Publications by authors named "Hongting Hua"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Assessment of the necessity of frontal sinostomy in cases of frontal sinusitis associated with fungus ball of the maxillary sinus.

Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2021 Jun 15. Epub 2021 Jun 15.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Jixi Road 218, Hefei, 230022, Anhui, China.

Purpose: This study was conducted to evaluate outcomes in patients presenting with fungus ball of the maxillary sinus (MSFB) and frontal sinusitis who were treated via middle meatal antrostomy alone.

Methods: This was a randomized, controlled study with a parallel group design. Patients with MSFB and frontal sinusitis were randomly assigned to the maxillary middle meatal antrostomy (MMMA) or control (MMMA + frontal sinusotomy) groups. Patient demographics, complaints, imaging findings were analyzed, and surgical outcomes were evaluated using the Lund-Kennedy endoscopic score (LKES) and the 22-item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT-22) questionnaire.

Results: In total, 40 patients were separated into two groups, with similar symptoms including nasal obstruction, mucopurulent rhinorrhea, maxillary or frontal pain, blood stained nasal discharge, nasal cacosmia and orbital pain being observed in both groups. Total LKES and SNOT-22 scores were significantly improved in both groups at 6 months post-treatment, with no significant differences in these scores between groups within a mean 6.8-month follow-up.

Conclusion: These results suggest that frontal sinusotomy is not required to resolve frontal sinusitis associated with MSFB. As such frontal sinusitis appears to be a reactive process caused by fungal ball obstruction, it regresses spontaneously following fungus ball removal, drainage of the maxillary sinus, and middle meatal antrostomy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00405-021-06933-zDOI Listing
June 2021

The long-term outcomes of posterior nasal neurectomy with or without pharyngeal neurectomy in patients with allergic rhinitis: a randomized controlled trial.

Braz J Otorhinolaryngol 2021 May 29. Epub 2021 May 29.

First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Hefei, Anhui, China. Electronic address:

Introduction: Allergic rhinitis is a form of IgE mediated inflammation of the nasal mucosa in response to specific allergens, resulting in typical symptoms.

Objectives: This study was designed with the primary goal of comparing the clinical efficacy of posterior nasal neurectomy with or without pharyngeal neurectomy for the treatment of moderate-to-severe perennial allergic rhinitis. Secondary study aims included a comparison of the severity of comorbidities, including chronic cough and asthma, between patients in these two surgical treatment groups.

Methods: A total of 52 patients were enrolled in this randomized controlled trial and were assigned to either the control group (posterior nasal neurectomy) or the experimental group (posterior nasal neurectomy + pharyngeal neurectomy). The visual analog scale and rhinoconjunctivitis quality of life questionnaire were used to compare the differences in patient symptoms between baseline and 6-, 12-, and 24-months post-treatment. In addition, patient cough and asthma symptoms were monitored during follow-up via visual analog scale and asthma control test respectively.

Results: No significant differences in preoperative scores were evident between groups (p > 0.05). At 6-months post-treatment, there were significant differences in visual analog scale, rhinoconjunctivitis quality of life questionnaire, and asthma control test scores relative to baseline values in experimental group and control group patients (p < 0.05), and this remained true upon 12- and 24-month follow-up. No significant differences in visual analog scale, rhinoconjunctivitis quality of life questionnaire, or asthma control test scores were observed between the two treatment groups at any postoperative follow-up time point (p > 0.05), while coughing severity was found to be significantly reduced in the experimental group relative to the control group (p < 0.05).

Conclusion: posterior nasal neurectomy can be safely implemented with or without pharyngeal neurectomy in order to effectively treat allergic rhinitis. Combined posterior nasal neurectomy and pharyngeal neurectomy treatment may offer greater value than posterior nasal neurectomy alone for the treatment of allergic rhinitis patients with chronic cough.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjorl.2021.05.006DOI Listing
May 2021