Publications by authors named "Henrik Benoni"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Relative and absolute cancer risks among Nordic kidney transplant recipients-a population-based study.

Transpl Int 2020 12 25;33(12):1700-1710. Epub 2020 Sep 25.

Clinical Epidemiology Division, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) have an increased cancer risk compared to the general population, but absolute risks that better reflect the clinical impact of cancer are seldom estimated. All KTRs in Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and Finland, with a first transplantation between 1995 and 2011, were identified through national registries. Post-transplantation cancer occurrence was assessed through linkage with cancer registries. We estimated standardized incidence ratios (SIR), absolute excess risks (AER), and cumulative incidence of cancer in the presence of competing risks. Overall, 12 984 KTRs developed 2215 cancers. The incidence rate of cancer overall was threefold increased (SIR 3.3, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.2-3.4). The AER of any cancer was 1560 cases (95% CI: 1468-1656) per 100 000 person-years. The highest AERs were observed for nonmelanoma skin cancer (838, 95% CI: 778-901), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (145, 95% CI: 119-174), lung cancer (126, 95% CI: 98.2-149), and kidney cancer (122, 95% CI: 98.0-149). The five- and ten-year cumulative incidence of any cancer was 8.1% (95% CI: 7.6-8.6%) and 16.8% (95% CI: 16.0-17.6%), respectively. Excess cancer risks were observed among Nordic KTRs for a wide range of cancers. Overall, 1 in 6 patients developed cancer within ten years, supporting extensive post-transplantation cancer vigilance.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tri.13734DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7756726PMC
December 2020

Author's reply to: A note on competing risks in analyses of cancer-specific mortality.

Int J Cancer 2019 09 28;145(6):1706-1707. Epub 2019 Jun 28.

Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.32517DOI Listing
September 2019

Survival among solid organ transplant recipients diagnosed with cancer compared to nontransplanted cancer patients-A nationwide study.

Int J Cancer 2020 02 11;146(3):682-691. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Solid organ transplant recipients (OTRs) have an increased cancer risk but their survival once diagnosed with cancer has seldom been assessed. We therefore investigated cancer-specific survival among OTRs with a wide range of cancer forms nationally in Sweden. The study included 2,143 OTRs with cancer, and 946,089 nontransplanted cancer patients diagnosed 1992-2013. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cox regression models adjusted for age, sex and calendar year. Median follow-up was 3.1 (range 0-22) years. Overall, OTRs diagnosed with any cancer had a 35% higher rate of cancer death compared to nontransplanted cancer patients (HR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.24-1.47). Specifically, higher rates of cancer-specific death were observed among OTRs diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma (HR: 15.0, 95% CI: 5.56-40.6), high-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma (HR: 2.68, 95% CI: 1.90-3.77), malignant melanoma (HR: 2.80, 95% CI: 1.74-4.52) and urothelial (HR: 2.56, 95% CI: 1.65-3.97), breast (HR: 2.12, 95% CI: 1.38-3.25), head/neck (HR: 1.55, 95% CI: 1.02-2.36) and colorectal (HR: 1.42, 95% CI: 1.07-1.88) cancer. The worse outcomes were not explained by differences in distribution of cancer stage or histologic subtypes. For other common cancer forms such as prostate, lung and kidney cancer, the prognosis was similar to that in nontransplanted cancer patients. In conclusion, several but not all types of posttransplantation cancer diagnoses are associated with worse outcomes than in the general population. Reasons for this should be further explored to optimize posttransplantation cancer management.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.32299DOI Listing
February 2020
-->