Publications by authors named "Hoang Ngoc Thach"

5 Publications

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Biliary atresia combined Wilson disease identified by whole exome sequencing in Vietnamese patient with severe liver failure.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2022 Jan;101(2):e28547

Institute of Genome Research, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 - Hoang Quoc Viet Str., Caugiay, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Rationale: Hepatobiliary diseases such as biliary atresia (BA), Wilson disease, and progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis are common causes of morbidity and mortality in young children. Affected patients progress rapidly to end-stage cirrhosis and require liver transplantation or die. Mutations in many genes have been identified to play an important role in the pathogenesis of hepatobiliary diseases.

Patient Concerns And Diagnosis: In this study, we identified mutations in an 8-year-old girl who had severe liver failure. The patient was first diagnosed with BA at 2.5 months of age and has undergone Kasai surgery to connect the umbilical cord and jejunum. After that, the patient suddenly had unusual developments with symptoms of jaundice, acute liver failure with hemolysis. She was tested and diagnosed with Wilson disease.

Interventions And Outcomes: She was treated according to the regimen for a patient with Wilson disease but had abnormal progress leading to severe liver failure. Genetic analysis was performed by whole exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing methods. The genetic analysis revealed that the patient had a homozygous mutation (p.Gly17Glyfs77∗) in the KRT18 gene, a double heterozygous mutation (p.Ser105∗ and p.Pro992Leu) in the ATP7B gene, and a homozygous variant (p.Val444Ala) in the ABCB11 gene. In silico prediction of mutations indicated that these mutations are the cause of the severe liver failure in the patient.

Lesson: This is a rare clinical case of a BA patient combined with Wilson disease. Our results suggested that whole exome sequencing is an effective diagnostic tool and emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis and appropriate management to save lives and prevent serious complications in the patient.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000028547DOI Listing
January 2022

Pleuropulmonary blastoma: Difficulty in diagnosis and treatment of a case in Vietnam.

Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2021 Feb 27;38(1):80-88. Epub 2020 Sep 27.

Radiotherapy Department of Oncology Center, Hue Central Hospital, Hue, Vietnam.

Pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB) is a rare malignant tumor in childhood cancer. This type of tumor is difficult to identify and can easily be misdiagnosed. The International PPB protocol is a complicated and aggressive protocol. It is not easily applicable to developing countries where hospitals do not have enough resources. Here we present a challanging case of a patient successfully treated in Vietnam, using limited medical resources. The patient (22 month old, male) was diagnosed with congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation in his 1 hospital admission. After 6 months of onset, the patient was diagnosed with PPB type II in the fourth hospitalization following analysis of a lung CT scan and a pathology report. After the aggressive chemotherapy regimen, the patient had two episodes of severe neutropenia and infection from which he recovered. The patient received chemotherapy and surgery treatment at our hospital, but received radiation under general anesthesia and rehabilitation therapy to improve respiration at another hospital over 600 km away. It has been 1.5 years after entering remission, and he is starting kindergarten. Lung CT scan and pathology should be analyzed to avoid missing diagnosis of PPB in patients with cystic or mixed cystic and solid lung lesions. Biopsies from cases of suspected PPB should be sent for expert pathology review. Two factors important to the successful application of the protocol are good supportive care and the multidisciplinary collaboration between medical facilities to provide proper resources during treatment. We hope to recreate more successful outcomes not only in Vietnam but also in all developing countries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08880018.2020.1818905DOI Listing
February 2021

Adenovirus Type 7 Pneumonia in Children Who Died from Measles-Associated Pneumonia, Hanoi, Vietnam, 2014.

Emerg Infect Dis 2016 Apr;22(4):687-90

During a 2014 measles outbreak in Vietnam, postmortem pathologic examination of hospitalized children who died showed that adenovirus type 7 pneumonia was a contributory cause of death in children with measles-associated immune suppression. Adenovirus type 7 pneumonia should be recognized as a major cause of secondary infection after measles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2204.151595DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4806935PMC
April 2016

Pathological study of archival lung tissues from five fatal cases of avian H5N1 influenza in Vietnam.

Mod Pathol 2013 Mar 23;26(3):357-69. Epub 2012 Nov 23.

Department of Pathology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan.

Highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza virus (H5N1) infection in humans causes acute respiratory distress syndrome, leading to multiple organ failure. Five fatal cases of H5N1 infection in Vietnam were analyzed pathologically to reveal virus distribution, and local proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression profiles in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung tissues. Our main histopathological findings showed diffuse alveolar damage in the lungs. The infiltration of myeloperoxidase-positive and/or CD68 (clone KP-1)-positive neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages was remarkable in the alveolar septa and alveolar spaces. Immunohistochemistry revealed that H5N1 mainly infected alveolar epithelial cells and monocytes/macrophages in lungs. H5N1 replication was confirmed by detecting H5N1 mRNA in epithelial cells using in situ hybridization. Quantitation of H5N1 RNA using quantitative reverse transcription PCR assays revealed that the level of H5N1 RNA was increased in cases during early phases of the disease. We quantified the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (commonly known as RANTES), and interferon-gamma-inducible protein of 10 kDa (IP-10) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung sections. Their expression levels correlated with H5N1 RNA copy numbers detected in the same lung region. Double immunofluorescence staining revealed that TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8 and IP-10 were expressed in epithelial cells and/or monocytes/macrophages. In particular, IL-6 was also expressed in endothelial cells. The dissemination of H5N1 beyond respiratory organs was not confirmed in two cases examined in this study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/modpathol.2012.193DOI Listing
March 2013

H5N1-infected cells in lung with diffuse alveolar damage in exudative phase from a fatal case in Vietnam.

Jpn J Infect Dis 2008 Mar;61(2):157-60

The National Hospital of Pediatrics, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Necropsied lung tissues of three fatal cases with avian influenza A virus (H5N1) infection in Vietnam were analyzed to detect H5N1 virus-infected cells. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded lung tissue sections showed typical histological features of diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) in all cases. Immunohistochemistry for the influenza A virus nucleoprotein antigen revealed positive signals of bronchiolar and alveolar epithelial cells in only one patient, who exhibited DAD with an exudative phase and died on the 6th day after onset. However, no signal was detected in the other two cases of DAD with a proliferative phase. These patients died on day 16 and day 17 after onset, respectively. H5N1 virus antigens were detected predominantly in epithelial cells in terminal bronchioles and in alveoli, i.e., type I and type II alveolar pneumocytes, and in alveolar macrophages. The pathogenesis of exudative DAD caused by H5N1 infection is discussed.
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March 2008
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