Publications by authors named "Hisham Atan Edinur"

30 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Microbial Fabrication of Nanomaterial and Its Role in Disintegration of Exopolymeric Matrices of Biofilm.

Front Chem 2021 24;9:690590. Epub 2021 May 24.

Department of Biotechnology, Maulana Abul Kalam Azad University of Technology, Haringhata, India.

Bacterial biofilms are responsible for the development of various chronic wound-related and implant-mediated infections and confer protection to the pathogenic bacteria against antimicrobial drugs and host immune responses. Hence, biofilm-mediated chronic infections have created a tremendous burden upon healthcare systems worldwide. The development of biofilms upon the surface of medical implants has resulted in the failure of various implant-based surgeries and therapies. Although different conventional chemical and physical agents are used as antimicrobials, they fail to kill the sessile forms of bacterial pathogens due to the resistance exerted by the exopolysaccharide (EPS) matrices of the biofilm. One of the major techniques used in addressing such a problem is to directly check the biofilm formation by the use of novel antibiofilm materials, local drug delivery, and device-associated surface modifications, but the success of these techniques is still limited. The immense expansion in the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology has resulted in the development of novel nanomaterials as biocidal agents that can be either easily integrated within biomaterials to prevent the colonization of microbial cells or directly approach the pathogen overcoming the biofilm matrix. The antibiofilm efficacies of these nanomaterials are accomplished by the generation of oxidative stresses and through alterations of the genetic expressions. Microorganism-assisted synthesis of nanomaterials paved the path to success in such therapeutic approaches and is found to be more acceptable for its "greener" approach. Metallic nanoparticles functionalized with microbial enzymes, silver-platinum nanohybrids (AgPtNHs), bacterial nanowires, superparamagnetic iron oxide (FeO), and nanoparticles synthesized by both magnetotactic and non-magnetotactic bacteria showed are some of the examples of such agents used to attack the EPS.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fchem.2021.690590DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8181132PMC
May 2021

Amylases: Biofilm Inducer or Biofilm Inhibitor?

Front Cell Infect Microbiol 2021 27;11:660048. Epub 2021 Apr 27.

Department of Biotechnology, Maulana Abul Kalam Azad University of Technology, Haringhata, India.

Biofilm is a syntrophic association of sessile groups of microbial cells that adhere to biotic and abiotic surfaces with the help of pili and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). EPSs also prevent penetration of antimicrobials/antibiotics into the sessile groups of cells. Hence, methods and agents to avoid or remove biofilms are urgently needed. Enzymes play important roles in the removal of biofilm in natural environments and may be promising agents for this purpose. As the major component of the EPS is polysaccharide, amylase has inhibited EPS by preventing the adherence of the microbial cells, thus making amylase a suitable antimicrobial agent. On the other hand, salivary amylase binds to amylase-binding protein of plaque-forming and initiates the formation of biofilm. This review investigates the contradictory actions and microbe-associated genes of amylases, with emphasis on their structural and functional characteristics.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2021.660048DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8112260PMC
April 2021

Bacterial Biopolymer: Its Role in Pathogenesis to Effective Biomaterials.

Polymers (Basel) 2021 Apr 12;13(8). Epub 2021 Apr 12.

Department of Biotechnology, Maulana Abul Kalam Azad University of Technology, Haringhata 741249, India.

Bacteria are considered as the major cell factories, which can effectively convert nitrogen and carbon sources to a wide variety of extracellular and intracellular biopolymers like polyamides, polysaccharides, polyphosphates, polyesters, proteinaceous compounds, and extracellular DNA. Bacterial biopolymers find applications in pathogenicity, and their diverse materialistic and chemical properties make them suitable to be used in medicinal industries. When these biopolymer compounds are obtained from pathogenic bacteria, they serve as important virulence factors, but when they are produced by non-pathogenic bacteria, they act as food components or biomaterials. There have been interdisciplinary studies going on to focus on the molecular mechanism of synthesis of bacterial biopolymers and identification of new targets for antimicrobial drugs, utilizing synthetic biology for designing and production of innovative biomaterials. This review sheds light on the mechanism of synthesis of bacterial biopolymers and its necessary modifications to be used as cell based micro-factories for the production of tailor-made biomaterials for high-end applications and their role in pathogenesis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/polym13081242DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8069653PMC
April 2021

Synthesis and Characterization of Diosgenin Encapsulated Poly-ε-Caprolactone-Pluronic Nanoparticles and Its Effect on Brain Cancer Cells.

Polymers (Basel) 2021 Apr 18;13(8). Epub 2021 Apr 18.

Centre of Excellence, Khallikote University, Berhampur, Ganjam, Odisha 761008, India.

Diosgenin encapsulated PCL-Pluronic nanoparticles (PCL-F68-D-NPs) were developed using the nanoprecipitation method to improve performance in brain cancer (glioblastoma) therapy. The nanoparticles were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS)/Zeta potential, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The encapsulation efficiency, loading efficiency, and yield were calculated. The in vitro release rate was determined, and the kinetic model of diosgenin release was plotted and ascertained. The cytotoxicity was checked by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide)assay against U87-MG cells (glioblastoma cell lines). The obtained nanoparticles demonstrated good size distribution, stability, morphology, chemical, and mechanical properties. The nanoparticles also possessed high encapsulation efficiency, loading efficiency, and yield. The release rate of Diosgenin was shown in a sustained manner. The in vitro cytotoxicity of PCL-F68-D-NPs showed higher toxicity against U87-MG cells than free Diosgenin.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/polym13081322DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8073865PMC
April 2021

Population data and genetic characteristics of 12 X-STR loci using the Investigator® Argus X-12 Quality Sensor kit for the Kedayan population of Borneo in Malaysia.

Int J Legal Med 2021 Jul 30;135(4):1433-1435. Epub 2021 Mar 30.

Forensic Science Programme, School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Health Campus, 16150, Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia.

DNA profiling of X-chromosomal short tandem repeats (X-STR) has exceptional value in criminal investigations, especially for complex kinship and incest cases. In this study, Investigator® Argus X-12 Quality Sensor (QS) kits were successfully used to characterize 12 X-STR loci in 199 unrelated healthy Kedayan individuals living in Sabah and Sarawak, Malaysia. The LG1 haplogroup (DXS8378 - DXS10135 - DXS10148) has the largest HD (0.9799) as compared with all other closely linked haplotype groups examined (LG2; DXS7132-DXS10074-DXS10079, LG3; DXS10103-DXS10101-HPRTB and LG4; DXS10134-DXS7423-DXS10146). Data from statistical analysis showed that high combined of PD, PD, MEC_, MEC_, MEC_, and MEC_ values (0.999999994405922, 0.99999999999999, 0.999990463834938, 0.999999975914808, 0.999999975985006, and 0.999996491927194, respectively) in the Kedayan. In a two-dimensional scaling (MDS) plot and dendrogram constructed using allele frequencies at the 12 X-STR loci, Kedayan appear to be most closely related to their other Austronesian populations including the Malays and Filipinos as compared with other reference population groups. Findings from the present study thus demonstrate high genetic variability across the 12 tested X-STR loci and can be used for population studies and forensic applications.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00414-021-02577-0DOI Listing
July 2021

Microbiologically-Synthesized Nanoparticles and Their Role in Silencing the Biofilm Signaling Cascade.

Front Microbiol 2021 25;12:636588. Epub 2021 Feb 25.

Department of Biotechnology, Maulana Abul Kalam Azad University of Technology, Haringhata, India.

The emergence of bacterial resistance to antibiotics has led to the search for alternate antimicrobial treatment strategies. Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) for efficient penetration into a living system have become more common in the world of health and hygiene. The use of microbial enzymes/proteins as a potential reducing agent for synthesizing NPs has increased rapidly in comparison to physical and chemical methods. It is a fast, environmentally safe, and cost-effective approach. Among the biogenic sources, fungi and bacteria are preferred not only for their ability to produce a higher titer of reductase enzyme to convert the ionic forms into their nano forms, but also for their convenience in cultivating and regulating the size and morphology of the synthesized NPs, which can effectively reduce the cost for large-scale manufacturing. Effective penetration through exopolysaccharides of a biofilm matrix enables the NPs to inhibit the bacterial growth. Biofilm is the consortia of sessile groups of microbial cells that are able to adhere to biotic and abiotic surfaces with the help extracellular polymeric substances and glycocalyx. These biofilms cause various chronic diseases and lead to biofouling on medical devices and implants. The NPs penetrate the biofilm and affect the quorum-sensing gene cascades and thereby hamper the cell-to-cell communication mechanism, which inhibits biofilm synthesis. This review focuses on the microbial nano-techniques that were used to produce various metallic and non-metallic nanoparticles and their "signal jamming effects" to inhibit biofilm formation. Detailed analysis and discussion is given to their interactions with various types of signal molecules and the genes responsible for the development of biofilm.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2021.636588DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7947885PMC
February 2021

Sri Petaling COVID-19 cluster in Malaysia: challenges and the mitigation strategies.

Acta Biomed 2020 11 10;91(4):e2020154. Epub 2020 Nov 10.

(1) School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Health Campus, 16150, Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia (2) Institute of Tropical Biodiversity and Sustainable Development, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, 21030 Kuala Nerus, Terengganu, Malaysia (3) Environmental Futures Research Institute, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland 4111, Australia..

.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.23750/abm.v91i4.10345DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7927555PMC
November 2020

The combinatorial diversity of KIR and HLA class I allotypes in Peninsular Malaysia.

Immunology 2021 Apr 20;162(4):389-404. Epub 2020 Dec 20.

Division of Biomedical Informatics and Personalized Medicine, Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA.

Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) interact with polymorphic human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules, modulating natural killer (NK) cell functions and affecting both the susceptibility and outcome of immune-mediated diseases. The KIR locus is highly diverse in gene content, copy number and allelic polymorphism within individuals and across geographical populations. To analyse currently under-represented Asian and Pacific populations, we investigated the combinatorial diversity of KIR and HLA class I in 92 unrelated Malay and 75 Malaysian Chinese individuals from the Malay Peninsula. We identified substantial allelic and structural diversity of the KIR locus in both populations and characterized novel variations at each analysis level. The Malay population is more diverse than Malay Chinese, likely representing a unique history including admixture with immigrating populations spanning several thousand years. Characterizing the Malay population are KIR haplotypes with large structural variants present in 10% individuals, and KIR and HLA alleles previously identified in Austronesian populations. Despite the differences in ancestries, the proportion of HLA allotypes that serve as KIR ligands is similar in each population. The exception is a significantly reduced frequency of interactions of KIR2DL1 with C2 HLA-C in the Malaysian Chinese group, caused by the low frequency of C2 HLA. One likely implication is a greater protection from preeclampsia, a pregnancy disorder associated with KIR2DL1, which shows higher incidence in the Malay than in the Malaysian Chinese. This first complete, high-resolution, characterization of combinatorial diversity of KIR and HLA in Malaysians will form a valuable reference for future clinical and population studies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imm.13289DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7968402PMC
April 2021

A review on introduced spp. and emerging concerns.

Heliyon 2020 Nov 4;6(11):e05370. Epub 2020 Nov 4.

Institute of Tropical Biodiversity and Sustainable Development, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, 21030 Kuala Nerus, Terengganu, Malaysia.

Peacock bass ( spp.) originates from the Neotropical environments of Brazil and Venezuela but, through trade and smuggling for aquarium keeping, sport fishing and aquaculture, it is now an emerging concern. Yet, less is known for spp. distribution and its ability to invade new environments. Aimed to communicate on spp. ecology, biology and introduction schemes from Scopus, Web of Science, Google Scholar and also National Centre for Biotechnology Information, this review also contains management strategies for invading fish species. While spp. can displace native fish populations, this concern is explained using ecological functions, physiological demands, direct and secondary invasion, disease tolerance and parasite spillover. Briefly, spp. has rapid embryogenesis (72 h) and matures in short periods (11-12 months), giving it an advantage to colonize new environments. With a large appetite, this true piscivore gains territorial control over water bodies by making it their feeding and nursery grounds. Perceived as an emerging concern after becoming introduced, seal-off or sport fishing were used to manage spp. but, this practice is not sustainable for the entire ecosystem. Hence, we recommend bottom-up management that involves community participation because they interact with the fish and have knowledge about their environment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2020.e05370DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7648196PMC
November 2020

The Prevalence of Transfusion-transmitted Infections among Blood Donors in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia.

Oman Med J 2020 Nov 20;35(6):e189. Epub 2020 Oct 20.

Transfusion Medicine Unit, Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan, Malaysia.

Objectives: Blood bank centers routinely screen for hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to ensure the safety of blood supply and thus prevent the dissemination of these viruses via blood transfusion. We sought to evaluate the detection of transfusion-transmitted infection (TTI) markers using standard serological methods and nucleic acid testing (NAT) among blood donors in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia.

Methods: Donated blood units were assessed for the presence or absence of HBV, HCV, and HIV using two screening method: serology and NAT. Reactive blood samples were then subjected to serological confirmatory and NAT discriminatory assays.

Results: A total of 9669 donors were recruited from September 2017 to June 2018. Among these, 36 donors were reactive either for HBV, HCV, or HIV by serological testing and eight by NAT screening. However, only 10 (three for HBV and seven for HCV) donors tested positive using serological testing and five (two for HBV and three for HCV) by NAT discriminatory assays. Note that all five NAT positive donors detected in the NAT discriminatory assays were confirmed to be serologically reactive. Therefore, the prevalence of HBV, HCV, and HIV was 0.03%, 0.1%, and 0.0%, respectively, in our donor pool.

Conclusions: Both serological and NAT screening and confirmatory assays should be used routinely to reduce the risk of infection transmission via the transfusion of blood and blood components.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5001/omj.2020.86DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7577371PMC
November 2020

Structural Characterization and Antioxidant Potential of Chitosan by γ-Irradiation from the Carapace of Horseshoe Crab.

Polymers (Basel) 2020 Oct 15;12(10). Epub 2020 Oct 15.

School of Biotechnology, GIET University, Gunupur 765022, Odisha, India.

Natural product extraction is ingenuity that permits the mass manufacturing of specific products in a cost-effective manner. With the aim of obtaining an alternative chitosan supply, the carapace of dead horseshoe crabs seemed feasible. This sparked an investigation of the structural changes and antioxidant capacity of horseshoe crab chitosan (HCH) by γ-irradiation using Co source. Chitosan was extracted from the horseshoe crab (; Müller) carapace using heterogeneous chemical -deacetylation of chitin, followed by the irradiation of HCH using Co at a dose-dependent rate of 10 kGy/hour. The average molecular weight was determined by the viscosimetric method. Regarding the chemical properties, the crystal-like structures obtained from γ-irradiated chitosan powders were determined using Fourier transfer infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. The change in chitosan structure was evident with dose-dependent rates between 10 and 20 kGy/hour. The antioxidant properties of horseshoe crab-derived chitosan were evaluated in vitro. The 20 kGy γ-irradiation applied to chitosan changed the structure and reduced the molecular weight, providing sufficient degradation for an increase in antioxidant activity. Our findings indicate that horseshoe crab chitosan can be employed for both scald-wound healing and long-term food preservation due to its buffer-like and radical ion scavenging ability.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/polym12102361DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7602389PMC
October 2020

Autosomal STR Profiling and Databanking in Malaysia: Current Status and Future Prospects.

Genes (Basel) 2020 09 23;11(10). Epub 2020 Sep 23.

Institute of Tropical Biodiversity and Sustainable Development, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, Kuala Nerus 21030, Terengganu, Malaysia.

Science and technology are extensively used in criminal investigation. From the mid- to late-1980s, one of the scientific discoveries that has had a particularly remarkable impact on this field has been the use of highly variable DNA sequence regions (minisatellites) in the human genome for individual identification. The technique was initially referred to as DNA fingerprinting, but is now more widely referred to as DNA profiling. Since then, many new developments have occurred within this area of science. These include the introduction of new genetic markers (microsatellites also known as short tandem repeats/STRs), the use of the polymerase chain reaction for target amplification, the development of DNA databases (databanking), and the advancement and/or improvement of genotyping protocols and technologies. In 2019, we described the progress of DNA profiling and DNA databanking in Malaysia for the first time. This report included information on DNA analysis regulations and legislation, STR genotyping protocols, database management, and accreditation status. Here, we provide an update on the performance of our DNA databank (numbers of DNA profiles and hits) plus the technical issues associated with correctly assigning the weight of evidence for DNA profiles in an ethnically diverse population, and the potential application of rapid DNA testing in the country. A total of 116,534 DNA profiles were obtained and stored in the Forensic DNA Databank of Malaysia (FDDM) by 2019, having increased from 70,570 in 2017. The number of hits increased by more than three-fold in just two years, where 17 and 69 hits between the DNA profiles stored in the FDDM and those from crime scenes, suspects, detainees, drug users, convicts, missing persons, or volunteers were recorded in 2017 and 2019, respectively. Forensic DNA analysis and databanking are thus progressing well in Malaysia and have already contributed to many criminal investigations. However, several other issues are discussed here, including the need for STR population data for uncharacterized population groups, and pilot trials for adopting rapid DNA profiling technology. These aspects should be considered by policy makers and law enforcement agencies in order to increase the reliability and efficiency of DNA profiling in criminal cases and in kinship analysis in Malaysia.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/genes11101112DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7597947PMC
September 2020

Dataset on 21 autosomal and two sex determining short tandem repeat loci in the Kedayan population in Borneo, Malaysia.

Data Brief 2020 Aug 21;31:105909. Epub 2020 Jun 21.

Forensic Science Programme, School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Health Campus, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia.

This data article provides population frequencies for 21 autosomal and two sex determining short tandem repeat (STR) loci in unrelated Kedayan individuals. This article is related to the research paper entitled "Forensic parameters and ancestral fraction in the Kedayan population inferred using 21 autosomal STR loci" [1] where these same data were subjected to ancestry and forensic analyses. We have collected 200 blood samples consisting of 128 male and 72 female volunteer representatives from Kedayan people residing in various parts of Borneo. All 23 STR loci were simultaneously amplified using Globalfiler™ Express PCR and amplicons were separated using an ABI 3500xl Genetic Analyzer. The STR allele calls at each locus were called using GeneMapper ID-X Software v1.4, while several algorithms in Arlequin software version 3.5 were used to estimate Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) and linkage disequilibrium (LD) between pairs of STR loci.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2020.105909DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7334294PMC
August 2020

Population dataset for 21 simple tandem repeat loci in the Akan population of Ghana.

Data Brief 2020 Aug 22;31:105746. Epub 2020 May 22.

School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Health Campus, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia.

Short tandem repeat (STR) loci are widely used as genetic marker for ancestral and forensic analyses. The latter application includes for paternity testing and DNA profiling of samples collected from scenes of crime and suspects. This survey provides the first dataset for 21 STR loci across the Akan population in Ghana by genotyping of 109 unrelated healthy individuals using Investigator 24plex kit. None of the STR loci screened deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after applying Bonferroni correction. Overall, 224 unique alleles were observed with allele frequencies ranging from 0.005 to 0.518. The combined match probability, combined power of exclusion and combined power discrimination were 1 in 4.07 × 10, 0.999999999 and 1, respectively. Principal coordinate analysis carried out using 21 STR allele frequency data mapped the Akans with Nigerian subpopulation groups (Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba), but separated from Thais of Thailand, Chechen of Jordan and Tijuana of Mexico.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2020.105746DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7262416PMC
August 2020

Population data for 23 Y chromosome STR loci using the Powerplex® Y23 STR kit for the Kedayan population in Malaysia.

Int J Legal Med 2020 Jul 2;134(4):1335-1337. Epub 2020 Jan 2.

Forensic Science Programme, School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Health Campus, 16150, Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia.

Genetic polymorphisms at 23 Y chromosome short tandem repeat (STRs) loci included in the Powerplex® Y23 PCR kit were successfully scored in 128 unrelated Kedayan individuals living in Sabah, East Malaysia. Complete haplotypes were recorded for all individuals and included 92 different types with 72 being unique to single male subjects. Three important forensic statistics were calculated from these data; haplotype diversity = 0.993, discriminating capacity = 0.719, and match probability = 0.015. The Kedayan appear to be most closely related to Malays and Filipinos in a multidimensional scaling plot and are separated from other mainland Asia populations including Thais and Hakka Han. These new data for Kedayan have been deposited in the YHRD database (accession number: YA004621). Our statistical analyses showed the reliability of Y-STR loci for geographically extended use in forensic casework and for studying human population history.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00414-019-02237-4DOI Listing
July 2020

Violent crime datasets: Incidence and patterns in Malaysia from 2006 to 2017.

Data Brief 2019 Oct 3;26:104449. Epub 2019 Sep 3.

School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Health Campus, 16150, Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia.

This article provides violent crime data in Malaysia from 2006 to 2017. The violent crimes include murder, rape, gang robbery, robbery and voluntarily causing hurt cases. A total of 330,395 violent crime cases were reported in this 12 year period and the data were tabulated state by state for all thirteen states of Malaysia, including two states in Borneo (Sabah and Sarawak) and one federal territory (Kuala Lumpur). In general, violent crimes show a decreasing trend from 2006 to 2017 in Malaysia. However, armed gang robbery and armed robbery show a fluctuating pattern from 2008 to 2011. A similar pattern was also recorded for unarmed gang robbery from 2008 to 2010. The violent crime data deposited here are available for further analysis, e.g., for identifying risk factors such as demography, lifestyle, socio-economic status, government policies etc. which may be associated with violent crime incidence and pattern across the country.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2019.104449DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6811922PMC
October 2019

Human neutrophil antigen frequency data for Malays, Chinese and Indians.

Transfus Apher Sci 2020 Apr 4;59(2):102651. Epub 2019 Oct 4.

School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Health Campus, Kelantan, Malaysia. Electronic address:

Background: Human neutrophil antigens (HNAs) are implicated in several clinical disorders and their allelic variations have been reported for many populations. This new study was aimed to report the genotype and alleles frequencies of HNA-1, -3, -4 and -5 loci in Malays, Chinese and Indians in Peninsular Malaysia.

Methods: A total of 222 blood samples were collected from healthy, unrelated Malay, Chinese and Indian individuals. Their HNA-1, -3 and -4 and HNA-5 loci were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP) or PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assays.

Results: All HNA loci are polymorphic, except for HNA -4. Geneotypes HNA-1a/1b, -3a/3b and -4a/4a were observed most frequently at these three loci in all three ethnic groups. In contrast, HNA-5a/5b and -5a/5a were observed as the predominant genotypes in Malays vs. Chinese and Indians, respectively. The Malays, Chinese and Indians shared HNA -3a (0.505-0.527), HNA -4a (1.000) and -5a (0.676-0.854) as the most frequent alleles. However, HNA-1a was found to be the most common in Malays (0.506) and Chinese (0.504) and HNA-1b for Indians (0.525).

Conclusion: Combined with HNA data that have been published for Malay subethnic and Orang Asli groups, this study provides the first fully comprehensive HNA dataset for populations to be found in Peninsular Malaysia. Overall, our findings provide further evidence of genetic complexity in the region. This now publicly available HNA dataset can be used as a reliable reference source for improving medical outcomes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.transci.2019.09.004DOI Listing
April 2020

Assessment of autosomal and male DNA extracted from casework samples using Casework Direct Kit, Custom and Maxwell 16 System DNA IQ Casework Pro Kit for autosomal-STR and Y-STR profiling.

Sci Rep 2019 10 10;9(1):14558. Epub 2019 Oct 10.

Forensic Science Programme, School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Health Campus, 16150, Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia.

Short repetitive regions in autosomal and Y chromosomes known as short tandem repeats (STRs) are currently used for DNA profiling in crime investigations. However, DNA profiling requires a sufficient quality and quantity of DNA template, which is often not obtained from trace evidence or degraded biological samples collected at the scene of a crime. Here, we assessed autosomal and male DNA components extracted from crime scene and mock casework samples using the Casework Direct Kit, Custom and compared the results against those obtained by extraction of matching samples using well-established Maxwell 16 System DNA IQ Casework Pro Kit. The quantity and quality of extracted DNA obtained using both Casework Direct Kit, Custom and Maxwell 16 System DNA IQ Casework Pro Kit were analyzed using PowerQuant Systems followed by autosomal and Y-chromosome STR profiling using GlobalFiler Express PCR Amplification Kit and PowerPlex Y23 System, respectively. Our results showed that the Casework Direct Kit and Maxwell 16 DNA IQ Casework Pro Kit have more or less equal capacity to extract inhibitor free DNA, but that the latter produces slightly better quality and more DNA template and subsequently higher numbers of STR allele calls for autosomal and Y-STR analyses. Nonetheless, the Casework Direct Kit, Custom is the quicker and cheaper option for extraction of good, clean DNA from high content material and might best be used for extraction of reference samples. Such reference DNA samples typically come from buccal swabs or freshly drawn blood. So, in general, they can confidently be expected to have a high nucleic acid content and to be inhibitor-free.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-51154-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6787247PMC
October 2019

Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I and II datasets for sudanese.

Data Brief 2019 Jun 21;24:104027. Epub 2019 May 21.

Department of Immunology, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Services, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, P.O Box 51900, United Arab Emirates.

Sudan is located in the heart of Africa and surrounded by eight countries with people of different ethnic origins. Historical records show that the population of the Sudan is a mixture of Arabic, West Asian Arabic and sub-Saharan African elements. The present survey provides data on allele lineages, and haplotype frequencies of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I (HLA-A and HLA-B) and class II (HLA-DR and -HLA-DQ) loci in 11 Sudanese populations. The sampled individuals are all local transplant donors who provided informed consent for HLA analyses on their blood samples and were registered at National Cancer Institute, University of Gezira, Wad Medani. The HLA class I and II data reported here can be subjected for future analyses of genetic structure and health in Sudan. These include as reference datasets for identifying the association between HLA and diseases and for designing donor recruitment strategies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2019.104027DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6545336PMC
June 2019

Population data of 23 Y chromosome STR loci for the five major human subpopulations of Ghana.

Int J Legal Med 2020 Jul 1;134(4):1313-1315. Epub 2019 Jun 1.

School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Health Campus, 16150, Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia.

In this study, 268 samples for unrelated males belonging to the five major human subpopulation groups in Ghana (Akan, Ewe, Mole-Dagbon, Ga-Dangme and Guang) were genetically characterised for 23 Y chromosome short tandem repeat (STR) loci using the Powerplex® Y23 STR kit. A total of 263 complete haplotypes were recorded of which 258 were unique. The haplotype diversity, discriminating capacity and match probability for the pooled population data were 0.9998, 0.9627 and 0.0039, respectively. The pairwise genetic distance (R) for the Ghanaian datasets and other reference populations deposited in the Y-STR Haplotype Reference Database (YHRD) were estimated and mapped using multidimensional scaling (MDS) plot. The Guang and Ewe were significantly different from the Akan, Mole-Dagbon and Ga-Dangme. However, the five Ghanaian datasets were all plotted close together with other African populations in the MDS data mapping.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00414-019-02099-wDOI Listing
July 2020

Compendium of hand, foot and mouth disease data in Malaysia from years 2010-2017.

Data Brief 2019 Jun 20;24:103868. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Institute of Tropical Biodiversity and Sustainable Development, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, 21030 Kuala Nerus, Terengganu, Malaysia.

This data article is constructed using information from hand, foot and mouth disease outbreaks in every Malaysian state. Important information like total number of cases from every state and age group, humidity, air temperature and wind as well as types of viruses isolated from patients infected with hand, foot and mouth disease were gathered and sorted into four tables. The information sources include Malaysian Administrative Modernisation and Management Planning Unit (MAMPU), National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Since the Ministry of Health Malaysia only begun archiving hand, foot and mouth disease cases between years 2010-2017 in MAMPU, weather data extractions are following the similar timeline. Conversely, published data on viruses and their serotypes associated to hand, foot and mouth disease were extracted from NCBI but, data availability were limited between the years 2010 and 2014.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2019.103868DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6441719PMC
June 2019

Transfusion Medicine and Molecular Genetic Methods.

Int J Prev Med 2018 16;9:45. Epub 2018 May 16.

School of Health Sciences, Health Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan, Malaysia.

Transfusion procedures are always complicated by potential genetic mismatching between donor and recipient. Compatibility is determined by several major antigens, such as the ABO and Rhesus blood groups. Matching for other blood groups (Kell, Kidd, Duffy, and MNS), human platelet antigens, and human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) also contributes toward the successful transfusion outcomes, especially in multitransfused or highly immunized patients. All these antigens of tissue identity are highly polymorphic and thus present great challenges for finding suitable donors for transfusion patients. The ABO blood group and HLA markers are also the determinants of transplant compatibility, and mismatched antigens will cause graft rejection or graft-versus-host disease. Thus, a single and comprehensive registry covering all of the significant transfusion and transplantation antigens is expected to become an important tool in providing an efficient service capable of delivering safe blood and quickly locating matching organs/stem cells. This review article is intended as an accessible guide for physicians who care for transfusion-dependent patients. In particular, it serves to introduce the new molecular screening methods together with the biology of these systems, which underlies the tests.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijpvm.IJPVM_232_16DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5981227PMC
May 2018

Human platelet antigen allelic diversity in Peninsular Malaysia.

Immunohematology 2016 Dec;32(4):143-160

Forensic Programme, School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 2016

Distribution of HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 alleles in the Kensiu and Semai Orang Asli sub-groups in Peninsular Malaysia.

Hum Immunol 2016 Aug 11;77(8):618-619. Epub 2016 Jun 11.

Human Identification Unit, School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Health Campus, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia; Institute for Research in Molecular Medicine, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Health Campus, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia. Electronic address:

The earliest settlers in Peninsular Malaysia are the Orang Asli population, namely Semang, Senoi and Proto Malays. In the present study, we typed the HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 loci of the Kensiu and Semai Orang Asli sub-groups. Sequence-based HLA typing was performed on 59 individuals from two Orang Asli sub-groups. A total of 11, 18 and 14 HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 alleles were identified, respectively. These data are available in the Allele Frequencies Net Database under the population name "Malaysia Kedah Kensiu" and "Malaysia Pahang Semai".
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.humimm.2016.06.009DOI Listing
August 2016

The genetic history of Peninsular Malaysia.

Gene 2016 Jul 7;586(1):129-35. Epub 2016 Apr 7.

Forensic Science Programme, School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Health Campus, Kelantan, Malaysia. Electronic address:

This article explores the genetic history of the various sub-populations currently living in Peninsular Malaysia. This region has received multiple waves of migrants like the Orang Asli in prehistoric times and the Chinese, Indians, Europeans and Arabs during historic times. There are three highly distinct lineages that make up the Orang Asli; Semang, Senoi and Proto-Malays. The Semang, who have 'Negrito' characteristics, represent the first human settlers in Peninsular Malaysia arriving from about 50,000ya. The Senoi later migrated from Indochina and are a mix between an Asian Neolithic population and the Semang. These Asian genomes probably came in before Austroasiatic languages arrived between 5000 and 4000years ago. Semang and Senoi both now speak Austro-Asiatic languages indicative of cultural diffusion from Senoi to Semang. In contrast, the Proto-Malays who came last to the southern part of this region speak Austronesian language and are Austronesians with some Negrito admixture. It is from this group that the contemporary Malays emerged. Here we provide an overview of the best available genetic evidences (single nucleotide polymorphisms, mitochondrial DNA, Y-chromosome, blood groups, human platelet antigen, human leukocyte antigen, human neutrophil antigen and killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor) supporting the complex genetic history of Peninsular Malaysia. Large scale sampling and high throughput genetic screening programmes such as those using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism analyses have provided insights into various ancestral and admixture genetic fractions in this region. Given the now extensive admixture present in the contemporary descendants of ancient sub-populations in Peninsular Malaysia, improved reconstruction of human migration history in this region will require new evidence from ancient DNA in well-preserved skeletons. All other aspects of the highly diverse and complex genetic makeup in Peninsular Malaysia should be considered carefully for genetic mapping of disease loci and policy formation by health authorities.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gene.2016.04.008DOI Listing
July 2016

Molecular blood group typing in Banjar, Jawa, Mandailing and Kelantan Malays in Peninsular Malaysia.

Transfus Apher Sci 2015 Aug 16;53(1):69-73. Epub 2015 Mar 16.

Human Identification Unit, School of Health Sciences, Health Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan, Malaysia. Electronic address:

In this study we genotyped ABO, Rhesus, Kell, Kidd and Duffy blood group loci in DNA samples from 120 unrelated individuals representing four Malay subethnic groups living in Peninsular Malaysia (Banjar: n = 30, Jawa: n = 30, Mandailing: n = 30 and Kelantan: n = 30). Analyses were performed using commercial polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP) typing kits (BAG Health Care GmbH, Lich, Germany). Overall, the present study has successfully compiled blood group datasets for the four Malay subethnic groups and used the datasets for studying ancestry and health.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.transci.2015.03.009DOI Listing
August 2015

Sequence polymorphisms of mtDNA HV1, HV2, and HV3 regions in the Malay population of Peninsular Malaysia.

Int J Legal Med 2010 Sep 26;124(5):415-26. Epub 2010 May 26.

School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Health Campus, Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, 16150, Malaysia.

The uniparentally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is in the limelight for the past two decades, in studies relating to demographic history of mankind and in forensic kinship testing. In this study, human mtDNA hypervariable segments 1, 2, and 3 (HV1, HV2, and HV3) were analyzed in 248 unrelated Malay individuals in Peninsular Malaysia. Combined analyses of HV1, HV2, and HV3 revealed a total of 180 mtDNA haplotypes with 149 unique haplotypes and 31 haplotypes occurring in more than one individual. The genetic diversity was estimated to be 99.47%, and the probability of any two individuals sharing the same mtDNA haplotype was 0.93%. The most frequent mtDNA haplotype (73, 146, 150, 195, 263, 315.1C, 16140, 16182C, 16183C, 16189, 16217, 16274, and 16335) was shared by 11 (4.44%) individuals. The nucleotide diversity and mean of pair-wise differences were found to be 0.036063 ± 0.020101 and 12.544022 ± 6.230486, respectively.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00414-010-0469-xDOI Listing
September 2010

HLA polymorphism in six Malay subethnic groups in Malaysia.

Hum Immunol 2009 Jul 11;70(7):518-26. Epub 2009 Apr 11.

School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Health Campus, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia.

In this study, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II were examined through sequence-specific primer typing in 176 unrelated individuals from six Malay subethnic groups of Peninsular Malaysia: Kelantan (n = 25), Minangkabau (34), Jawa (30), Bugis (31), Banjar (33), and Rawa (23). The most common HLA alleles in all groups were A*24 (26-41%), Cw*07 (24-32%), B*15 (22-30%), DRB1*12 (15-36%), and DQB1*03 (25-51%). The Malay subethnic groups studied demonstrated a close relationship to each other and to other Asian populations, despite specific differences between them. Banjar, Bugis, and Jawa Malays demonstrated no significant difference from each other, which could be a result of their related origin from the islands around the Java Sea. These three Malay subethnic groups were then collapsed into one group, which also helped to increase the sample number and sharpen statistical results. Minangkabau and Rawa Malays exhibited high similarities in allele group and haplotype frequencies, which could be a consequence of their common origin from Sumatera. Kelantan Malays, in addition to their statistically significant differences compared with the other groups, also exhibited differences on the most frequent haplotypes, which are almost absent in the other subethnic groups studied.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.humimm.2009.04.003DOI Listing
July 2009