Publications by authors named "Hitomi Matsuda"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Factors Associated with Volunteer Activities and Sleep Efficiency in Older Adults with Hypertension: A Sequential Model Study.

Geriatrics (Basel) 2021 Sep 11;6(3). Epub 2021 Sep 11.

Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Department of Human Care Science, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8575, Ibaraki, Japan.

The purpose of this study was to examine, using a sequential model, factors associated with volunteer participation and sleep efficiency in Japanese older adults receiving treatment for hypertensive disease. A questionnaire survey was conducted to collect data on participant demographics, lifestyle, health status, and depression, and sleep activity monitors were used to objectively measure sleep status and sleep efficacy. Of the 167 respondents, the 59 being treated for hypertension were divided into two groups based on their participation in volunteering. Comparison between the groups showed significant differences in nocturnal awakening, sleep efficiency, and nap frequency. Volunteers had less nocturnal awakening, increased sleep efficiency, fewer naps, and decreased depression. Covariance structure analysis of the survey data and sleep measurements for hypertensive older adults in the volunteer group was performed by modeling the relationships between variables with a path diagram. Our model showed strong goodness of fit (χ test = 15.636, = 0.111, GFI = 0.925, AGFI = 0.842, CFI = 0.925, RMSEA = 0.099). The findings of this study suggest that older adults with hypertension who participate in volunteer activities have less nocturnal awakening, improved sleep quality, and reduced risk of depression, and provides evidence to promote social participation in volunteering among older adults with hypertension.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics6030089DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8482086PMC
September 2021

Approach for differentiating trophoblast cell lineage from human induced pluripotent stem cells with retinoic acid in the absence of bone morphogenetic protein 4.

Placenta 2018 11 10;71:24-30. Epub 2018 Oct 10.

Laboratory of Clinical Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Osaka Ohtani University, Osaka, Japan.

Introduction: Placental transport is the first step in chemotherapeutic safety evaluations during pregnancy. However, a well-established in vitro model is not available. We previously reported that a trophoblast layer model using differentiating choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cells (DJEGs) can be used for placental drug transport studies. However, it was necessary to increase the similarities between the syncytiotrophoblast, the main layer of the placental barrier, and the in vitro evaluation model in order for the model to be useful for placental drug transport evaluations. We focused on in vivo similarities of differentiating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). iPSCs can achieve a syncytiotrophoblast-like form and secrete human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) following bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) treatment. However, BMP4-treated iPSCs can differentiate into several cell types. In the placental transport model, a dense syncytiotrophoblast cell layer is necessary for appropriate differentiation.

Methods: The conditions permitting differentiation of iPSCs into syncytiotrophoblasts with retinoic acid (RA) treatment without BMP4 were investigated. The presence of syncytiotrophoblast-like cells was confirmed by measurement of mRNA expression levels of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and paternally expressed 10 (PEG10) in syncytiotrophoblasts. In addition, immunofluorescence imaging of cytokeratin 7 (CK7) induced in trophoblasts was performed.

Results: and Discussion: RA-induced iPSCs exhibited these syncytiotrophoblast-like features and hCG secretion was maintained for at least 28 days after treatment with RA (500 nM) without BMP4. These results suggest that RA-induced iPSCs are a suitable in vitro syncytiotrophoblast model that can be used as an indicator of drug placental transport for pharmacotherapy during pregnancy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.placenta.2018.10.001DOI Listing
November 2018

The relationship between hypertension and nocturnal waking in community-dwelling elderly individuals.

Nihon Ronen Igakkai Zasshi 2017 ;54(1):56-62

Graduate School of Comprehensive Medical Sciences, University of Tsukuba.

Aim: This study aimed to clarify the relationship between hypertension and nocturnal waking among community-dwelling elderly individuals.

Subjects And Methods: The survey was performed by asking questions related to the basic attributes, lifestyle, sleep conditions and the health status of 422 elderly individuals who belonged to elderly clubs. The subjects were divided into a hypertension group and a non-hypertension group. The data were analyzed using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and a logistic regression analysis.

Results: Two hundred of the 422 elderly individuals responded to the questions (response rate: 47.4%). The rate of obesity in the hypertension group was significantly higher (p=.01) than that in the non-hypertension group. The logistic regression analysis revealed that hypertension was associated with the BMI (OR=1.148, 95%CI: 1.022-1.289) and the number of nocturnal waking episodes (OR=1.449, 95%CI: 1.015-2.067). In the hypertension group, the number of nocturnal waking episodes was significantly correlated with age (rs=0.232), and the performance of volunteer activities was associated with a decreased number of nocturnal waking episodes (rs=-0.356).

Conclusions: It was shown that nocturnal waking and obesity were strongly associated with hypertension. The performance of volunteer activities was also correlated a decrease in the number of nocturnal waking episodes. Further studies should be performed to investigate the relationship between hypertension, the number of nocturnal waking episodes and sympathetic nerve activity. A greater number of physiological activities should be evaluated and the volunteer activities in which the elderly people participated should be precisely analyzed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3143/geriatrics.54.56DOI Listing
May 2017

Rapid and simple determination of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids in rabbit renal artery by reversed-phase HPLC with fluorescence detection.

Vascul Pharmacol 2005 Mar;42(4):163-9

Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392, Japan.

A liquid chromatographic method with fluorescence detection coupled with a solid-phase extraction was applied to the rapid determination of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) in the rabbit renal artery. The EETs were extracted with an acetonitrile from renal artery homogenate and concentrated by a solid-phase extraction method. The concentrated EETs were reacted directly with a 6, 7-dimethoxy-1-methyl-2 (1H)-quinoxalinone-3-propionyl-carboxylic acid (DMEQ) hydrazide and separated by a reversed-phase HPLC with eluting a combination of a step-wise and a gradient of a mixture of methanol and water. The content of EETs in the renal arteries was significantly greater in the 0.5% cholesterol fed rabbits than in control rabbits. It is suggested that hyperchlesterolemia increases the production of EETs in the rabbit renal artery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vph.2004.12.003DOI Listing
March 2005

Hypothyroidism changes adrenoceptor- and muscarinic receptor-mediated blood pressure responses.

Eur J Pharmacol 2005 Jan 23;507(1-3):311-6. Epub 2004 Nov 23.

Second Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Showa University, Hatanodai 1-5-8, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 142-8555, Japan.

Hypothyroidism was induced by the administration of 0.03% methimazole to drinking water for 1, 2 or 6 weeks to study whether there is a change in adrenoceptor- and muscarinic receptor-mediated blood pressure responses in hypothyroid rats. After 1, 2 and 6 weeks of treatment, the pressor response to norepinephrine was progressively suppressed, and after 6 weeks a significant suppression was observed as compared to control. The depressor response induced by isoprenaline, acetylcholine or sodium nitroprusside was not significantly different between control and hypothyroid rats at any time. The pressor response induced by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG), an inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthase, was significantly reduced in hypothyroid rats after 1, 2 or 6 weeks of treatment, and the magnitude of the reduction was almost the same for three groups. These results indicated that hypothyroidism causes a time-dependent decrease in pressor responses mediated by alpha-adrenoceptors, but a time-independent decrease in those induced by L-NOARG, and suggest that a progressive decrease in alpha-adrenoceptor-mediated pressor responses occurs in hypothyroidism; however, the decrease in basal NO production and/or release in the peripheral vasculature already occurs in hypothyroid rats at an early stage of the disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejphar.2004.11.002DOI Listing
January 2005
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