Publications by authors named "Hoang Duong"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Efficient and Flexible Hierarchical Data Layouts for a Unified Encoding of Scalar Field Precision and Resolution.

IEEE Trans Vis Comput Graph 2021 Feb 28;27(2):603-613. Epub 2021 Jan 28.

To address the problem of ever-growing scientific data sizes making data movement a major hindrance to analysis, we introduce a novel encoding for scalar fields: a unified tree of resolution and precision, specifically constructed so that valid cuts correspond to sensible approximations of the original field in the precision-resolution space. Furthermore, we introduce a highly flexible encoding of such trees that forms a parameterized family of data hierarchies. We discuss how different parameter choices lead to different trade-offs in practice, and show how specific choices result in known data representation schemes such as zfp [52], idx [58], and jpeg2000 [76]. Finally, we provide system-level details and empirical evidence on how such hierarchies facilitate common approximate queries with minimal data movement and time, using real-world data sets ranging from a few gigabytes to nearly a terabyte in size. Experiments suggest that our new strategy of combining reductions in resolution and precision is competitive with state-of-the-art compression techniques with respect to data quality, while being significantly more flexible and orders of magnitude faster, and requiring significantly reduced resources.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TVCG.2020.3030381DOI Listing
February 2021

Sitagliptin Increases Beta-Cell Function and Decreases Insulin Resistance in Newly Diagnosed Vietnamese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes 2020 19;13:2119-2127. Epub 2020 Jun 19.

Division of Military Science, Military Hospital 103, Ha Noi, Vietnam.

Introduction: To investigate effects of Sitagliptin on the enhancement of beta-cell function, reducing insulin resistance, serum glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) concentrations and blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and suggest one of the underlying mechanisms on beta-cell function and insulin resistance.

Patients And Methods: This was a cross-sectional and observational study in comparison to the control group. A study population of 44 newly diagnosed patients with T2D treated with Sitagliptin with a dose of 100 mg/day for 3 months was analyzed to compare 52 healthy participants. Indices for beta-cell function, peripheral insulin sensitivity, and insulin resistance were calculated with homeostasis model assessment 2 (HOMA2) calculator and compared. Serum GLP-1 concentrations were analyzed, and regression analysis was conducted to find the correlations between GLP-1 and beta-cell function and insulin resistance.

Results: Newly diagnosed patients with T2D witnessed a significant reduction in beta-cell function, serum GLP-1 concentrations at the time of diagnosis. After treatment with Sitagliptin 100 mg/day, they achieved significant improvements in beta-cell function, peripheral insulin sensitivity and insulin resistance. Serum GLP-1 concentrations were increased significantly to those levels in the control group and correlated with peripheral insulin sensitivity and insulin resistance in patients whose beta-cell functions improved.

Conclusion: Sitagliptin improved beta-cell function, insulin resistance and blood glucose in newly diagnosed patients with T2D. Meanwhile, Sitagliptin ameliorated serum GLP-1 concentrations, which contributed to the enhancement of beta-cell.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/DMSO.S255071DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7310979PMC
June 2020

Normal Ranges of Left Ventricular Strain by Three-Dimensional Speckle-Tracking Echocardiography in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

J Am Soc Echocardiogr 2019 12 11;32(12):1586-1597.e5. Epub 2019 Oct 11.

Christ Hospital Health Network, Cincinnati, Ohio. Electronic address:

Background: Establishing normal values and associated variations of three-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography- (3DSTE-) derived left ventricular (LV) strain is necessary for accurate interpretation and comparison of measurements. We aimed to perform a meta-analysis of normal ranges of LV global longitudinal strain (GLS), global circumferential strain (GCS), global radial strain (GRS), and global area strain (GAS) measurements derived by 3DSTE and to identify confounding factors that may contribute to variance in reported measures.

Methods: The authors searched four databases, PubMed, Scopus, Embase, and Cochrane Library, through January 2019 using the key terms "left ventricular/left ventricle/left ventricles", "strain/deformation/speckle tracking", and "three dimensional/three-dimensional/three-dimension/three dimension/3D". Studies were included if the articles reported LV strain using 3DSTE in healthy normal subjects, either in the control group or comprising the entire study cohort. The weighted mean was estimated by using the random effects model with a 95% CI. Heterogeneity across studies was assessed using the I test. Effects of demographic (age), clinical, and vendor variables were assessed in a metaregression. The National Institutes of Health tools were used to assess the quality of included articles. Publication bias was examined by Begg's funnel plot and Egger's regression test.

Results: The search yielded 895 articles. After abstract and full-text screening we included 33 data sets with 2,346 patients for meta-analysis. The reported normal mean values of GLS among the studies varied from -15.80% to -23.40% (mean, -19.05%; 95% CI, -18.18% to -19.93%; I = 99.0%), GCS varied from -15.50% to -39.50% (mean, -22.42%; 95% CI, -20.96% to -23.89%, I = 99.7%), GRS varied from 19.81% to 86.61% (mean, 47.48%; 95% CI, 41.50%-53.46%; I = 99.8%), and GAS varied from -27.40% to -50.80% (mean, -35.03%; 95% CI, -33.19% to -36.87%; I = 99.3%). Software for strain analysis was consistently associated with variations in normal strain values (GLS: P = .016; GCS: P < .001; GRS: P < .001; GAS: P < .001).

Conclusions: Variations in the normal ranges across studies were significantly associated with the software used for strain analysis, emphasizing that this factor must be considered in the interpretation of strain data.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.echo.2019.07.012DOI Listing
December 2019

Re-expansion of Osteoporotic Compression Fractures Using Bilateral SpineJack Implants: Early Clinical Experience and Biomechanical Considerations.

Cureus 2019 Apr 30;11(4):e4572. Epub 2019 Apr 30.

Interventional Neuroradiology, Memorial Healthcare System, Hollywood, USA.

Thoraco-lumbar osteoporotic compression fractures have a higher incidence of continued collapse with development of deformity and progression to vertebra plana when untreated and even after vertebral augmentation (VA) or balloon kyphoplasty (BKP). Even when there is the restoration of height and improvement in angulation, multiple long-term follow-up series have repeatedly documented that over time, many patients lose the initial height correction and in a smaller group the vertebral body re-collapses leading to the development of progressive deformity with an increased risk for adjacent level fractures. At first, larger balloons and more cement were used to try and avoid these problems, but it did not reduce the risk of adjacent fractures. Several procedures were developed to place various types of intervertebral implants combined with bone cement to maintain the initial height correction. Initial studies with these implants showed a reduction in adjacent level fractures but the systems did not proceed to market. The SpineJack(SJ) system (Stryker Corp, Kalamazoo, MI), consisting of bilateral expandable titanium implants supplemented with bone cement, was first used approximately 10 years ago in Europe and recently gained FDA approval in the United States. This system provides more symmetric and balanced lateral and anterior support and is effective with lesser amounts of bone cement compared to BKP. Follow-up studies have documented that there is equal or better pain control, with better long-term results based both on maintaining vertebral height restoration and deformity correction. Most importantly, statistically it clearly reduces the risk of adjacent level fractures by at least 60%. The biomechanical effects of intravertebral implants for osteoporotic fractures in regard to the risk of adjacent level fractures and preliminary experience with the use of the SJis reviewed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.4572DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6605968PMC
April 2019

A Study of the Trade-off Between Reducing Precision and Reducing Resolution for Data Analysis and Visualization.

IEEE Trans Vis Comput Graph 2018 Aug 20. Epub 2018 Aug 20.

There currently exist two dominant strategies to reduce data sizes in analysis and visualization: reducing the precision of the data, e.g., through quantization, or reducing its resolution, e.g., by subsampling. Both have advantages and disadvantages and both face fundamental limits at which the reduced information ceases to be useful. The paper explores the additional gains that could be achieved by combining both strategies. In particular, we present a common framework that allows us to study the trade-off in reducing precision and/or resolution in a principled manner. We represent data reduction schemes as progressive streams of bits and study how various bit orderings such as by resolution, by precision, etc., impact the resulting approximation error across a variety of data sets as well as analysis tasks. Furthermore, we compute streams that are optimized for different tasks to serve as lower bounds on the achievable error. Scientific data management systems can use the results presented in this paper as guidance on how to store and stream data to make efficient use of the limited storage and bandwidth in practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TVCG.2018.2864853DOI Listing
August 2018

Microbiological profile and risk factors for in-hospital mortality of infective endocarditis in tertiary care hospitals of south Vietnam.

PLoS One 2017 14;12(12):e0189421. Epub 2017 Dec 14.

Pham Ngoc Thach university of medicine, Ho Chi Minh city, Viet Nam.

Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the microbiological characteristics and risk factors for mortality of infective endocarditis in two tertiary hospitals in Ho Chi Minh City, south Vietnam.

Materials And Methods: A retrospective study of 189 patients (120 men, 69 women; mean age 38 ± 18 years) with the diagnosis of probable or definite infective endocarditis (IE) according to the modified Duke Criteria admitted to The Heart Institute or Tam Duc Hospital between January 2005 and December 2014.

Results: IE was related to a native valve in 165 patients (87.3%), and prosthetic valve in 24 (12.7%). Of the 189 patients in our series, the culture positive rate was 70.4%. The most common isolated pathogens were Streptococci (75.2%), Staphylococci (9.8%) followed by gram negative organism (4.5%). The sensitivity rate of Streptococci to ampicillin, ceftriaxone or vancomycin was 100%. The rate of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus was 40%. There was a decrease in penicillin sensitivity for Streptococci over three eras: 2005-2007 (100%), 2008-2010 (94%) and 2010-2014 (84%). The in-hospital mortality rate was 6.9%. Logistic regression analysis found prosthetic valve and NYHA grade 3 or 4 heart failure and vegetation size of more than 15 mm as strong predictors of in-hospital mortality.

Conclusion: Streptococcal species were the major pathogen of IE in the recent years with low rates of antimicrobial resistance. Prosthetic valve involvement, moderate or severe heart failure and vegetation size of more than 15 mm were independent predictors for in-hospital mortality in IE.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0189421PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5730146PMC
January 2018

Relationship between weather conditions and admissions for ischemic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Croat Med J 2017 Feb;58(1):56-62

Adam Domonkos Tarnoki, Department of Radiology and Oncotherapy, Semmelweis University, 78/A Ulloi street, Budapest 1082, Hungary,

Aim: To assess impacts of different weather conditions on hospitalizations of patients with ischemic strokes and subarachnoid hemorrhages (SAH) in South Florida.

Methods: Diagnostic data of patients with spontaneous SAH and strokes were recorded between June 2010 and July 2013. Daily synchronous forecast charts were collected from the National Weather Service and the whole data were matched prospectively. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) was calculated.

Results: Increased incidence rate of ischemic stroke was consistent with the daily lowest and highest air pressure (IRR 1.03, P=0.128 and IRR 0.98, P=0.380, respectively), highest air temperature (IRR 0.99, P=0.375), and presence of hurricanes or storms (IRR 0.65, P=0.054). Increased incidence of SAH cases was consistent with daily lowest and highest air pressure (IRR 0.87, P<0.001 and IRR 1.08, P=0.019, respectively) and highest air temperature (IRR 0.98, P<0.001). Presence of hurricanes and/or tropical storms did not influence the frequency of SAH. We found no relationship between the presence of fronts and the admissions for ischemic stroke or SAH.

Conclusion: Higher number of ischemic stroke and SAH cases can be expected with the daily lowest and highest air pressure, highest air temperature. Presence of hurricanes or tropical storms increased the risk of ischemic stroke but not the SAH. These findings can help to develop preventive health plans for cerebrovascular diseases.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5346902PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3325/cmj.2017.58.56DOI Listing
February 2017

The baseline characteristics and interim analyses of the high-risk sentinel cohort of the Vietnam Initiative on Zoonotic InfectiONS (VIZIONS).

Sci Rep 2015 Dec 10;5:17965. Epub 2015 Dec 10.

Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programme, Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

The Vietnam Initiative for Zoonotic Infections (VIZIONS) includes community-based 'high-risk sentinel cohort' (HRSC) studies investigating individuals at risk of zoonotic infection due to occupational or residential exposure to animals. A total of 852 HRSC members were recruited between March 2013 and August 2014 from three provinces (Ha Noi, Dak Lak, and Dong Thap). The most numerous group (72.8%) corresponded to individuals living on farms, followed by slaughterers (16.3%) and animal health workers (8.5%). Nasal/pharyngeal and rectal swabs were collected from HRSC members at recruitment and after notifying illness. Exposure to exotic animals (including wild pigs, porcupine, monkey, civet, bamboo rat and bat) was highest for the Dak Lak cohort (53.7%), followed by Ha Noi (13.7%) and Dong Thap (4.0%). A total of 26.8% of individuals reported consumption of raw blood over the previous year; 33.6% slaughterers reported no use of protective equipment at work. Over 686 person-years of observation, 213 episodes of suspect infectious disease were notified, equivalent of 0.35 reports per person-year. Responsive samples were collected from animals in the farm cohort. There was noticeable time and space clustering of disease episodes suggesting that the VIZIONS set up is also suitable for the formal epidemiological investigation of disease outbreaks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep17965DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4674710PMC
December 2015

Synergistic co-delivery of doxorubicin and paclitaxel using multi-functional micelles for cancer treatment.

Int J Pharm 2013 Sep 21;454(1):486-95. Epub 2013 Jun 21.

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 4, Singapore 117576, Singapore.

The main purposes of this study are to demonstrate the synergistic anticancer drug systems with the combined doxorubicin (D) and paclitaxel (P) via the aid of cell penetrating and cell targeting moieties for enhancing the cancer therapeutic effect. Firstly, the synergistic effect of combined free drugs (D/P) was investigated to obtain the suitable dose combination for subsequent studies. The combination of free drugs D/P at molar ratio of 1/0.2 shows synergistic therapeutic effect compared with the treatment of a free single drug D or P. Secondly, sustainable release systems of two single drug-loaded micelles, (i) co-delivered D-FOL micelle & P-FOL micelle system and (ii) co-delivered D-TAT/FOL micelle & P-TAT/FOL micelle system, at D/P molar ratio of 1/0.2 were investigated. The results show synergistic effect with the higher efficacy of the TAT/FOL system compared to FOL only system. Finally, a dual D/P-loaded system with sustainable release rate, synergistic drug interaction, selective targeting to cancer cells and high cell penetrating ability was designed. The D/P-TAT/FOL micelles exhibit an IC50 value of 0.172 μM D/0.043 μM P, which is much lower than the IC50 values of the single drug-loaded micelles without functionalization (3.873 μM for D-micelles and 0.790 μM for P-micelles). Overall, this newly developed dual encapsulation of D and P in the multifunctional carrier would be a promising technology for cancer treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpharm.2013.06.017DOI Listing
September 2013

Folate-Conjugated Polymer Micelles with pH-Triggered Drug Release Properties.

Macromol Rapid Commun 2010 Jul 11;31(13):1163-9. Epub 2010 May 11.

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 119260, Singapore.

Folate has been applied as a targeting moiety for various anticancer drug-delivery agents to avoid non-specific attack of normal tissues as well as to increase cellular uptake at the target tumor cells. Polymer micelles made of poly[(D,L-lactide)-co-glycolide)]-poly(ethylene glycol)-folate (PLGA-PEG-FOL) was fabricated as a tumor targeting carrier for encapsulating the anticancer drug doxorubicin. To accelerate the drug release in the endosome after folate-mediated cellular uptake, pH-sensitive poly(β-amino ester)-PEG-FOL (PAE-PEG-FOL) was added together with PLGA-PEG-FOL to form mixed micelles. The results showed that the drug release can be triggered at different pH due to the ionization of PAE. The IC(50) of PLGA-PEG-FOL micelles is 0.46 × 10(-6) M. With 20% PAE in the mixed micelles (20:80 mixed micelles), the IC(50) decreases to 0.34 × 10(-6) M, which is comparable to that of pure PAE-PEG-FOL micelles at pH 7.4. As a result of the pH sensitivity, the PAE-PEG-FOL micelles are not stable at pH 6.5 or lower, and the drug may be released from the micelles into the extracellular environment before uptake by the cells. The 20:80 mixed micelles are relatively stable at this condition. As a result, the micelles retain more drug in the micelles for a higher degree of cellular uptake by folate receptor-mediated endocytosis, and exhibit higher cytotoxicity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/marc.200900876DOI Listing
July 2010

Feasibility of using hyperosmolar mannitol as a liquid tumor embolization agent.

AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 2005 Jun-Jul;26(6):1405-12

Department of Radiology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.

Background And Purpose: This study assesses the cytotoxicity of hyperosmolar mannitol on human endothelial and meningioma cells in vitro and summarizes the initial clinical experience of using mannitol as a liquid tumor embolization agent.

Methods: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells and primary meningioma cells from surgical specimens were treated with 300, 600, 900, and 1200 mOsm of mannitol, mannitol and iohexol mixture, saline, and iohexol alone. Cell death was evaluated with a Live/Dead kit and quantified with thymidine incorporation. From 1998 to 2004, 23 patients with meningioma were treated with mannitol and 31 patients were treated with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles alone. Angiographic results, procedural complications, intraoperative observation, and estimated blood loss during surgical resection were retrospectively evaluated.

Results: Minimal endothelial cell death was seen after incubation with 300 mOsm of mannitol for 15 minutes, but 43 +/- 2% of endothelial cells were damaged by 1200 mOsm of mannitol after 30 minutes. Five meningioma cell lines exhibited significant cell death (22 +/- 2%; P < .05) after incubation with mannitol. Satisfactory angiographic results were obtained in all 23 patients. Tumor necrosis was observed intraoperatively and confirmed pathologically. There was no significant difference in estimated blood loss between mannitol- and PVA-embolized patients (407 +/- 64 mL vs 381 +/- 50 mL; P > .75).

Conclusion: High concentration of mannitol can injure endothelial cells and meningioma cells in a short period of time. It is feasible to use mannitol as a liquid embolic agent to treat meningioma.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8149093PMC
December 2005

Dural arteriovenous fistula presents like an ischemic stroke.

Cogn Behav Neurol 2004 Mar;17(1):50-3

Department of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA.

Objective: We report the case of a patient with a dural arteriovenous fistula whose neurobehavioral syndrome was indistinguishable from that of an ischemic stroke.

Background: Case studies of dural arteriovenous fistulas primarily describe global cognitive changes like dementia, but detailed neurocognitive evaluations of dural arteriovenous fistula patients are rarely reported.

Method: We provide a dural arteriovenous fistula case of a patient who presented with aphasia and other symptoms of stroke. Background history, serial neuropsychological data, and angiographic images are presented.

Results And Conclusions: Serial neurocognitive data show the extent to which cognitive deficits are reversed with embolization. The case demonstrates that the mechanisms underlying neurocognitive deficits are specific to the fistula's unique hemodynamic features in addition to the location of the dural arteriovenous fistula.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00146965-200403000-00006DOI Listing
March 2004

Intraarterially administered verapamil as adjunct therapy for cerebral vasospasm: safety and 2-year experience.

AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 2002 Sep;23(8):1284-90

Department of Radiology, College of Physicians & Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.

Background And Purpose: Despite the widespread use of angioplasty, adjunct chemical therapy is often needed to treat patients with cerebral vasospasm. In this study, we examined the safety of intraarterial administration of verapamil to patients with cerebral vasospasm. We herein summarize our 2-year experience with this treatment.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the procedure reports, anesthesia records, clinical charts, and brain images of 29 patients who received intraarterially administered verapamil in 34 procedures for the treatment of vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage from July 1998 to June 2000. The average changes in mean arterial pressure and heart rate were used to measure cardiovascular side effects. The neurologic effects were assessed by angiographic findings, the results of neurologic examinations performed before and after the procedure, and findings of CT of the head.

Results: The average dose of verapamil per patient was 3 +/- 0 mg or 44 +/- 5 mcg/kg. The average changes in mean arterial pressure at 10 and 20 minutes were -5 +/- 1 mm Hg and -2 +/- 1 mm Hg or -3.8 +/- 1.0% and -1.7 +/- 1.1%, respectively. No significant change of heart rate was observed at 10 minutes. The patients showed no sign of increased intracranial pressure by hemodynamic parameters, neurologic examination, or CT of the head. On 10 occasions, when the effect of verapamil infusion was assessed angiographically, there was 44 +/- 9% increase of vessel diameter in the spastic segment. Neurologic improvement was noted after five of 17 procedures when verapamil was used as the sole treatment.

Conclusion: Low dose verapamil is safe when administered intraarterially to patients with cerebral vasospasm. Beneficial effects are achieved in some patients, prompting further study of its efficacy.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7976238PMC
September 2002

Clinical utility of quantitative cerebral blood flow measurements during internal carotid artery test occlusions.

Neurosurgery 2002 May;50(5):996-1004; discussion 1004-5

Department of Neurology, Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York 10032, USA.

Objective: Internal carotid artery (ICA) balloon test occlusions (BTOs) are performed in the angiography suite to predict whether the patient has adequate collateral circulation to prevent stroke when permanent ICA occlusion (PCO) is required for treatment. Although many criteria have been proposed to facilitate predictions of stroke risk after PCO, no BTO techniques have been subjected to predictive validity testing in outcome studies. We describe a prospective case series study that tests the predictive validity of quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements during ICA BTO.

Methods: Thirty-three patients with clinical indications for PCO underwent ICA BTO and then PCO. During BTO, standard neurological examinations, sustained-attention testing, and quantitative CBF measurements were performed. Two scalp scintillation detectors recorded washout data after ipsilateral intracarotid injection of xenon-133 through a port at the tip of the ICA-occluding balloon. Patients were monitored for the outcome measure of ipsilateral stroke for a mean of 34 months. The variables of quantitative CBF values, neurological examination results, sustained-attention test results, age, sex, and side of occlusion were examined with Kaplan-Meier log-rank tests, predictive validity analyses, and logistic regression analyses.

Results: CBF of less than 30 ml/100 g/min during BTO was the only variable that predicted stroke after PCO (log rank = 5.87, P = 0.015). The negative and positive predictive values for CBF findings were superior to those for standard neurological examination findings and sustained-attention test results. Age, sex, and side of occlusion did not predict stroke.

Conclusion: Quantitative CBF testing, via the intracarotid injection technique, during BTO seems to be an important predictor of stroke after PCO.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00006123-200205000-00012DOI Listing
May 2002
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