Publications by authors named "Hien D Liu"

18 Publications

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Impact of infused CD34+ stem cell dosing for allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation with post-transplant cyclophosphamide.

Bone Marrow Transplant 2021 Mar 3. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

Department of Bone Marrow Transplant and Cellular Immunotherapy, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA.

Higher infused total nucleated cell dose (TNC) in allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) with post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PTCy) is associated with improved overall survival. As many centers prefer peripheral blood stem cell grafts (PBSCT) with PTCy, the effect of cell dose on outcomes with this platform also requires elucidation. We retrospectively evaluated 144 consecutive adult patients who received allogeneic T-cell replete PBSCT with PTCy-based graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis for a hematologic malignancy from 2012-2018. The infused CD34+ cell dose was stratified into low (<5 × 10/kg), intermediate (5-10 × 10/kg) and high (>10 × 10/kg) dose level groups. In multivariate analysis, the low CD34+ cell dose group had worse non-relapse mortality (HR = 4.51, 95% CI: 1.92-10.58, p < 0.001), progression- free survival (HR = 4.11, 95% CI: 2.07-8.15, p < 0.001), and overall survival (HR = 4.06, 95% CI: 2.00-8.25, p ≤ 0.001) compared to the intermediate group. Clinical outcomes between the intermediate and high CD34+ cell dose groups were similar. TNC and CD3+ cell dose had no significant impacts on outcomes. These findings suggest that, in patients receiving allogeneic PBSCT with PTCy, infused CD34+ cell doses >5 × 10 cells/kg may result in improved survival. Thus, this study supports targeting a CD34+ cell dose of >5 × 10 cells/kg for allogeneic PBSCT with PTCy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41409-021-01219-8DOI Listing
March 2021

Acute patient-reported outcomes in B-cell malignancies treated with axicabtagene ciloleucel.

Cancer Med 2021 03 28;10(6):1936-1943. Epub 2021 Feb 28.

Moffitt Cancer Center, Department of Health Outcomes and Behavior, Tampa, FL, USA.

Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy with axicabtagene ciloleucel (axi-cel) has considerably improved survival in adults with relapsed/refractory large B-cell lymphoma. This study reports patient-reported outcomes (PROs) such as quality of life (QOL) and toxicity in the first 90 days after treatment. Hematologic cancer patients treated with axi-cel (N = 103, mean age = 61, 39% female) completed SF-36 or PROMIS-29 QOL questionnaires prior to treatment and 90 days after. PRO-Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events toxicity items were completed by patients at baseline and 14, 30, 60, and 90 days after treatment. Mixed models examined change in PROs over time. From preinfusion to 90 days later, patients reported improvements in physical functioning, pain, and fatigue (ps < 0.01), but worsening of anxiety (p = 0.02). Patient-reported toxicities worsened by day 14 with improvement thereafter. The five most severe symptoms at day 14 included fatigue, decreased appetite, dry mouth, diarrhea frequency, and problems with concentration. Results indicate improvement in some domains of QOL over time with transient patient-reported toxicities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cam4.3664DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7957158PMC
March 2021

Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in the Treatment of Newly Diagnosed Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia: An Evidence-Based Review from the American Society of Transplantation and Cellular Therapy.

Transplant Cell Ther 2021 Jan 20;27(1):6-20. Epub 2020 Sep 20.

EBMT Paris Study Office, Paris, France; Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel.

The role of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in the management of newly diagnosed adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is reviewed and critically evaluated in this evidence-based review. An AML expert panel, consisting of both transplant and nontransplant experts, was invited to develop clinically relevant frequently asked questions covering disease- and HCT-related topics. A systematic literature review was conducted to generate core recommendations that were graded based on the quality and strength of underlying evidence based on the standardized criteria established by the American Society of Transplantation and Cellular Therapy Steering Committee for evidence-based reviews. Allogeneic HCT offers a survival benefit in patients with intermediate- and high-risk AML and is currently a part of standard clinical care. We recommend the preferential use of myeloablative conditioning in eligible patients. A haploidentical related donor marrow graft is preferred over a cord blood unit in the absence of a fully HLA-matched donor. The evolving role of allogeneic HCT in the context of measurable residual disease monitoring and recent therapeutic advances in AML with regards to maintenance therapy after HCT are also discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2020.09.020DOI Listing
January 2021

High metabolic tumor volume is associated with decreased efficacy of axicabtagene ciloleucel in large B-cell lymphoma.

Blood Adv 2020 07;4(14):3268-3276

Department of Blood and Marrow Transplant and Cellular Immunotherapy, and.

High metabolic tumor volume (MTV) predicts worse outcomes in lymphoma treated with chemotherapy. However, it is unknown if this holds for patients treated with axicabtagene ciloleucel (axi-cel), an anti-CD19 targeted chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy. The primary objective of this retrospective study was to investigate the relationship between MTV and survival (overall survival [OS] and progression-free survival [PFS]) in patients with relapsed/refractory large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL) treated with axi-cel. Secondary objectives included finding the association of MTV with response rates and toxicity. The MTV values on baseline positron emission tomography of 96 patients were calculated via manual methodology using commercial software. Based on a median MTV cutoff value of 147.5 mL in the first cohort (n = 48), patients were divided into high and low MTV groups. Median follow-up for survivors was 24.98 months (range, 10.59-51.02 months). Patients with low MTV had significantly superior OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.10-0.66) and PFS (HR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.18-0.89). Results were successfully validated in a second cohort of 48 patients with a median follow-up for survivors of 12.03 months (range, 0.89-25.74 months). Patients with low MTV were found to have superior OS (HR, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.05-0.42) and PFS (HR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.12-0.69). In conclusion, baseline MTV is associated with OS and PFS in axi-cel recipients with LBCL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2020001900DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7391155PMC
July 2020

Immune reconstitution and associated infections following axicabtagene ciloleucel in relapsed or refractory large B-cell lymphoma.

Haematologica 2021 04 1;106(4):978-986. Epub 2021 Apr 1.

Dept. of Blood and Marrow Transplant and Cellular Immunotherapy, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, USA.

CD19 CAR T-cell therapy with axicabtagene ciloleucel (axi-cel) for relapsed or refractory (R/R) large B cell lymphoma (LBCL) may lead to durable remissions, however, prolonged cytopenias and infections may occur. In this single center retrospective study of 85 patients, we characterized immune reconstitution and infections for patients remaining in remission after axi-cel for LBCL. Prolonged cytopenias (those occurring at or after day 30 following infusion) were common with >= grade 3 neutropenia seen in 21/70 (30-0%) patients at day 30 and persisting in 3/31 (9-7%) patients at 1 year. B cells were undetectable in 30/34 (88-2%) patients at day 30, but were detected in 11/19 (57-9%) at 1 year. Median IgG levels reached a nadir at day 180. By contrast, CD4 T cells decreased from baseline and were persistently low with a median CD4 count of 155 cells/μl at 1 year after axi-cel (n=19, range 33 - 269). In total, 23/85 (27-1%) patients received IVIG after axi-cel, and 34/85 (40-0%) received G-CSF. Infections in the first 30 days occurred in 31/85 (36-5%) patients, of which 11/85 (12-9%) required intravenous antibiotics or hospitalization ("severe") and were associated with cytokine release syndrome (CRS), neurotoxicity, tocilizumab use, corticosteroid use, and bridging therapy on univariate analyses. After day 30, 7 severe infections occurred, with no late deaths due to infection. Prolonged cytopenias are common following axi-cel therapy for LBCL and typically recover with time. Most patients experience profound and prolonged CD4 T cell immunosuppression without severe infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2019.238634DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8017820PMC
April 2021

Radiation Therapy as a Bridging Strategy for CAR T Cell Therapy With Axicabtagene Ciloleucel in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2019 12 5;105(5):1012-1021. Epub 2019 Jun 5.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida. Electronic address:

Purpose: Axicabtagene ciloleucel (axi-cel) is a CD19-directed chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy for relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Bridging therapy may be required for lymphoma control during the manufacturing interval between collection of autologous T cells and final CAR T product administration. The optimal bridging therapy is not known and patients are often chemorefractory. We present a case series of patients receiving radiation as a bridge to axi-cel.

Methods And Materials: Between December 2017 and October 2018, 12 patients were intended to receive bridging radiation before axi-cel. The group was characterized by highly aggressive disease including 6 of 12 with "double hit" lymphoma and 6 of 12 with disease ≥10 cm in diameter. All patients received 2 to 4 Gy/fraction to a median dose of 20 Gy (range, 6-36.5 Gy). Half of patients received either 30 Gy in 10 fractions or 20 Gy in 5 fractions. Seven patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Eleven patients underwent axi-cel infusion and one did not. Median follow-up was 3.3 months (range, 1.1-12.0 months).

Results: No significant toxicities were identified during bridging radiation, and no patient experienced in-field progression of disease before axi-cel infusion. One patient experienced abdominal pain, which resolved after dose reduction. Two patients had out-of-field progression of disease during the bridging period. After axi-cel infusion, 3 of 11 patients (27%) experienced severe cytokine release syndrome or neurotoxicity. At 30 days, the objective response rate was 81.8% (11 of 12 evaluable; 1 stable disease, 1 out-of-field progression), with complete response in 27% (3 of 11). At last follow-up, the best objective response rate was 81.8%, with a complete response attained in 45% (5 of 11). Lymphocyte counts decreased slightly in 10 of 12 patients during radiation (median, 0.25 k/uL).

Conclusions: Radiation (with or without concurrent chemotherapy) can be safely administered as a bridge to axi-cel in high-risk lymphoma. Caution should be taken if irradiation is started before apheresis, and lymphocyte counts should be monitored closely throughout. Future investigation is warranted to optimize the use of bridging radiation before CAR T therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2019.05.065DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6872916PMC
December 2019

Clinical utilization of Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-cells (CAR-T) in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)-an expert opinion from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) and the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT).

Bone Marrow Transplant 2019 11 15;54(11):1868-1880. Epub 2019 May 15.

Department of Haematological Medicine, King's College, London, UK.

On August 30, 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (US-FDA) approved tisagenlecleucel (KYMRIAH, Novartis, Basel, Switzerland), a synthetic bioimmune product of anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor-T cells (CAR-T), for the treatment of children and young adults with relapsed/refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). With this new era of personalized cancer immunotherapy, multiple challenges are present ranging from implementation of a CAR-T program to safe delivery of the drug, long-term toxicity monitoring and disease assessments. To address these issues, experts representing the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplant (ASBMT), the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT), the International Society of Cell and Gene Therapy (ISCT), and the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT), formed a global CAR-T task force to identify and address key questions pertinent for hematologists and transplant physicians regarding the clinical use of anti CD19 CAR-T therapy in patients with B-ALL. This article presents an initial roadmap for navigating common clinical practice scenarios that will become more prevalent now that the first commercially available CAR-T product for B-ALL has been approved.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41409-019-0451-2DOI Listing
November 2019

Progression with clinical features is associated with worse subsequent survival in multiple myeloma.

Am J Hematol 2019 04 6;94(4):439-445. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Taussig Cancer Center, Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH.

Response rate and survival in multiple myeloma (MM) has improved in the era of proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs. However, most patients eventually relapse with biochemical progression (BP) alone or with clinical features of end-organ damage (CP: clinical progression), without or without extramedullary (EM) disease. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 252 patients with MM experiencing first relapse (time, T ) to evaluate survival following CP with and without EM as a function of BP. Patients were divided into three groups: BP (n = 134; 53%), CP/EM- (n = 87; 35%) and CP/EM+ (n = 31; 12%). The median time from diagnosis to T was significantly shorter in CP/EM+ compared to CP/EM- and BP groups (13 vs 25 vs 25 months; P < 0.001). The incidence of abnormal metaphase cytogenetics at diagnosis was significantly higher in CP/EM+ compared to CP/EM- and BP groups (46% vs 18% vs 11% respectively; P < 0.001). At a median follow-up of 26 months from T , median overall survival was 50, 19 and 10 months for BP, CP/EM- and CP/EM+ groups, respectively (P < 0.001). On multivariable analysis, pattern of progression was a significant prognostic factor for OS (HR for CP/EM- vs BP: 3.6; CP/EM+ vs BP: 8.7 and CP/EM+ vs CP/EM-: 2.42; P < 0.001 for all comparisons), along with age at T . In conclusion, progression pattern is an important prognostic factor in the current era, with subsequent survival being dismal in patients with end-organ damage or EM disease at relapse. Clinical trials in relapsed MM should consider reporting patterns of progression at baseline to ensure balance between study arms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajh.25415DOI Listing
April 2019

Clinical Utilization of Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells in B Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: An Expert Opinion from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2019 03 18;25(3):e76-e85. Epub 2018 Dec 18.

Department of Haematological Medicine, King's College, London, United Kingdom.

On August 30, 2017 the US Food and Drug Administration approved tisagenlecleucel (Kymriah; Novartis, Basel, Switzerland), a synthetic bioimmune product of anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CAR-T), for the treatment of children and young adults with relapsed/refractory B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). With this new era of personalized cancer immunotherapy, multiple challenges are present, ranging from implementation of a CAR-T program to safe delivery of the drug, long-term toxicity monitoring, and disease assessments. To address these issues experts representing the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplant, the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, the International Society of Cell and Gene Therapy, and the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy formed a global CAR-T task force to identify and address key questions pertinent for hematologists and transplant physicians regarding the clinical use of anti CD19 CAR-T therapy in patients with B-ALL. This article presents an initial roadmap for navigating common clinical practice scenarios that will become more prevalent now that the first commercially available CAR-T product for B-ALL has been approved.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2018.12.068DOI Listing
March 2019

Daratumumab proves safe and highly effective in AL amyloidosis.

Br J Haematol 2019 04 25;185(2):342-344. Epub 2018 Jun 25.

Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjh.15455DOI Listing
April 2019

Music Therapy for Symptom Management After Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation: Results From a Randomized Study.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2017 Sep 19;23(9):1567-1572. Epub 2017 May 19.

Taussig Cancer Institute, Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.

High-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is frequently performed in patients with hematologic malignancies. ASCT can result in significant nausea, pain, and discomfort. Supportive care has improved, and pharmacologic therapies are frequently used, but with limitations. Music has been demonstrated to improve nausea and pain in patients undergoing chemotherapy, but little data are available regarding the effects of music therapy in the transplantation setting. In a prospective study, patients with lymphoma or multiple myeloma undergoing ASCT were randomized to receive either interactive music therapy with a board-certified music therapist or no music therapy. The music therapy arm received 2 music therapy sessions on days +1 and +5. Primary outcomes were perception of pain and nausea measured on a visual analog scale. Secondary outcomes were narcotic pain medication use from day -1 to day +5 and impact of ASCT on patient mood as assessed by Profile of Mood States (POMS) on day +5. Eighty-two patients were enrolled, with 37 in the music therapy arm and 45 in the no music therapy arm. Patients who received MT had slightly increased nausea by day +7 compared with the no music therapy patients. The music therapy and no music therapy patients had similar pain scores; however, the patients who received music therapy used significantly less narcotic pain medication (median, 24 mg versus 73 mg; P = .038). Music therapy may be a viable nonpharmacologic method of pain management for patients undergoing ASCT; the music therapy patients required significantly fewer morphine equivalent doses compared with the no music therapy patients. Additional research is needed to better understand the effects of music therapy on patient-perceived symptoms, such as pain and nausea.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2017.05.015DOI Listing
September 2017

The association of histologic grade with acute graft-versus-host disease response and outcomes.

Am J Hematol 2017 Jul 26;92(7):683-688. Epub 2017 May 26.

Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

Consensus criteria are routinely used to clinically grade acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). A histologic grading system for acute GVHD is available, but there are limited data on its correlation with clinical grade and hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes. Among 503 patients who underwent allogeneic HCT from 2005 to 2013, we identified 300 biopsy episodes of the skin and gastrointestinal (GI) tract in 231 patients. Histologic grade was correlated with clinical grade of GVHD, day 28 treatment response, and outcome. Both skin (R = 0.32) and GI (R = 0.61) histologic grade correlated with clinical grade (P < 0.001). On multivariable analysis, histologic grade (HR 0.87, P = 0.011) and clinical grade (HR 0.86, P = 0.008) were significantly associated with day 28-treatment response. A histologic grade lower than its associated clinical grade predicted for better response (HR 1.26, P = 0.027), while a histologic grade higher than associated clinical grade had no correlation with response (P = 0.89). Both clinical and histologic GVHD grade were significant predictors of non-relapse mortality (HR 1.47, P = 0.04 and HR 1.67, P = 0.002, respectively) and all-cause mortality (HR 1.57, P = 0.001 and HR 1.29, P = 0.046, respectively). Histologic GVHD grade thus is correlated with clinical grading and treatment response, and may play a role in further predicting severity and treatment response of acute GVHD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajh.24749DOI Listing
July 2017

Late acute graft-versus-host disease: a prospective analysis of clinical outcomes and circulating angiogenic factors.

Blood 2016 11 13;128(19):2350-2358. Epub 2016 Sep 13.

Blood and Marrow Transplantation Program, The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY.

Late acute (LA) graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is persistent, recurrent, or new-onset acute GVHD symptoms occurring >100 days after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The aim of this analysis is to describe the onset, course, morbidity, and mortality of and examine angiogenic factors associated with LA GVHD. A prospective cohort of patients (n = 909) was enrolled as part of an observational study within the Chronic GVHD Consortium. Eighty-three patients (11%) developed LA GVHD at a median of 160 (interquartile range, 128-204) days after HCT. Although 51 out of 83 (61%) achieved complete or partial response to initial therapy by 28 days, median failure-free survival was only 7.1 months (95% confidence interval, 3.4-19.1 months), and estimated overall survival (OS) at 2 years was 56%. Given recently described alterations of circulating angiogenic factors in classic acute GVHD, we examined whether alterations in such factors could be identified in LA GVHD. We first tested cases (n = 55) and controls (n = 50) from the Chronic GVHD Consortium and then validated the findings in 37 cases from Mount Sinai Acute GVHD International Consortium. Plasma amphiregulin (AREG; an epidermal growth factor [EGF] receptor ligand) was elevated, and an AREG/EGF ratio at or above the median was associated with inferior OS and increased nonrelapse mortality in both cohorts. Elevation of AREG was detected in classic acute GVHD, but not chronic GVHD. These prospective data characterize the clinical course of LA GVHD and demonstrate alterations in angiogenic factors that make LA GVHD biologically distinct from chronic GVHD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2015-09-669846DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5106113PMC
November 2016

The Cost of Mobilization.

Authors:
Hien D Liu

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2016 10 15;22(10):1735-1736. Epub 2016 Aug 15.

Taussig Cancer Institute, Department of Hematology/Medical Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2016.08.009DOI Listing
October 2016

Association of Socioeconomic Status with Outcomes of Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Multiple Myeloma.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2016 06 16;22(6):1141-1144. Epub 2016 Mar 16.

Blood and Marrow Transplantation Program, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio; Department of Hematology and Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. Electronic address:

Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) is standard therapy for eligible patients with multiple myeloma. Health care disparities can influence transplantation outcomes. However, the association of socioeconomic status (SES), a major indicator of health care disparities, with outcomes in patients with myeloma after AHCT has not been previously described. We analyzed 346 consecutive AHCT recipients with myeloma who underwent transplantation between 2003 and 2013 in this retrospective cohort study. Zip code of residence at the time of AHCT was obtained to assess annual household income based on 2010 US census data (median, $49,054; range, $16,546 to $127,313). SES groups were divided into < $45,000 (low; n = 120), $45,000 to $60,000 (middle; n = 116), and > $60,000 (high; n = 110). The low-income cohort had smallest portion of Caucasians (69% versus 89% versus 91%); otherwise, patient, disease, and transplantation characteristics were comparable among cohorts or different without significant patterns found. Median follow-up was 49 months. There was no difference among SES groups in overall survival, progression-free survival, nonrelapse mortality, or relapse in univariate and multivariable analysis. Similarly, SES was not associated with survival in a subset analysis of 303 patients who had survived for 1 year after transplantation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2016.03.011DOI Listing
June 2016