Publications by authors named "Hind Alhatmi"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Infections and patterns of antibiotic utilization in support and comfort care patients: A tertiary care center experience.

J Infect Public Health 2021 Jul 26;14(7):839-844. Epub 2021 May 26.

Department of Health Informatics, CPHHI, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Data and Business Intelligence Management Department, ISID, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Purpose: Little is known regarding the burden of infections and clinical practice towards hospitalized patients with limits on life-sustaining measures. We aim to describe the infectious syndromes, clinical care, the emergence of multi-drug resistant organisms and outcomes in this population.

Patients And Methods: Retrospective cohort of patients labeled as support or comfort care in a tertiary care center between 2016-2019.

Results: A total of 347 patients were included with a mean age of 68.5 years, who were predominantly males (59.94%), bedbound (69.74%), on tube feeding (66.86%), and required indwelling urinary catheters (61.96%). The total number of admissions during the first year was 498, with the mean length of stay being 30 days. The number of infectious syndromes identified during that period was 821episodes, with a mean of 2 infectious syndromes per admission. The most common infection identified was pneumonia (41.66%) followed by urinary tract infections (27.16%). A total of 3891 microbiological cultures were taken with a mean of 5 cultures per infectious syndrome. The most commonly identified pathogens were Gram-negative bacteria (61.03%), with a high rate of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) (48.53%). The one-year mortality was 86.4%. Using carbapenem antibiotic and pneumonia were the independent predictors used for the MDROs.

Conclusion: Our study reflects the high burden of infections, antimicrobial resistance, and hospital admissions among a population with limited life expectancy. A consensus regarding investigating and managing of infectious syndromes, and antimicrobial prescription is needed to reduce the harms associated with overuse of antimicrobials.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jiph.2021.05.002DOI Listing
July 2021

Nationwide Seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 in Saudi Arabia.

J Infect Public Health 2021 Jul 24;14(7):832-838. Epub 2021 Apr 24.

King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Background: Estimated seroprevalence of Coronavirus Infectious Disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a critical evidence for a better evaluation of the virus spread and monitoring the progress of COVID-19 pandemic in a population. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence has been reported in specific regions, but an extensive nationwide study has not been reported. Here, we report a nationwide study to determine the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 in the population of KSA during the pandemic, using serum samples from healthy blood donors, non-COVID patients and healthcare workers (HCWs) in six different regions of the kingdom, with addition samples from COVID-19 patients.

Methods: A total of 11,703 serum samples were collected from different regions of the KSA including; 5395 samples from residual healthy blood donors (D); 5877 samples from non-COVID patients collected through residual sera at clinical biochemistry labs from non-COVID patients (P); and 400 samples from consented HCWs. To determine the seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2, all serum samples, in addition to positive control sera from RT-PCR confirmed COVID-19 patients, were subjected to in-house ELISA with a sample pooling strategy, which was further validated by testing individual samples that make up some of the pools, with a statistical estimation method to report seroprevalence estimates.

Results: Overall (combining D and P groups) seroprevalence estimate was around 11% in Saudi Arabia; and was 5.1% (Riyadh), 1.5% (Jazan), 18.4% (Qassim), 20.8% (Hail), 14.7% (ER; Alahsa), and 18.8% in Makkah. Makkah samples were only D group and had a rate of 24.4% and 12.8% in the cities of Makkah and Jeddah, respectively. The seroprevalence in Saudi Arabia across the sampled areas would be 12 times the reported COVID-19 infection rate. Among HCWs, 7.5% (4.95-10.16 CI 95%) had reactive antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 without reporting any previously confirmed infection. This was higher in HCWs with hypertension. The study also presents the demographics and prevalence of co-morbidities in HCWs and subset of non-COVID-19 population.

Interpretation: Our study estimates the overall national serological prevalence of COVID-19 in Saudi Arabia to be 11%, with an apparent disparity between regions. This indicates the prevalence of asymptomatic or mild unreported COVID-19 cases.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jiph.2021.04.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8188888PMC
July 2021
-->