentation, which creates a large number of microenvironments, being recognized for its importance as recruitment area. This work serves as a baseline for the creation of an adequate management plan (formation of a core area of Cabezo). It is necessary to complement this work with new efforts for the recognition of seagrass prairies in all PNSAV reefs, as well as periodic monitoring and recognition of ecosystem services. .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15517/rbt.v64i2.19810DOI Listing
June 2016