Publications by authors named "Henderikus G Otten"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A Single Nucleotide C3 Polymorphism Associates With Clinical Outcome After Lung Transplantation.

Front Immunol 2019 26;10:2245. Epub 2019 Sep 26.

Center for Translational Immunology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.

Development of chronic rejection is still a severe problem and causes high mortality rates after lung transplantation (LTx). Complement activation is important in the development of acute rejection (AR) and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, with C3 as a key complement factor. We investigated a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the C3 gene (rs2230199) in relation to long-term outcome after LTx in 144 patient-donor pairs. In addition, we looked at local production of donor C3 by analyzing bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of 6 LTx patients using isoelectric focusing (IEF). We demonstrated the presence of C3 in BALF and showed that this is produced by the donor lung based on the genotype of SNP rs2230199. We also analyzed donor and patient SNP configurations and observed a significant association between the SNP configuration in patients and episodes of AR during 4-years follow-up. Survival analysis showed a lower AR-free survival in homozygous C3 slow patients ( = 0.005). Furthermore, we found a significant association between the SNP configuration in donors and BOS development. Patients receiving a graft from a donor with at least one C3 fast variant for rs2230199 had an inferior BOS-free survival ( = 0.044). In conclusion, our data indicate local C3 production by donor lung cells. In addition, a single C3 SNP present in recipients affects short-term outcome after LTx, while this SNP in donors has an opposite effect on long-term outcome after LTx. These results could contribute to an improved risk stratification after transplantation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2019.02245DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6775212PMC
October 2020

The Autoimmune-Associated Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Within Correlates With Clinical Outcome After Lung Transplantation.

Front Immunol 2018 17;9:3105. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Laboratory of Translational Immunology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.

Obstructive chronic lung allograft dysfunction (BOS) is the major limiting factor for lung transplantation (LTx) outcome. is described as the hallmark autoimmunity gene, and one specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs2476601, is associated with multiple autoimmune diseases, impaired T cell regulation, and autoantibody formation. Taking into consideration the contribution of autoimmunity to LTx outcome, we hypothesized that polymorphisms in the gene could be associated with BOS incidence. We selected six SNPs within and analyzed both patient and donor genotypes on BOS development post-LTx. A total of 144 patients and matched donors were included, and individual SNPs and haplotype configurations were analyzed. We found a significant association between patients carrying the heterozygous configuration of rs2476601 and a higher risk for BOS development ( = 0.005, OR: 4.400, 95%CI: 1.563-12.390). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that heterozygous patients exhibit a lower BOS-free survival compared to patients homozygous for rs2476601 ( = 0.0047). One haplotype, which solely contained the heterozygous risk variant, was associated with BOS development ( = 0.015, OR: 7.029, 95%CI: 1.352-36.543). Our results show that LTx patients heterozygous for rs2476601 are more susceptible for BOS development and indicate a deleterious effect of the autoimmune-related risk factor of in patients on LTx outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2018.03105DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6344400PMC
October 2019

Effect of initial immunosuppression on long-term kidney transplant outcome in immunological low-risk patients.

Nephrol Dial Transplant 2019 08;34(8):1417-1422

Department of Immunogenetics, Sanquin, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: Few studies have evaluated the effect of different immunosuppressive strategies on long-term kidney transplant outcomes. Moreover, as they were usually based on historical data, it was not possible to account for the presence of pretransplant donor-specific human-leukocyte antigen antibodies (DSA), a currently recognized risk marker for impaired graft survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate to what extent frequently used initial immunosuppressive therapies increase graft survival in immunological low-risk patients.

Methods: We performed an analysis on the PROCARE cohort, a Dutch multicentre study including all transplantations performed in the Netherlands between 1995 and 2005 with available pretransplant serum (n = 4724). All sera were assessed for the presence of DSA by a luminex single-antigen bead assay. Patients with a previous kidney transplantation, pretransplant DSA or receiving induction therapy were excluded from the analysis.

Results: Three regimes were used in over 200 patients: cyclosporine (CsA)/prednisolone (Pred) (n = 542), CsA/mycophenolate mofetil (MMF)/Pred (n = 857) and tacrolimus (TAC)/MMF/Pred (n = 811). Covariate-adjusted analysis revealed no significant differences in 10-year death-censored graft survival between patients on TAC/MMF/Pred therapy (79%) compared with patients on CsA/MMF/Pred (82%, P = 0.88) or CsA/Pred (79%, P = 0.21). However, 1-year rejection-free survival censored for death and failure unrelated to rejection was significantly higher for TAC/MMF/Pred (81%) when compared with CsA/MMF/Pred (67%, P < 0.0001) and CsA/Pred (64%, P < 0.0001).

Conclusion: These results suggest that in immunological low-risk patients excellent long-term kidney graft survival can be achieved irrespective of the type of initial immunosuppressive therapy (CsA or TAC; with or without MMF), despite differences in 1-year rejection-free survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfy377DOI Listing
August 2019

A paired kidney analysis on the impact of pre-transplant anti-HLA antibodies on graft survival.

Nephrol Dial Transplant 2019 06;34(6):1056-1063

Department of Immunogenetics, Sanquin, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: Pre-transplant donor-specific anti-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies (DSAs) are associated with impaired kidney graft survival while the clinical relevance of non-donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (nDSAs) is more controversial. The aim of the present paired kidney graft study was to compare the clinical relevance of DSAs and nDSAs.

Methods: To eliminate donor and era-dependent factors, a post hoc paired kidney graft analysis was performed as part of a Dutch multicentre study evaluating all transplantations between 1995 and 2005 with available pre-transplant serum samples. Anti-HLA antibodies were detected with a Luminex single-antigen bead assay.

Results: Among 3237 deceased donor transplantations, we identified 115 recipient pairs receiving a kidney from the same donor with one recipient being DSA positive and the other without anti-HLA antibodies. Patients with pre-transplant DSAs had a significantly lower 10-year death-censored graft survival (55% versus 82%, P=0.0001). We identified 192 pairs with one recipient as nDSA positive (against Class I and/or II) and the other without anti-HLA antibodies. For the patients with nDSAs against either Class I or II, graft survival did not significantly differ compared with patients without anti-HLA antibodies (74% versus 77%, P = 0.79). Only in patients with both nDSAs Class I and II was there a trend towards a lower graft survival (58%, P = 0.06). Lastly, in a small group of 42 recipient pairs, 10-year graft survival in recipients with DSAs was 49% compared with 68% in recipients with nDSAs (P=0.11).

Conclusion: This paired kidney analysis confirms that the presence of pre-transplant DSAs in deceased donor transplantations is a risk marker for graft loss, whereas nDSAs in general are not associated with a lower graft survival. Subgroup analysis indicated that only in broadly sensitized patients with nDSAs against Class I and II, nDSAs may be a risk marker for graft loss in the long term.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfy316DOI Listing
June 2019

Association between a Single Donor Promotor Polymorphism and Obstructive Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction after Lung Transplantation.

Front Immunol 2017 6;8:1109. Epub 2017 Sep 6.

Laboratory of Translational Immunology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.

Lung transplantation (LTx) outcome is hampered by development of chronic rejection, often manifested as the bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). Low serum levels of thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17), a chemoattractant, measured during the first month post-LTx are predictive for BOS development. Since promotor polymorphisms correlate with serum TARC/CCL17 levels, we investigated seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within this region and their potential association with LTx outcome. We analyzed donor and patient SNP configurations and haplotypes and observed a trend between a donor SNP (rs223899) configuration and patient TARC/CCL17 serum levels post-LTx ( = 0.066). Interestingly, this SNP configuration in patients did not show any correlation with pre-LTx TARC/CCL17 serum levels ( = 0.776). Survival analysis showed that receiving a graft from a donor heterozygous for rs223899 has a disadvantageous impact on transplantation outcome. When stratified per donor SNP genotype, patients receiving a transplant from a heterozygous donor showed a lower BOS-free survival ( = 0.023) and survival rate ( = 0.0079). Since rs223899 is located within a NFκB binding site, heterozygosity at this position could result in a reduced TARC/CCL17 expression. Our data indicate that a single promotor SNP in the donor correlates with lower serum TARC/CCL17 levels measured 1 month after LTx and affects clinical outcome after LTx.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2017.01109DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5592199PMC
September 2017

Soluble CD59 is a Novel Biomarker for the Prediction of Obstructive Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction After Lung Transplantation.

Sci Rep 2016 05 24;6:26274. Epub 2016 May 24.

Laboratory of Translational Immunology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

CD59 is a complement regulatory protein that inhibits membrane attack complex formation. A soluble form of CD59 (sCD59) is present in various body fluids and is associated with cellular damage after acute myocardial infarction. Lung transplantation (LTx) is the final treatment for end-stage lung diseases, however overall survival is hampered by chronic lung allograft dysfunction development, which presents itself obstructively as the bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). We hypothesized that, due to cellular damage and activation during chronic inflammation, sCD59 serum levels can be used as biomarker preceding BOS development. We analyzed sCD59 serum concentrations in 90 LTx patients, of whom 20 developed BOS. We observed that BOS patients exhibited higher sCD59 serum concentrations at the time of diagnosis compared to clinically matched non-BOS patients (p = 0.018). Furthermore, sCD59 titers were elevated at 6 months post-LTx (p = 0.0020), when patients had no BOS-related symptoms. Survival-analysis showed that LTx patients with sCD59 titers ≥400 pg/ml 6 months post-LTx have a significant (p < 0.0001) lower chance of BOS-free survival than patients with titers ≤400 pg/ml, 32% vs. 80% respectively, which was confirmed by multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 6.2, p < 0.0001). We propose that circulating sCD59 levels constitute a novel biomarker to identify patients at risk for BOS following LTx.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep26274DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4877647PMC
May 2016

Profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells does not accurately predict the bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome after lung transplantation.

Transpl Immunol 2015 Jun 2;32(3):195-200. Epub 2015 Apr 2.

Laboratory of Translational Immunology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

After lung transplantation (LTx), circulating mononuclear cell composition and their subsets may be predictive for the bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). We investigated the cellular composition in patients developing BOS, or not, by analyzing peripheral blood taken at multiple time points after transplantation. PBMCs of 11 BOS and 39 non-BOS patients were analyzed by FACS for monocytes, dendritic cells, NK-, NKT-, B- and T cells as well as B- and T cell subsets. Analysis of blood samples taken monthly during the first year post-LTx showed that circulating NK, NKT and dendritic cell percentages were not indicative of BOS development, whereas increases in T cells, monocytes and lowered fractions of B cells were related to BOS development. B- and T cell subset analysis at month 5 post-LTx indicated that IgM+IgD- memory B cells and central memory CD8+ T cells were decreased, whereas NKT cells were increased in BOS patients compared to non-BOS patients. Prior to BOS diagnosis, the composition of specific mononuclear cells on a group level differs from patients remaining BOS free. However, given the overlap in percentages of cellular frequencies between the patient groups investigated, this analysis does not allow prediction or risk stratification for development of BOS in individual patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.trim.2015.03.003DOI Listing
June 2015

Clinical similarities among bradykinin-mediated and mast cell-mediated subtypes of non-hereditary angioedema: a retrospective study.

Clin Transl Allergy 2015 4;5(1). Epub 2015 Feb 4.

Department of Dermatology and Allergology, University Medical Center Utrecht (G02.124), PO Box 85.500, Utrecht, 3508 GA The Netherlands.

Background: Non-hereditary angioedema (non-HAE) is characterized by local swelling due to self-limiting, subcutaneous or submucosal extravasation of fluid, and can be divided into three subtypes. These subtypes are believed to have different pathophysiological backgrounds and are referred to in recent guidelines as bradykinin-mediated (e.g. caused by angiotensin-converting-enzyme-inhibitors), mast cell-mediated (e.g. angioedema with wheals) or idiopathic (cause unknown). Bradykinin-mediated subtypes are more closely related to hereditary angioedema than the other forms. Because clinical features of these non-HAE subtypes have not been studied in detail, we have looked at the clinical characteristics of symptoms and potential differences in clinical presentation of bradykinin-mediated and mast cell-mediated angioedema (AE) subtypes.

Methods: A questionnaire was sent to patients presenting with AE at our tertiary outpatient clinic to document clinical characteristics, potential triggers and location of AE. The severity of AE attacks was analysed using visual analogue scales (VAS).

Results: The questionnaire was returned by 106 patients, of which 104 were included in the analysis. AE with wheals, idiopathic AE, and drug-associated AE occurred in 64 (62%), 25 (24%) and 15 patients (14%) respectively. Most patients (62%) reported prodromal symptoms while 63% reported multiple locations for an attack. Face and oropharynx were the main locations of AE attacks of any subtype while swelling was the symptom most frequently reported as severe. Overall severity of the last attack was indicated as severe by 68% of the patients. There were no differences between the subgroups.

Conclusion: This similarity in clinical presentation raises the possibility that ACEi-induced, mast cell-mediated and idiopathic AE share common pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13601-015-0049-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4320604PMC
February 2015

Pre-kidney-transplant blood transfusions do not improve transplantation outcome: a Dutch national study.

Nephrol Dial Transplant 2009 Aug 27;24(8):2559-66. Epub 2009 May 27.

Department of Nephrology, University Medical Center Radboud, Postbus 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Background: Female renal transplant candidates are prone to be sensitized by prior pregnancies, and undetected historical sensitization might decrease transplantation outcome. Hypothesis of our study was that pre-transplant blood transfusions (PTFs) can elucidate historical sensitization and that the avoidance of the associated antigens can improve transplantation outcome.

Methods: Data from all female non-immunized renal transplant candidates who received a random PTF (rPTF) (n = 620), matched PTF (mPTF) (one HLA-A and B and one HLA-DR match) (n = 86) or donor-specific blood transfusion (DST) (n = 100) between 1996 and 2006 were collected. Complement-dependent cytoxicity was used to detect anti-HLA antibodies. Sensitization and transplantation outcomes after a PTF were analyzed. Non-immunized female renal transplant recipients who did not receive a PTF were used as the control group.

Results: In 165 patients, anti-HLA antibodies (IgG) were detected after the PTF. Both historical and primary sensitizations were found. A DST induced donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies in 25% of the DST recipients. Our policy did not improve transplantation outcome in recipients of a kidney from a deceased donor (n = 368) or in recipients of a living donor [DST (n = 49) and mPTF (n = 66)].

Conclusions: A PTF did elucidate historical sensitization but induce primary sensitization as well. No beneficial effect of PTFs on transplantation outcome was found, and PTFs with the intention to detect historical sensitization are therefore not suggested.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfp233DOI Listing
August 2009

Identification of non-HLA target antigens recognized after lung transplantation.

J Heart Lung Transplant 2006 Dec;25(12):1425-30

Department of Immunology, University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background: It has become evident that, besides cellular allogeneic immune responses against airway epithelial cells (AEC), humoral responses also contribute significantly to the pathogenesis of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) after lung transplantation (LTx). Antibody responses against transplanted lungs are directed against HLA and non-HLA antigens, but the identity of the latter antigens is presently unknown.

Methods: The main purpose of this study is to identify non-HLA target antigens on donor lungs recognized by patients' antibodies after LTx. Serum samples were taken before and 6 months after lung transplantation from 11 patients (4 men and 6 women, median age 44 years, range 18 to 63 years). Protein expression libraries were made from the luminal side containing AEC of discarded the donor bronchus, which was snap frozen in liquid N(2) during the organ harvesting procedure. Subsequently, all sera were analyzed for reactivity against library-encoded antigens by serologic analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries (SEREX). Recognized gene products were sequenced and analyzed by the NCBI/BLAST server.

Results: From a total of +/-3 x 10(4) gene products analyzed, six different non-HLA antigens were recognized by individual patient sera. Gene analysis indicated that they consisted of both polymorphic (PSMC4, F3, LOC284058, PLUNC, ZNF33A) and non-polymorphic (XP_931864) antigens. Cross-sectional analysis indicated that some antigens were recognized by 4 of 10 patient sera tested.

Conclusions: Antibodies directed against non-HLA antigens are present after LTx, and can be identified using the SEREX technique. Identification of target antigens recognized after LTx will improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of BOS. Monitoring of the antibody response may be used to predict BOS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.healun.2006.09.022DOI Listing
December 2006

Preclinical evaluation of anti-CD86 immunotoxin in rhesus monkeys: analysis of systemic toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and effect on primary T-cell responses.

Cancer Immunol Immunother 2003 Sep;52(9):569-75

Department of Haematology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, F03722, 3584 CX Utrecht, The Netherlands.

CD86 and CD80 costimulatory antigens are highly overexpressed on Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells in patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) and are candidate target antigens for immunotoxins in order to eliminate minimal residual disease. In this study we have evaluated the pharmacokinetics (and immunological) toxicity in rhesus monkeys of immunotoxins consisting of gelonin conjugated to anti-CD86 (alphaCD86-IT). Both alphaCD86-IT and alphaCD80-IT inhibited protein synthesis in B cell lines from rhesus monkeys and inhibited the mixed leukocyte reaction. Reactivity of the alphaCD86 antibody with rhesus monkey CD86 (RhCD86) was shown by cloning and transfecting RhCD86, which conferred reactivity of the alphaCD86 antibody used in this study. alphaCD86-IT was administered as single intravenous bolus injection in four rhesus monkeys, and achieved plasma concentration in 50-fold excess able to eliminate cultured Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells up to 6 h. The animals were capable of generating primary immune responses to both gelonin and murine IgG within 9 days after infusion with alphaCD86-IT. No evidence could be found of significant (immunological) toxicity. The results of this study show that alphaCD86-IT can be applied safely in an effective dose.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00262-003-0401-zDOI Listing
September 2003
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