Publications by authors named "Hiba Ezzeddine"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Opioids After Surgery in the United States Versus the Rest of the World: The International Patterns of Opioid Prescribing (iPOP) Multicenter Study.

Ann Surg 2020 12;272(6):879-886

Division of Acute Care and Ambulatory Surgery, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Objective: The International Patterns of Opioid Prescribing study compares postoperative opioid prescribing patterns in the United States (US) versus the rest of the world.

Summary Of Background Data: The US is in the middle of an unprecedented opioid epidemic. Diversion of unused opioids contributes to the opioid epidemic.

Methods: Patients ≥16 years old undergoing appendectomy, cholecystectomy, or inguinal hernia repair in 14 hospitals from 8 countries during a 6-month period were included. Medical records were systematically reviewed to identify: (1) preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative characteristics, (2) opioid intake within 3 months preoperatively, (3) opioid prescription upon discharge, and (4) opioid refills within 3 months postoperatively. The median/range and mean/standard deviation of number of pills and OME were compared between the US and non-US patients.

Results: A total of 4690 patients were included. The mean age was 49 years, 47% were female, and 4% had opioid use history. Ninety-one percent of US patients were prescribed opioids, compared to 5% of non-US patients (P < 0.001). The median number of opioid pills and OME prescribed were 20 (0-135) and 150 (0-1680) mg for US versus 0 (0-50) and 0 (0-600) mg for non-US patients, respectively (both P < 0.001). The mean number of opioid pills and OME prescribed were 23.1 ± 13.9 in US and 183.5 ± 133.7 mg versus 0.8 ± 3.9 and 4.6 ± 27.7 mg in non-US patients, respectively (both P < 0.001). Opioid refill rates were 4.7% for US and 1.0% non-US patients (P < 0.001).

Conclusions: US physicians prescribe alarmingly high amounts of opioid medications postoperatively. Further efforts should focus on limiting opioid prescribing and emphasize non-opioid alternatives in the US.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SLA.0000000000004225DOI Listing
December 2020

Prolonged operating room time in emergency general surgery is associated with venous thromboembolic complications.

Am J Surg 2019 11 6;218(5):836-841. Epub 2019 May 6.

Department of Surgery, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA.

Background: We evaluated the association between operating room time and developing a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolus (PE) after emergency general surgery (EGS).

Methods: We reviewed six common EGS procedures in the 2013-2015 NSQIP dataset. After tabulating their incidence of postoperative VTE events, we calculated predictors of developing a VTE using adjusted multivariate logistic regressions.

Results: Of 108,954 EGS patients, 1,366 patients (1.3%) developed a VTE postoperatively. The median time to diagnosis was 9 days [5-16] for DVTs and 8 days [5-16] for PEs. Operating room time of 100 min or more was associated with increased risk of developing a DVT (OR 1.30 [1.12-2.21]) and PE (OR:1.25 [1.11-2.43]) with a 7% and 5% respective increase for every 10 min increase after the 100 min. Other independent predictors of VTE complications were older age, and history of cancer, and emergent colectomies on procedure-level analysis.

Conclusion: Prolonged operating room time is independently associated with increased risk of developing VTE complications after an EGS procedure. Most of the VTE complications were delayed in presentation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2019.04.022DOI Listing
November 2019

Unplanned readmission after traumatic injury: A long-term nationwide analysis.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2019 Jul;87(1):188-194

From the School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University (N.L., S.V.), Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Surgery (A.M.), New York-Presbyterian Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; Department of Surgery (H.E., A.K., J.K.C., D.T.E., J.V.S.), Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Surgery (R.D.W.), Kentucky University Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky; Department of Surgery (A.B.N.), University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; and Department of Surgery, University of Arizona College of Medicine (B.A.J.), Tucson, Arizona.

Background: Long-term outcomes after trauma admissions remain understudied. We analyzed the characteristics of inpatient readmissions within 6 months of an index hospitalization for traumatic injury.

Methods: Using the 2010 to 2015 Nationwide Readmissions Database, which captures data from up to 27 US states, we identified patients at least 15 years old admitted to a hospital through an emergency department for blunt trauma, penetrating trauma, or burns. Exclusion criteria included hospital transfers, patients who died during their index hospitalizations, and hospitals with fewer than 100 trauma patients annually. After calculating the incidences of all-cause, unplanned inpatient readmissions within 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months, we used multivariable logistic regression models to identify predictors of readmissions. Analyses adjusted for patient, clinical, and hospital factors.

Results: Among 2,763,890 trauma patients, the majority had blunt injuries (92.5%), followed by penetrating injuries (6.2%) and burns (1.5%). Overall, rates of inpatient readmissions were 11.1% within 1 month, 21.6% within 6 months, and 29.8% within 6 months, with limited variability by year. After adjustment, the following were associated with all-cause 6 months inpatient readmissions: male sex (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.10; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.09-1.10), comorbidities (aOR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.21-1.22), low-income quartiles (first and second) (aOR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.07-1.10 and aOR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.03-1.06, respectively), Medicare (aOR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.62-1.69), Medicaid (aOR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.48-1.53), being treated at private, investor-owned hospitals (aOR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.12-1.18), longer hospital length of stay (aOR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.01-1.01) and patient disposition to short-term hospital (aOR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.49-1.62), skilled nursing facility (aOR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.42-1.45), home health care (aOR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.25-1.28), or leaving against medical advice (aOR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.78-1.92).

Conclusion: Unplanned readmission after trauma is high and remains this way 6 months after discharge. Understanding the factors that increase the odds of readmissions within 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months offer a focus for quality improvement and have important implications for hospital benchmarking.

Level Of Evidence: Epidemiological study, level III.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000002339DOI Listing
July 2019

Recurring emergency general surgery: Characterizing a vulnerable population.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2019 03;86(3):464-470

From the School of Medicine (N.L.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Surgery (A.M.), NewYork-Presbyterian Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; Department of Surgery (H.E., J.K.C., D.T.E., J.V.S.), Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Surgery (M.H., F.J., B.A.J.), University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, Arizona; Department of Surgery (A.B.N.), University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; and Department of Surgery (J.D.J.), R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Maryland.

Background: Limited data exist for long-term outcomes after emergency general surgeries (EGSs) in the United States. This study aimed to characterize the incidence of inpatient readmissions and additional operations within 6 months of an EGS procedure.

Methods: In this retrospective observational study, we identified adults (≥18 years old) undergoing one of seven common EGS procedures (appendectomies, cholecystectomies, small bowel resections, large bowel resections, control of gastrointestinal [GI] ulcers and bleeding, peritoneal adhesiolysis, and exploratory laparotomies) who were discharged alive in the 2010-2015 National Readmissions Database. Outcomes included the rates of all-cause inpatient readmissions and of undergoing a second EGS procedure, both within 6 months. Multivariable logistic regression models identified risk factors of reoperation, adjusting for patient, clinical, and hospital factors.

Results: Of 706,678 patients undergoing an EGS procedure 131,291 (18.6%) had an inpatient readmission within 6 months. Among those readmitted, 15,178 (11.6%) underwent a second EGS procedure, occurring at a median of 45 days (interquartile range, 15-95). After adjustment, notable predictors of reoperation included male sex (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.06 [95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.10]); private, nonprofit hospitals (aOR, 1.09 [1.02-1.17]); private, investor-owned hospitals (aOR, 1.09 [1.00-1.85]); discharge to short-term hospital (aOR, 1.35 [1.04-1.74]); discharge with home health care (aOR, 1.19 [1.13-1.25]); and index procedure of control of GI ulcer and bleeding (aOR, 9.38 [8.75-10.05]), laparotomy (aOR, 7.62 [6.92-8.40]), or large bowel resection (aOR, 6.94 [6.44-7.47]).

Conclusion: One fifth of patients undergoing an EGS procedure had an inpatient readmission within 6 months, where one in nine of those underwent a second EGS procedure. As half of all second EGS procedures occurred within 6 weeks of the index procedure, identifying patients with the highest health care needs (index procedure type and discharge needs) may identify patients at risk for subsequent reoperation in nonemergency settings.

Level Of Evidence: Epidemiological, level III.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000002151DOI Listing
March 2019

Life Threatening Complications Post-Liposuction.

Aesthetic Plast Surg 2018 Apr 31;42(2):384-387. Epub 2018 Jan 31.

Department of General Surgery, Liver Transplantation and Hepatopancreaticobiliary Unit, American University of Beirut Medical center, Beirut, Lebanon.

Background: Liposuction is one of the most commonly performed aesthetic procedures. It is performed worldwide as an outpatient procedure. However, the complications are underestimated and underreported by caregivers. We present a case of delayed diagnosis of bilothorax secondary to liver and gallbladder injury after tumescent liposuction.

Methods: A 26-year-old female patient was transferred to our emergency department from an aesthetic clinic with worsening dyspnea, tachypnea and fatigue. She had undergone extensive liposuction of the thighs, buttocks, back and abdomen 5 days prior to presentation.

Results: A chest X-ray showed significant right-sided pleural effusion. Thoracentesis was performed and drained bilious fluid. CT scan of the abdomen revealed pleural, liver and gall bladder injury. An exploratory laparoscopy confirmed the findings, the collections were drained; cholecystectomy and intraoperative cholangiogram were performed. The patient did very well postoperatively and was discharged home in 2 days.

Conclusion: Even though liposuction is considered a simple office-based procedure, its complications can be fatal. The lack of strict laws that exclusively place this procedure in the hands of medical professionals allow these procedures to still be done by less experienced hands and in outpatient-based settings. Our case serves to highlight yet another unique but potentially fatal complication of liposuction.

Level Of Evidence V: This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00266-017-1058-xDOI Listing
April 2018
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