Dr. Hongchang Cui, PhD - Florida State University - Associate Professor

Dr. Hongchang Cui

PhD

Florida State University

Associate Professor

Tallahassee, FL | United States

Main Specialties: Biology

Additional Specialties: Plant Developmental Biology, Molecular Genetics, Genomics, Epigenomics

Dr. Hongchang Cui, PhD - Florida State University - Associate Professor

Dr. Hongchang Cui

PhD

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: Florida State University - Tallahassee, FL , United States

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:

Publications

18Publications

123Reads

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409PubMed Central Citations

Middle Cortex Formation in the Root: An Emerging Picture of Integrated Regulatory Mechanisms.

Authors:
Hongchang Cui

Mol Plant 2016 06 19;9(6):771-3. Epub 2016 May 19.

Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molp.2016.05.002DOI Listing
June 2016
4 Reads
6.340 Impact Factor

Cortex proliferation in the root is a protective mechanism against abiotic stress.

Authors:
Hongchang Cui

Plant Signal Behav 2015 ;10(5):e1011949

a Department of Biological Science; Florida State University ; Tallahassee , FL USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15592324.2015.1011949DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4622999PMC
March 2016
4 Reads
2 Citations

The WUSCHEL Related Homeobox Protein WOX7 Regulates the Sugar Response of Lateral Root Development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

Mol Plant 2016 Feb 24;9(2):261-270. Epub 2015 Nov 24.

Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molp.2015.11.006DOI Listing
February 2016
4 Reads
7 Citations
6.340 Impact Factor

SPINDLY, ERECTA, and its ligand STOMAGEN have a role in redox-mediated cortex proliferation in the Arabidopsis root.

Mol Plant 2014 Dec 29;7(12):1727-39. Epub 2014 Sep 29.

Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4295, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/mp/ssu106DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4261839PMC
December 2014
13 Reads
4 Citations
6.340 Impact Factor

SPINDLY, ERECTA and its ligand STOMAGEN have a role in redox-mediated cortex proliferation in the Arabidopsis root

doi: 10.1093/mp/ssu106

Mol Plant

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are harmful to all living organisms and therefore they must be removed to ensure normal growth and development. ROS are also signaling molecules, but so far little is known about the mechanisms of ROS perception and developmental response in plants. We here report that hydrogen peroxide induces cortex proliferation in the Arabidopsis root and that SPINDLY (SPY), an O-linked glucosamine acetyltransferase, regulates cortex proliferation by maintaining cellular redox homeostasis. We also found that mutation in the leucine-rich receptor kinase ERECTA and its putative peptide ligand STOMAGEN block the effect of hydrogen peroxide on root cortex proliferation. However, ERECTA and STOMAGEN are expressed in the vascular tissue, whereas extra cortex cells are produced from the endodermis, suggesting the involvement of intercellular signaling. SPY appears to act downstream of ERECTA, because the spy mutation still caused cortex proliferation in the erecta mutant background. We therefore have not only gained insight into the mechanism by which SPY regulates root development but also uncovered a novel pathway for ROS signaling in plants. The importance of redox-mediated cortex proliferation as a protective mechanism against oxidative stress is also discussed.

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September 2014
2 Reads

SCARECROW, SCR-LIKE 23 and SHORT-ROOT control bundle sheath cell fate and function in Arabidopsis thaliana.

Plant J 2014 Apr 26;78(2):319-27. Epub 2014 Mar 26.

Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, 32306-4295, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tpj.12470DOI Listing
April 2014
3 Reads
11 Citations
5.972 Impact Factor

Identification of bundle sheath cell fate factors provides new tools for C3-to-C4 engineering.

Plant Signal Behav 2014 Jan 1;9. Epub 2014 Jan 1.

Department of Biological Science; Florida State University; Tallahassee, FL USA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4203720PMC
January 2014
11 Reads
1 Citation

Killing two birds with one stone: transcriptional regulators coordinate development and stress responses in plants.

Authors:
Hongchang Cui

Plant Signal Behav 2012 Jun 14;7(6):701-3. Epub 2012 May 14.

Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4161/psb.20283DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3442873PMC
June 2012
2 Reads
3 Citations

SCARECROW has a SHORT-ROOT-independent role in modulating the sugar response.

Plant Physiol 2012 Apr 6;158(4):1769-78. Epub 2012 Feb 6.

Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4295, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1104/pp.111.191502DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3320184PMC
April 2012
3 Reads
16 Citations
6.841 Impact Factor

SHORT-ROOT regulates vascular patterning, but not apical meristematic activity in the Arabidopsis root through cytokinin homeostasis.

Plant Signal Behav 2012 Mar 1;7(3):314-7. Epub 2012 Mar 1.

Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4161/psb.19118DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3443909PMC
March 2012
28 Reads
3 Citations

Genome-wide direct target analysis reveals a role for SHORT-ROOT in root vascular patterning through cytokinin homeostasis.

Plant Physiol 2011 Nov 27;157(3):1221-31. Epub 2011 Sep 27.

Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4295, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1104/pp.111.183178DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3252171PMC
November 2011
2 Reads
17 Citations
6.841 Impact Factor

Cell identity regulators link development and stress responses in the Arabidopsis root.

Dev Cell 2011 Oct;21(4):770-82

Department of Biology and Institute for Genome Science and Policy Center for Systems Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devcel.2011.09.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3204215PMC
October 2011
2 Reads
52 Citations
9.710 Impact Factor

Spatiotemporal regulation of cell-cycle genes by SHORT-ROOT links patterning and growth

Nature 466: 128-132.

Nature

The development of multicellular organisms relies on the coordinated control of cell divisions leading to proper patterning and growth1, 2, 3. The molecular mechanisms underlying pattern formation, particularly the regulation of formative cell divisions, remain poorly understood. In Arabidopsis, formative divisions generating the root ground tissue are controlled by SHORTROOT (SHR) and SCARECROW (SCR)4, 5, 6. Here we show, using cell-type-specific transcriptional effects of SHR and SCR combined with data from chromatin immunoprecipitation-based microarray experiments, that SHR regulates the spatiotemporal activation of specific genes involved in cell division. Coincident with the onset of a specific formative division, SHR and SCR directly activate a D-type cyclin; furthermore, altering the expression of this cyclin resulted in formative division defects. Our results indicate that proper pattern formation is achieved through transcriptional regulation of specific cell-cycle genes in a cell-type- and developmental-stage-specific context. Taken together, we provide evidence for a direct link between developmental regulators, specific components of the cell-cycle machinery and organ patterning.

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July 2010
2 Reads

Interplay between SCARECROW, GA and LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN 1 in ground tissue patterning in the Arabidopsis root.

Plant J 2009 Jun 18;58(6):1016-27. Epub 2009 Feb 18.

Biology Department and Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy, Center for Systems Biology, Duke University, Box 90338, Durham, NC 27708, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-313X.2009.03839.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2803106PMC
June 2009
2 Reads
28 Citations
5.972 Impact Factor

Cortex proliferation: simple phenotype, complex regulatory mechanisms.

Plant Signal Behav 2009 Jun 15;4(6):551-3. Epub 2009 Jun 15.

Biology Department and IGSP Center for Systems Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-313X.2009.03839.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2688310PMC
June 2009
2 Reads
2 Citations

An evolutionarily conserved mechanism delimiting SHR movement defines a single layer of endodermis in plants.

Science 2007 Apr;316(5823):421-5

Department of Biology and Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1139531DOI Listing
April 2007
21 Reads
136 Citations
31.480 Impact Factor

Whole-genome analysis of the SHORT-ROOT developmental pathway in Arabidopsis.

PLoS Biol 2006 May 2;4(5):e143. Epub 2006 May 2.

Department of Biology and Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.0040143DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1450008PMC
May 2006
19 Reads
116 Citations

Inducible DNA demethylation mediated by the maize Suppressor-mutator transposon-encoded TnpA protein.

Plant Cell 2002 Nov;14(11):2883-99

Biology Department, Life Sciences Consortium and Plant Physiology Program, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC152734PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1105/tpc.006163DOI Listing
November 2002
3 Reads
11 Citations
9.340 Impact Factor