Publications by authors named "Hongfang Tuo"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Rare primary hepatic carcinosarcoma composed of hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, and sarcoma: a case report.

J Int Med Res 2021 Oct;49(10):3000605211050539

Department of Hepatobiliary, Pancreatic, and Splenic Surgery, 117872Hebei General Hospital, Hebei General Hospital, Shijiazhuang, China.

Primary hepatic carcinosarcoma (HCS) is an extremely rare malignant tumor of the liver that contains carcinomatous and sarcomatous components. The diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of HCS pose great challenges to clinicians. Herein, we present a case of HCS in a 67-year-old man with unique pathological manifestation. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging showed a malignant lesion in the right liver and a small sub-focus in the left liver. Radical treatment was performed, including excision of the right posterior lobe of the liver, thrombectomy of the right posterior portal vein, and radiofrequency ablation of lesions in the left liver. The specimens were confirmed to be HCS by pathological examinations, which revealed a combination of poorly differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma, moderately differentiated cholangiocellular carcinoma, and spindle cell sarcoma. Transhepatic arterial chemotherapy and embolization was performed after surgery. Unfortunately, pulmonary metastasis occurred 1.5 months later, which meant a poor prognosis. In this report, we discuss the clinicopathological characteristics of this case and factors that affected surgical outcomes, which may add some ideas for the future diagnosis and treatment of HCS patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/03000605211050539DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8516393PMC
October 2021

Reg3A (regenerating family member 3 alpha) acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting DMBT1 (deleted in malignant brain tumors 1) in gastric cancer.

Bioengineered 2021 Dec;12(1):7644-7655

Department of Surgery, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China.

Regenerating family member 3 alpha (Reg3A) encodes a pancreatic secretory protein that may be involved in cell proliferation or differentiation. However, the function and downstream regulatory mechanism of Reg3A in gastric cancer (GC) remains elusive. This study aimed to clarify the function and mechanism of Reg3A regulating cell proliferation in GC. The expression levels of Reg3A were confirmed in GC patients and cells using qRT-PCR and western blotting. TCGA datasets and clinical samples were used to explore the correlation between Reg3A and clinicopathologic features in GC. Cell viability, colony formation, and xenograft tumorigenesis assays were performed to detect the function of Reg3A on cell proliferation. Besides, we predicted the correlated genes of Reg3A by analyzing TCGA datasets, and further investigated the downstream regulatory mechanism of Reg3A in GC. Our results demonstrated that Reg3A is down-regulated in and (P < 0.05). Reg3A expression are negatively correlated with TNM classification ( < 0.001), lymph node ( < 0.001) in GC. Reg3A significantly suppresses cell proliferation in GC (P < 0.05). Bioinformatic analysis and experimental results confirmed that Reg3A positively regulates the expression of deleted in malignant brain tumor 1 (DMBT1, < 0.05). Besides, Reg3A and DMBT1 all prolong the overall survival (OS, < 0.01), post-progression survival (PPS, < 0.05), and first progression survival (FP, < 0.01). The function of Reg3A inhibiting cell proliferation is abolished by DMBT1 siRNA in GC ( < 0.05). In conclusion, Reg3A may act as a novel tumor suppressor by promoting DMBT1 expression, which may be a potential therapeutic target in patients with GC.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21655979.2021.1981800DOI Listing
December 2021

Current perspectives on exosomes in the diagnosis and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (review).

Cancer Biol Ther 2021 04 13;22(4):279-290. Epub 2021 Apr 13.

Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, General Hospital, Shijiazhuang, Hebei, P. R. China.

The prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a malignant tumor, is poor. Tumor recurrence and metastasis are the major challenges for the treatment of HCC. Various studies have demonstrated that exosomes, which are loaded with various biomolecules including nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins are involved in the recurrence and metastasis of HCC. Additionally, exosomes mediate various biological processes, such as immune response, cell apoptosis, angiogenesis, thrombosis, autophagy, and intercellular signal transduction. In cancer, exosomes regulate cancer cell differentiation, development, and drug resistance. Circular RNAs, microRNAs, and proteins in the exosomes can serve as early diagnostic and prognostic markers for HCC. As exosomes are characterized by low immunogenicity and high stability in the tissues and circulation, they can be used to deliver the drugs in cancer therapies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15384047.2021.1898728DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8183537PMC
April 2021

Gallbladder gangrene after percutaneous vertebroplasty, an uncommon presentation of vascular complication: a case report and analysis of the causes.

J Int Med Res 2021 Mar;49(3):3000605211001720

Department of Hepatobiliary, Pancreatic, and Splenic Surgery, 117872Hebei General Hospital, Shijiazhuang, China.

We present a case of an 81-year-old man with gallbladder gangrene after percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) that was successfully treated via laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). The patient underwent multilevel, thoracic PV for painful osteoporotic compression fractures. PV performed at the T6 level was complicated by severe abdominal pain owing to direct embolization of the right T6 segmental artery with penetration of bone cement into the radicular artery beneath the pedicle. Cement leakage, especially arterial embolization of cement into the general circulation, is a known potential complication following PV. Serious complications related to PV augmentation procedures, such as vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty, are rare and most often result from local cement leakage or venous embolization. Combined with this case report, we reviewed the literature regarding the unusual occurrence of direct arterial cement embolization during PV and analyzed the causes to alert clinicians to this potentially rare vascular complication.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/03000605211001720DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8020101PMC
March 2021

Role of chemokines in hepatocellular carcinoma (Review).

Oncol Rep 2021 03 22;45(3):809-823. Epub 2020 Dec 22.

Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Hebei General Hospital, Shijiazhuang, Hebei 050051, P.R. China.

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a prevalent malignant tumor worldwide, with an unsatisfactory prognosis, although treatments are improving. One of the main challenges for the treatment of HCC is the prevention or management of recurrence and metastasis of HCC. It has been found that chemokines and their receptors serve a pivotal role in HCC progression. In the present review, the literature on the multifactorial roles of exosomes in HCC from PubMed, Cochrane library and Embase were obtained, with a specific focus on the functions and mechanisms of chemokines in HCC. To date, >50 chemokines have been found, which can be divided into four families: CXC, CX3C, CC and XC, according to the different positions of the conserved N‑terminal cysteine residues. Chemokines are involved in the inflammatory response, tumor immune response, proliferation, invasion and metastasis via modulation of various signaling pathways. Thus, chemokines and their receptors directly or indirectly shape the tumor cell microenvironment, and regulate the biological behavior of the tumor. In addition, the potential application of chemokines in chemotaxis of exosomes as drug vehicles is discussed. Exosomes containing chemokines or expressing receptors for chemokines may improve chemotaxis to HCC and may thus be exploited for targeted drug delivery.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/or.2020.7906DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7859922PMC
March 2021

Anatomic study of the superior right colic vein: its relevance to pancreatic and colonic surgery.

Am J Surg 2006 Jan;191(1):100-3

First Department of Surgery, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2 Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611, Japan.

Background: This study was designed to describe the precise anatomic venous tributaries of the superior mesenteric vein with special emphasis on the superior right colic vein (SRCV), which is seldom mentioned in the literature.

Methods: Nine adult cadavers were dissected to define the venous tributaries of the superior mesenteric vein. The SRCV, middle colic vein, and right colic vein (RCV) were defined as those that drained from the marginal vein of the right flexure of the colon, the transverse colon, and the ascending colon, respectively.

Results: The SRCV was observed to drain from the right flexure of the colon to the confluence of the right gastroepiploic and superior pancreaticoduodenal veins and present the gastrocolic trunk of Henle (GTH) in 8 of 9 cases. The RCV terminated into the GTH in 4 cases. The SRCV, the RCV, and the middle colic vein formed a confluence and entered into the GTH in 1 case.

Conclusions: The SRCV exits and drains from the right colonic flexure to the GTH in 89% of cases.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2005.10.009DOI Listing
January 2006

Distribution of lymphatic vessels in the neural plexuses surrounding the superior mesenteric artery.

Pancreas 2006 Jan;32(1):62-6

First Department of Surgery, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Objectives: To investigate whether lymphatic vessels exist in the neural plexuses surrounding the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and the ultrastructural relationship between neural plexuses and lymphatic vessels.

Methods: A total of 970 serial sections including the structure surrounding the SMA were obtained from 9 cadavers. They were subjected to conventional hematoxylin/eosin staining and immunostaining for the lymphatic marker D2-40. Epithelial membrane antigen and S100 were also immunostained to identify the perineurium and nerve bundles, respectively.

Results: Thin-walled, erythrocyte-free vessels staining with lymphatic markers (D2-40) were found in the neural plexuses surrounding the SMA along a full circumference. There seemed to be a distribution correlation between lymphatic vessels and neural plexuses. Lymphatic vessels were not identified within the nerve bundles. The plexuses contained no lymph nodes in any sections.

Conclusions: To our knowledge we report the immunohistochemical visualization of lymphatic vessels in peri-SMA neural plexuses for the first time. Therefore, particular attention should be paid to the lymphatic vessels within neural plexuses as a possible route of invasion and the source of pancreatic cancer recurrence.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.mpa.0000194607.16982.d7DOI Listing
January 2006

Effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on neutrophils and inflammatory cytokines in the early stage of severe acute pancreatitis in rats.

J Gastroenterol 2005 Feb;40(2):186-91

The First Department of Surgery, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2 Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8611, Japan.

Background: The high mortality rate of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is closely associated with secondary infections of pancreatic and peripancreatic tissues. It was reported that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) increased the number of leukocytes and enhanced their functions. However, an inflammatory response may be enhanced by an increased number of leukocytes. Our purpose was to study the roles of G-CSF in peritoneal-exudate neutrophils and inflammatory cytokines in the early stage of experimental SAP.

Methods: SAP was induced by injecting 0.2 ml of 3% taurocholate acid into the biliopancreatic duct in male Wistar rats. G-CSF (90 microg/kg body weight) or saline was administered 1 h before the SAP induction. The number of neutrophils and their phagocytic and bactericidal activities were evaluated, and the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-1beta in plasma and ascitic fluid were measured 1 h and 3 h after the SAP induction.

Results: The number of peritoneal-exudate neutrophils (PENs) at 3 h was increased by G-CSF administration (81 +/- 50 x 10(5) cells/total exudate), as compared with that shown with saline administration (28 +/- 13 x 10(5) cells/total exudate; P < 0.05). The numbers of phagocytic and bactericidal neutrophils were also elevated by G-CSF administration. G-CSF administration did not increase the concentrations of TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-1beta in the plasma and ascitic fluid.

Conclusions: G-CSF increases the numbers of neutrophils and enhances their functions against bacteria, but it does not enhance intraabdominal and systemic inflammatory responses in the early stage of SAP.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00535-004-1515-6DOI Listing
February 2005

Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on opsonin receptor expression in cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

Pancreas 2005 Jan;30(1):e16-21

First Department of Surgery, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Objectives: Decreased levels of expression of opsonin receptors (CD11b and CD32/16) on peritoneal exudate neutrophils may lead to susceptibility to infection. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) increases the expression levels of CD11b on neutrophils and prolongs neutrophil survival. The effects of G-CSF on neutrophils and opsonin receptor expressions of neutrophils were investigated in cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

Methods: Forty-two mice were randomly assigned to each group (n = 6). Mice received subcutaneous G-CSF (120 microg/kg body weight) before the induction of acute pancreatitis with cerulein. Saline was used for instead of G-CSF or cerulein solution in control groups. CD11b and CD32/16 expression levels on circulatory and peritoneal exudate neutrophils were investigated 6 and 24 hours after the induction of acute pancreatitis.

Results: Treatment with G-CSF did not aggravate the inflammation of pancreatic tissue evaluated by plasma amylase, acinar necrosis. However, it significantly increased the number of peritoneal exudate neutrophils (P < 0.05) and the CD11b- (P < 0.05) and CD32/16-positive (P < 0.05) peritoneal exudate neutrophils in mice with cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. The means of fluorescence intensity for CD11b and CD32/16 expressions on circulatory and peritoneal exudate neutrophils were also elevated in the G-CSF groups.

Conclusion: G-CSF administration increases the numbers of neutrophils and improves expression levels of opsonin receptors on neutrophils in mice with cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2005
-->