Dr Hong Huang, PhD - University of South Florida - Assistant Professor

Dr Hong Huang

PhD

University of South Florida

Assistant Professor

Tampa, FL | United States

Main Specialties: Other

Additional Specialties: Genomics, Informatics, Library and Information Science, Education

Dr Hong Huang, PhD - University of South Florida - Assistant Professor

Dr Hong Huang

PhD

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: University of South Florida - Tampa, FL , United States

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Publications

20Publications

228Reads

1Profile Views

95PubMed Central Citations

Women who deliver twins are more likely to smoke and have high frequencies of specific SNPs: Results from a sample of African-American women who delivered preterm, low birth weight babies.

Am J Hum Biol 2015 Sep-Oct;27(5):605-12. Epub 2015 Apr 16.

Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Av, Tampa, Florida, 33620.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajhb.22723DOI Listing
May 2016
23 Reads
1 Citation
1.700 Impact Factor

The Confidence Information Ontology: a step towards a standard for asserting confidence in annotations.

Database (Oxford) 2015 9;2015:bav043. Epub 2015 May 9.

Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland, SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland, Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Institute for Genome Sciences, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore MD, USA, SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, 1 Rue Michel Servet, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland, Department of Medicine and Institute for Genome Sciences, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore MD, USA, Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA, School of Information, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, 33647, USA, Genomics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Rd., Berkeley, 94720 CA USA, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD, UK, Swiss-Prot Group, SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Centre Medical Universitaire, Geneva, Switzerland, ETH Zurich, Department of Computer Science, Universitätstr. 19, 8092 Zürich, Switzerland, SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Universitätstr. 6, 8092 Zürich, Switzerland and University College London, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT, UK Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland, SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland, Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Institute for Genome Sciences, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore MD, USA, SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, 1 Rue Michel Servet, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland, Department of Medicine and Institute for Genome Sciences, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore MD, USA, Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA, School of Information, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, 33647, USA, Genomics Division, Lawrence Berkeley Nat

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/database/bav043DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4425939PMC
December 2015
58 Reads
7 Citations
3.372 Impact Factor

Domain knowledge and data quality perceptions in genome curation work

Authors:
Hong Huang

Journal of Documentation

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to understand genomics scientists’ perceptions in data quality assurances based on their domain knowledge. Design/methodology/approach – The study used a survey method to collect responses from 149 genomics scientists grouped by domain knowledge. They ranked the top-five quality criteria based on hypothetical curation scenarios. The results were compared using χ2 test. Findings – Scientists with domain knowledge of biology, bioinformatics, and computational science did not reach a consensus in ranking data quality criteria. Findings showed that biologists cared more about curated data that can be concise and traceable. They were also concerned about skills dealing with information overloading. Computational scientists on the other hand value making curation understandable. They paid more attention to the specific skills for data wrangling. Originality/value – This study takes a new approach in comparing the data quality perceptions for scientists across different domains of knowledge. Few studies have been able to synthesize models to interpret data quality perception across domains. The findings may help develop data quality assurance policies, training seminars, and maximize the efficiency of genome data management.

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June 2015
7 Reads

Genomics data roles, skills, and perception of data quality

Library & Information Science Research

Compared to a decade ago, genomics scientists, driven by technical changes and availability of massive genomics data, are performing a wider plurality of curation roles, including end user, curator, and dual-role user. Scientists with different curation roles (including that of end user) may focus on different data quality aspects and skill requirements in a community curation environment. This study examines how genomics scientists' perceived priorities for data quality and data quality skills differ when assuming different roles played in genomics data curation work. The analysis of survey data collected from 147 genomics scientists found that curators of genomics data valued quality criteria that can be assessed through direct examination of the data more highly, while end users placed a high value on the quality criteria that can be assessed indirectly, such as believability. With regard to data quality skills, curators appeared to care more about understanding user's requirements and specific data management skills than end users, while end users valued the skills needed to deal with information overload more highly — those needed to identify useful, relevant information from large amounts of data. Scientists with different curation roles, given common curation tasks with the same skill requirements, prioritized different data quality criteria. The data quality, skill priorities, and tradeoffs identified by this study can inform the development of effective data curation mandates and policies, data quality assurance planning and training, and the design of curation role specific tool dashboards and visualization interfaces for genomics data.

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February 2015
9 Reads

Conserved tryptophan residues within putative transmembrane domain 6 affect transport function of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1.

Mol Pharmacol 2013 Oct 15;84(4):521-7. Epub 2013 Jul 15.

College of Life Science, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China (J.H., N.L., W.H., K.Z., X.Y., M.H.); and School of Information, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida (H.H.).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1124/mol.113.085977DOI Listing
October 2013
19 Reads
4 Citations
4.130 Impact Factor

The effects of adenoviral transfection of the keratinocyte growth factor gene on epidermal stem cells: an in vitro study.

Mol Cells 2013 Oct 22;36(4):316-21. Epub 2013 Oct 22.

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Guangdong Geriatric Institute, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences and Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, 510080, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10059-013-0093-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3887989PMC
October 2013
4 Reads
1 Citation
2.090 Impact Factor

Draft Genome Sequence of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. multiplex Strain Griffin-1 from Quercus rubra in Georgia.

Genome Announc 2013 Oct 10;1(5). Epub 2013 Oct 10.

USDA Agricultural Research Service San Joaquín Valley Agricultural Sciences Center, Parlier, California, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/genomeA.00756-13DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3795209PMC
October 2013
7 Reads
4 Citations

Fifty-Hertz electromagnetic fields facilitate the induction of rat bone mesenchymal stromal cells to differentiate into functional neurons.

Cytotherapy 2013 Aug 17;15(8):961-70. Epub 2013 Apr 17.

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Guangdong Geriatric Institute, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcyt.2013.03.001DOI Listing
August 2013
18 Reads
13 Citations
3.293 Impact Factor

N-Glycosylation dictates proper processing of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1.

PLoS One 2012 20;7(12):e52563. Epub 2012 Dec 20.

College of Life Science, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China.

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0052563PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3527552PMC
June 2013
2 Reads
12 Citations
3.234 Impact Factor

Survey of endosymbionts in the Diaphorina citri metagenome and assembly of a Wolbachia wDi draft genome.

PLoS One 2012 16;7(11):e50067. Epub 2012 Nov 16.

Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States of America.

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0050067PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3500351PMC
April 2013
6 Reads
17 Citations
3.234 Impact Factor

Effects of low frequency electromagnetic field on proliferation of human epidermal stem cells: An in vitro study.

Bioelectromagnetics 2013 Jan 24;34(1):74-80. Epub 2012 Aug 24.

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Guangdong Geriatric Institute, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences and Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bem.21747DOI Listing
January 2013
19 Reads
7 Citations
1.705 Impact Factor

Identification of amino acids essential for estrone-3-sulfate transport within transmembrane domain 2 of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1.

PLoS One 2012 4;7(5):e36647. Epub 2012 May 4.

College of Life Science, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China.

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0036647PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3344916PMC
September 2012
6 Reads
9 Citations
3.234 Impact Factor

Prioritization of data quality dimensions and skills requirements in genome annotation work

Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology

The rapid accumulation of genome annotations, as well as their widespread reuse in clinical and scientific practice, poses new challenges to management of the quality of scientific data. This study contributes towards better understanding of scientists' perceptions of and priorities for data quality and data quality assurance skills needed in genome annotation. This study was guided by a previously developed general framework for assessment of data quality and by a taxonomy of data-quality (DQ) skills, and intended to define context-sensitive models of criteria for data quality and skills for genome annotation. Analysis of the results revealed that genomics scientists recognize specific sets of criteria for quality in the genome-annotation context. Seventeen data quality dimensions were reduced to 5-factor constructs, and 17 relevant skills were grouped into 4-factor constructs. The constructs defined by this study advance the understanding of data quality relationships and are an important contribution to data and information quality research. In addition, the resulting models can serve as valuable resources to genome data curators and administrators for developing data-curation policies and designing DQ-assurance strategies, processes, procedures, and infrastructure. The study's findings may also inform educators in developing data quality assurance curricula and training courses.

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August 2012
3 Reads

Effects of 50 Hz electromagnetic fields on human epidermal stem cells cultured on collagen sponge scaffolds.

Int J Radiat Biol 2012 Jul 31;88(7):523-30. Epub 2012 May 31.

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Guangdong General Hospital, Institute of Geriatrics, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/09553002.2012.692496DOI Listing
July 2012
8 Reads
1 Citation
1.840 Impact Factor

Citation characterization and impact normalization in bioinformatics journals.

Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology

Bioinformatics journals publish research findings of intellectual synergies among subfields such as biology, mathematics, and computer science. The objective of this study is to characterize the citation patterns in bioinformatics journals and their correspondent knowledge subfields. Our study analyzed bibliometric data (impact factor, cited-half-life, and references-per-article) of bioinformatics journals and their related subfields collected from the Journal Citation Reports (JCR). The findings showed that bioinformatics journals' citations are field-dependent, with scattered patterns in article life span and citing propensity. Bioinformatics journals originally derived from biology-related subfields have shorter article life spans, more citing on average, and higher impact factors. Those journals, derived from mathematics and statistics, demonstrate converse citation patterns. Journal impact factors were normalized, taking into account the impacts of article life spans and citing propensity. A comparison of these normalized factors to JCR journal impact factors showed rearrangements in the ranking orders of a number of individual journals, but a high overall correlation with JCR impact factors.

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July 2012
2 Reads

Health numeracy confidence among racial ethnic minorities in HINTS 2007: socio-demographic, attitudinal, and knowledge correlates

20 (2)

Literacy and Numeracy Studies

Health numeracy skills help people interpret health risks, and make effective medical decisions. Lower health numeracy confidence was observed for blacks and Hispanic groups than whites. Little is known about the important factors that explain racial differences in health numeracy confidence. For this study, we used a nationally representative, cross-sectional data sample of 4,610 U.S. adults from the National Cancer Institute’s 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey. Bivariate (Chi-squares) and multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify the contribution factors that predict health numeracy confidence. Non-linear Fairlie decompositions were used to quantify the factor contributions to racial differences in health numeracy confidence. The priority rankings of the important factors to explain the health numeracy confidence racial and ethnic disparities are different depending on the particular racial and ethnic group. Diverse, culturally appropriate approaches are needed to improve numeracy confidence for specific racial and ethnic groups.

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February 2012
7 Reads

A numerical study of summer ozone concentration over the Kanto area of Japan using the MM5/CMAQ model.

J Environ Sci (China) 2011 ;23(2):236-46

Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s1001-0742(10)60398-1DOI Listing
May 2011
5 Reads
2.002 Impact Factor

Top co-authors

Mei Hong
Mei Hong

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

3
Weifang Hong
Weifang Hong

College of Life Science

3
Ming-Sheng Zhang
Ming-Sheng Zhang

Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University

2
Surya Saha
Surya Saha

Boyce Thompson Institute

2
Kenzo Uchida
Kenzo Uchida

Fukui University Faculty of Medical Sciences

2
Kai Zhan
Kai Zhan

College of Life Science

2
Xinping Li
Xinping Li

College of Veterinary Medicine

2