Publications by authors named "Hitomi Ando"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Comparison of the labor curves with and without combined spinal-epidural analgesia in nulliparous women- a retrospective study.

BMC Pregnancy Childbirth 2020 Aug 15;20(1):467. Epub 2020 Aug 15.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8421, Japan.

Background: Neuraxial labor analgesia is known to increase the rate of instrumental delivery and prolong the second stage of labor; however, there is no standard method to evaluate the progress of labor under analgesia. Friedman curve is considered the gold standard for evaluating the progress of labor. However, it included not only neuraxial labor analgesia but also labor without analgesia. Thus we compared the labor curves of primiparous women undergoing labor with and without neuraxial labor analgesia, to understand the progress of labor in both groups and to arrive at a standard curve to monitor the progress of labor under neuraxial analgesia.

Methods: Primiparous women with cephalic singleton pregnancies who delivered at term from 2016 to 2017 were included. Two hundred patients who opted for combined spinal-epidural (CSE) labor analgesia were included in the CSE group and 200 patients who did not undergo CSE were included in the non-CSE group. In all, 400 cases were examined retrospectively. The evaluation parameters were cervical dilation and fetal station, and we calculated the average value per hour to plot the labor curves.

Results: The labor curve of the non-CSE group was significantly different from the Friedman curve. In the CSE group, the time from 4 cm dilation of the cervix to full dilation was 15 h; in addition, the speed of cervical dilation was different from that in the non-CSE group. The progress of labor in the CSE group was faster than that in the non-CSE group during the latent phase; however, the progress in the CSE group was slower than that in the non-CSE group during the active phase.

Conclusions: Neuraxial labor analgesia results in early cervical dilation and descent of the fetal head; thus, appropriate advance planning to manage the delivery may be essential.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12884-020-03161-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7429797PMC
August 2020

Long-term efficacy and safety of aromatase inhibitor use for leiomyomatosis peritonealis disseminata.

J Obstet Gynaecol Res 2017 Sep 10;43(9):1489-1492. Epub 2017 Jul 10.

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Juntendo Nerima Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan.

Leiomyomatosis peritonealis disseminata is a rare disease characterized by pelvic smooth-muscle nodules of various sizes. It is sometimes misdiagnosed as ovarian or peritoneal carcinoma metastasis; therefore, surgical excision for pathological diagnosis is required. Treatment options include bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO), gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist therapy, and aromatase inhibitor therapy. All of these suppress estrogen levels, but a standard treatment has not been established. A 40-year-old woman had multiple pelvic tumors, suspicious for ovarian cancer. She underwent laparotomy, where frozen sections of the nodules revealed leiomyomatosis peritonealis disseminata. After she completed gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist therapy, we performed a total abdominal hysterectomy and BSO with residual-nodule resection, but the nodules recurred 6 months after surgery. We then started letrozole, and 3 years have now elapsed without nodule enlargement or development of new lesions. The long-term use of aromatase inhibitor therapy is thought to be effective and safe for patients with recurrence after BSO.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jog.13376DOI Listing
September 2017

3-Methylthiopropionic acid ethyl ester, isolated from Katsura-uri (Japanese pickling melon, Cucumis melo var. conomon), enhanced differentiation in human colon cancer cells.

J Agric Food Chem 2008 May 22;56(9):2977-84. Epub 2008 Apr 22.

Department of Food Sciences and Nutritional Health, Kyoto Prefectural University, Shimogamo-Hangi, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8522, Japan.

The fully ripened fruit of Katsura-uri Japanese pickling melon ( Cucumis melo var. conomon) has rarely been used for food because the midripened fruit is utilized for making pickles, but the fully ripened fruit is no longer valuable for pickles due to the fruit body being too soft. We have considered the utilization of the fully ripened Katsura-uri fruit that may be used for nonpickling products, particularly if the fully ripened fruit demonstrated health benefits such as anticarcinogenic properties. The phytochemical extract from the fully ripened fruit of Katsura-uri Japanese pickling melon was purified via a bioassay-guided fractionation scheme, which was based on the induction of differentiation in a RCM-1 human colon cancer cell line. On the criteria of two differentiation markers (duct formation and alkaline phosphatase activity), the most potent fraction contained a compound identified as 3-methylthiopropionic acid ethyl ester, based on GC retention time, EI-MS, (1)H NMR, and (13)C NMR spectra. Previously, the role of 3-methylthiopropionic acid ethyl ester was considered as an odor producing compound in many fruits, but this study indicates potential medical benefits of this compound.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf072898iDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2435010PMC
May 2008

Isolation and characterization of a novel thraustochytrid-like microorganism that efficiently produces docosahexaenoic acid.

Biotechnol Lett 2006 Feb;28(3):197-202

Laboratory of Environmental Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Kita-ku, 060-0810, Japan.

A thraustochytrid-like microorganism (strain 12B) was isolated from the mangrove area of Okinawa, Japan. On the basis of its ectoplasmic net structure and biflagellate zoospores we determined strain 12B to be a novel member of the phylum Labyrinthulomycota in the kingdom Protoctista. When grown on glucose/seawater at 28 degrees C, it had a lipid content of 58% with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6 n-3) at 43% of the total fatty acids. It had a growth rate of 0.38 h(-1). The DHA production rate of 2.8 +/- 0.7 g l(-1) day(-1) is the highest value reported for any microorganism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10529-005-5335-4DOI Listing
February 2006

Biochemical properties and immunohistochemical localization of carbonic anhydrase in the sacculus of the inner ear in the salmon Oncorhynchus masou.

Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 2004 Jan;137(1):87-94

Laboratory of Comparative Physiology, Graduate School of Fisheries Sciences, Hokkaido University, 3-1-1 Minato, Hakodate 041-8611, Japan.

Carbonic anhydrase (CA) in the inner ear sacculus was examined by activity assay, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry to determine its role in otolith calcification. An immunoreactive protein with a molecular mass of approximately 28 kDa was detected by Western blotting. The CO2 hydration activity in the cytosol fraction of the sacculus was 5.4 units/mg protein, while little or no activity was detected in the nuclear and mitochondrial fractions. The enzyme activity was highly inhibited by acetazolamide. The concentration of 50% inhibition was 8.16 nM and the inhibition constant of the activity was 8.25 nM. Transitional and squamous epithelial cells of the sacculus were immunopositive with an anti-CA II antibody, but sensory epithelial cells and mitochondria-rich cells in the transitional epithelium were not. These results suggest that transitional epithelial cells other than mitochondria-rich cells and squamous epithelial cells play an important role in otolith calcification by supplying bicarbonate to otoliths and/or by eliminating protons from endolymph.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s1095-6433(03)00272-1DOI Listing
January 2004