Publications by authors named "Hillary K Hecht"

5 Publications

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Symptom distress and quality of life among Black Americans with cancer and their family caregivers.

Psychooncology 2021 Apr 2. Epub 2021 Apr 2.

School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

Objective: Black Americans are disproportionately affected by cancer and chronic diseases. Black patients with cancer and their family caregivers may concurrently experience symptoms that influence their wellbeing. This study investigates the influence of mental and physical symptom distress on quality of life (QOL) among Black Americans with cancer and their family caregivers from a dyadic perspective.

Methods: One hundred and fifty-one dyads comprised of a Black American with breast, colorectal, lung or prostate cancer and a Black family caregiver were included in this secondary analysis of pooled baseline data from three studies. Self-reports of problems managing 13 symptoms were used to measure mental and physical symptom distress. Descriptive statistics and the actor-partner interdependence model were used to examine symptom prevalence and the influence of each person's symptom distress on their own and each other's QOL.

Results: Fatigue, sleep problems, pain and mental distress were prevalent. Patients and caregivers reported similar levels of mental distress; however, patients reported higher physical distress. Increased patient mental distress was associated with decreased patient QOL (overall, emotional, social, functional). Increased patient physical distress was associated with decreased patient QOL (overall, physical, emotional, functional) and decreased caregiver emotional wellbeing. Increased caregiver mental distress was associated with decreased caregiver QOL (overall, emotional, social, functional) and decreased patient overall QOL. Increased caregiver physical distress was associated with decreased caregiver QOL (overall, physical, functional), decreased patient emotional wellbeing, and better patient social wellbeing.

Conclusions: Supporting symptom management in Black patient/caregiver dyads may improve their QOL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pon.5691DOI Listing
April 2021

Chronic Disease Among African American Families: A Systematic Scoping Review.

Prev Chronic Dis 2020 12 31;17:E167. Epub 2020 Dec 31.

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Health Behavior, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Introduction: Chronic diseases are common among African Americans, but the extent to which research has focused on addressing chronic diseases across multiple members of African American families is unclear. This systematic scoping review summarizes the characteristics of research addressing coexisting chronic conditions among African American families, including guiding theories, conditions studied, types of relationships, study outcomes, and intervention research.

Methods: The literature search was conducted in PsycInfo, PubMed, Social Work Abstracts, Sociological Abstracts, CINAHL, and Family and Society Studies Worldwide to identify relevant articles published from January 2000 through September 2016. We screened the title and abstracts of 9,170 articles, followed by full-text screening of 530 articles, resulting in a final sample of 114 articles. Fifty-seven percent (n = 65) of the articles cited a guiding theory/framework, with psychological theories (eg, social cognitive theory, transtheoretical model) being most prominent. The most common conditions studied in families were depression (70.2%), anxiety (23.7%), and diabetes (22.8%), with most articles focusing on a combination of physical and mental health conditions (47.4%).

Results: In the 114 studies in this review, adult family members were primarily the index person (71.1%, n = 81). The index condition, when identified (79.8%, n = 91), was more likely to be a physical health condition (46.5%, n = 53) than a mental health condition (29.8%, n = 34). Among 343 family relationships examined, immediate family relationships were overwhelmingly represented (85.4%, n = 293); however, extended family (12.0%, n = 41) and fictive kin (0.6%, n = 2) were included. Most (57.0%, n = 65) studies focused on a single category of outcomes, such as physical health (eg, obesity, glycemic control), mental health (eg, depression, anxiety, distress), psychosocial outcomes (eg, social support, caregiver burden), or health behaviors (eg, medication adherence, disease management, health care utilization); however, 43.0% (n = 49) of studies focused on outcomes across multiple categories. Sixteen intervention articles (14.0%) were identified, with depression the most common condition of interest.

Conclusion: Recognizing the multiple, simultaneous health issues facing families through a lens of family comorbidity and family multimorbidity may more accurately mirror the lived experiences of many African American families and better elucidate intervention opportunities than previous approaches.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5888/pcd17.190431DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7784550PMC
December 2020

Intersecting Experiences of Healthcare Denials Among Transgender and Nonbinary Patients.

Am J Prev Med 2020 04 28;58(4):506-513. Epub 2020 Jan 28.

Indiana University School of Social Work, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Introduction: Transgender and nonbinary individuals experience high levels of health disparities and are more likely to experience denials of health care than their cisgender (nontransgender) counterparts. There is a lack of evidence on how healthcare denials vary by gender identity and other intersecting identity characteristics in the transgender and nonbinary populations.

Methods: Using data from the 2015 U.S. Trans Survey (n=27,715), multivariate logistic regressions were used to analyze (in 2019) the increased likelihood of experiencing denials of trans-related care and standard care across socioeconomic and identity characteristics among the transgender and nonbinary population, including race, age, educational attainment, disability, income, and gender identity.

Results: Almost 8% of the participants had been denied trans-specific health care, and >3% had been refused general health care. Transgender (compared with nonbinary), older, biracial, or multiracial, and lower-income participants, as well as those with less than a high school diploma and those with disabilities, were significantly more likely to experience refusal of care in general or trans-specific healthcare settings.

Conclusions: There is a need for better training of healthcare providers to be inclusive and reduce denial rates of their transgender and nonbinary patients. However, it is also clear that current rates of denial must be considered through a whole-person lens, considering the experience of concurrent oppressed identities and recognizing the increased risk those with multiple marginalized identities experience in being denied needed health care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2019.11.014DOI Listing
April 2020

Correlations between healthcare provider interactions and mental health among transgender and nonbinary adults.

SSM Popul Health 2020 Apr 29;10:100525. Epub 2019 Nov 29.

Michigan State University School of Social Work, 655 Auditorium Road, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA.

Transgender and nonbinary patients have a wide array of experiences when attempting to access healthcare, including discrimination and having to educate providers about trans people. This study examines the mental health factors connected to transgender and nonbinary patients' experience with providers to determine the likelihood of transgender or nonbinary patients receiving respectful care after a provider knows about the patient's gender identity, and patients' experience of having to educate providers about trans people, controlling for sociodemographic factor. Using data from the 2015 United States Trans Survey ( = 27,715), chi-square tests of independence and multivariate logistic regressions were used to explore the odds of transgender or nonbinary individuals having a positive experience with a doctor or healthcare provider. Of the respondents, 24.31% experienced having to educate a provider about trans people when seeking care, and 62.90% experienced a provider knowing they were transgender or nonbinary and treating them with respect. Those experiencing depression and suicidal thoughts were significantly less likely to have had a provider treat them with respect, and significantly more likely to need to educate their providers. Gender, age, disability status, and educational level were significant across both variables; income was significant regarding having to educate a provider. Healthcare providers need ongoing training and education to improve their care of transgender and nonbinary patients, specifically around acknowledging the multiple backgrounds and experiences of such patients, including those related to mental health, gender, race, age, income, educational level, and disability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ssmph.2019.100525DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6909214PMC
April 2020

Mental health care use in men with comorbid diabetes and depression: The role of age and race.

Health Educ Care 2019 Oct 1;4(3). Epub 2019 Oct 1.

School of Medicine, University Michigan, USA.

Objectives: Older adults with diabetes have double the normal average risk for depression. While women also report higher rates of depression, men are less likely than women to recognize symptoms and seek assistance for mental health treatment. Racial disparities in mental health care use among men have also been identified. While age and gender differences in mental health care use have been accounted for in adults with comorbid diabetes and depression little is known about within group differences among men. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of age and race on mental health service use in a sample of men with comorbid diabetes and depression.

Methods: This study utilized secondary data from a large health care delivery system serving in a Midwestern urban city and included 335 Black, and non-Latino White men with comorbid type 2 diabetes and depression.

Results And Discussion: Findings indicate that men under the age of 55 were less likely to experience a 6-month or more delay in receiving a psychiatric medication prescription after their initial depression diagnosis. Black men over 55 years of age were significantly more likely to experience a delay of over six months to receiving psychiatric medication. More research is needed to explore preferred depression treatment methods for older Black men with type 2 diabetes, in addition to any issues with access to pharmacological medications to treat depression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15761/hec.1000163DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8049769PMC
October 2019