Publications by authors named "Hemali Gunt"

10 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Nature-based botanical facial oil oxidative stress protection.

J Cosmet Dermatol 2021 Feb 21;20(2):522-525. Epub 2020 Dec 21.

Chapel Hill Dermatology, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

Introduction: UV-induced oxidative skin stress leads to cutaneous photoaging. The objective of these 2 studies was to evaluate a nature-based botanical facial oil for the ability to decrease UV-induced oxidative skin stress.

Methods: 22 females were enrolled in the UVA study, and 10 females were enrolled in the UVB study. Skin chemiluminescence induced by UVA exposure was measured at baseline and after 2 weeks of daily topical application of the nature-based facial oil was evaluated in study 1. In study 2, UVB-induced erythema was measured after 8 weeks of twice-daily topical application of the nature-based facial oil to a photoprotected site followed by skin biopsy to evaluate sunburn cell formation. In both studies, the treatment response was compared to the response on untreated skin.

Results: The nature-based facial oil significantly reduced skin chemiluminescence following UVA exposure, demonstrating antioxidant activity. The nature-based facial oil also significantly reduced erythema formation following UVB exposure and resulted in reduced sunburn cell formation in 66.67% of subjects.

Conclusion: Topical nature-based facial oil can reduce UV-induced oxidative cutaneous damage.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocd.13879DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7953896PMC
February 2021

Clinical Evaluation of a Nature-Based Bakuchiol Anti-Aging Moisturizer for Sensitive Skin.

J Drugs Dermatol 2020 12;19(12):1181-1183

Background: Patients with sensitive skin find topical retinoid use for anti-aging purposes challenging due to irritation. Bakuchiol, a meroterpene from the Psoralea corylifolia seed, has retinol functionality through retinol-like regulation of gene expression.

Objective: This research examined the tolerability, efficacy, and barrier effects of a nature-based bakuchiol-containing cleanser and moisturizer in subjects with sensitive skin.

Methods: 60 female subjects Fitzpatrick skin types I–V age 40–65 years with sensitive mild to moderate photodamaged skin were enrolled in this 4 week study. A sensitive skin panel was constructed: 1/3 eczema/atopic dermatitis, 1/3 rosacea, 1/3 cosmetic intolerance syndrome. Subjects used a nature-based cleanser and moisturizer twice daily and underwent transepidermal water loss (TEWL), corneometry, tolerability assessments, and efficacy assessments at baseline, 5–10 minutes post-application, and week 4.

Results: The skin care products were well tolerated and efficacious (P<0.001) in terms of investigator assessed improvement in visual smoothness, tactile smoothness, clarity, radiance, overall appearance, and global anti-aging. Cheek corneometry measurements demonstrated a statistically significant 16% increase in skin moisture content (P<0.001).

Conclusion: A bakuchiol nature-based anti-aging moisturizer is well tolerated and effective in individuals with sensitive skin.J Drugs Dermatol. 2020;19(12): doi:10.36849/JDD.2020.5522.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.36849/JDD.2020.5522DOI Listing
December 2020

Characterization and validation of an in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy led tri-method approach in the evaluation of the lip barrier.

Skin Res Technol 2020 May 9;26(3):390-397. Epub 2019 Dec 9.

proDERM Institute of Applied Dermatological Research GmbH, Hamburg, Germany.

Background/aim: It was the aim to establish and validate in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy for characterization of the lip barrier in conjunction with transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and skin capacitance assessments. For the first time in vivo, barrier-relevant components of the lip (derived, natural moisturizing factors (NMFs) and ceramides are described.

Methods: In 32 healthy volunteers, a dental tongue fixation device was inserted to prevent both voluntary and involuntary lip moisturization during measurements. Seventeen individual parameters relating to water, ceramide, and NMF content were assessed via Raman spectroscopy. Additionally, corneometry and TEWL were measured. To give a guidance for the required volunteer group size of future lip barrier studies for all test parameters, coefficients of variation (CV) were calculated and plots showing the required sample size for a given percentage treatment effect.

Results: Raman spectroscopy assessed parameters on the lower lip comprehensively characterized the state of the lip barrier. Parameter variability was sufficiently low to corroborate changes in most parameters using relatively small study populations.

Conclusions: Lip skin is comparatively well hydrated. Biophysical measurement of the lip barrier function is a challenge, as unconscious licking of the lower lip has to be prevented. In vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy provides insightful parameters for the characterization of the lip barrier and sufficiently low inter-individual variability to assess relatively small parameter changes employing relatively few study subjects. Differences at the molecular level and at a high spatial resolution are detectable, and these insights might provide a breakthrough in the evaluation of lip barrier function and developing solutions for lip care.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/srt.12814DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7317720PMC
May 2020

Natural Skin Care Products as Adjunctive to Prescription Therapy in Moderate to Severe Rosacea

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 02;18(2):141-146

Background: Rosacea is characterized by irritation associated with erythema, telangiectasias and papules/pustules. Whole formula nature-based sensitive skin products are formulated to maintain skin barrier and appropriate hydration that can lead to soothing benefits. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a regimen consisting of a cleanser containing natural oils, beeswax, and witch hazel and day and night creams containing natural oils, glycerin, and botanical anti-inflammatories (NR); and a synthetic dermatologist-recommended regimen of cetyl alcohol, sodium lauryl sulphate-containing cleanser, and glycerin, polyisobutene-containing lotion (CR) in subjects with rosacea. Methods: 80 female subjects with rosacea who received 6 weeks of 0.75% metronidazole gel, were randomized to receive NR or CR, twice daily, for 4 weeks in conjunction with the gel. Blinded investigator global assessment of rosacea, investigator-rated, and subject-rated overall skin appearance was assessed using a 5-point scale (0=none, 4=severe) at baseline, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks. Noninvasive skin assessments for skin hydration and skin barrier function were made by corneometry and TEWL, respectively. Results: NR resulted in improvement in investigator global assessment of rosacea measures at 4 weeks from baseline (erythema, 28%; telangiectasia, 26%; papules/pustules, 34%: P<0.001) and CR resulted in a 8 to 12% improvement. Differences between treatments were statistically significant. Overall skin appearance measured by the investigator was clinically and statistically improved from baseline by 32% and 12% with NR and CR, respectively. Overall skin appearance measured by subjects was improved by both NR and CR from baseline with no differences between treatments. Both regimens improved barrier function from baseline to week 4 (13%, NR; 14%, CR). NR decreased hydration by 21% from baseline at week 4 while CR increased hydration by 14% (P<0.001 from NR). No clinically significant tolerability issues were reported in either regimen at week 4. Conclusion: NR was effective, well tolerated, and superior to CR in the management of rosacea, concomitantly treated with metronidazole. National Clinical Trial Identifier: NCT03392558 J Drugs Dermatol. 2019;18(2):141-146.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 2019

Evaluation of the Performance of a Nature-Based Sensitive Skin Regimen in Subjects With Clinically Diagnosed Sensitive Skin.

J Drugs Dermatol 2018 Aug;17(8):908-913

Background: Unique whole formula nature-based sensitive skin products are formulated to minimize irritation while providing conditioning and soothing benefits to clinically diagnosed sensitive skin.

Objective: To evaluate and compare the efficacy and tolerability of a regimen of cleanser containing natural oils, beeswax, and witch hazel, and day & night creams containing natural oils, glycerin, and botanical anti-inflammatories (NR); and a synthetic dermatologist-recommended regimen of cetyl alcohol, sodium lauryl sulphate-containing cleanser and glycerin, polyisobutene-containing lotion (CR) in clinically diagnosed sensitive skin resulting from eczema/atopic dermatitis, rosacea, or cosmetic intolerance.

Methods: 120 subjects were randomized to receive either NR or CR, twice daily for 4 weeks in this double-blind study. Blinded investigator-rated and subject-rated overall skin appearance was assessed using a 5-point scale (0=none, 4=severe) at baseline, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks. Noninvasive skin assessments for skin hydration and skin barrier function were made by corneometry and TEWL, respectively.

Results: NR resulted in a 34% improvement from baseline in investigator-rated overall skin appearance (P less than 0.001); and CR resulted in a 4% improvement. Similar NR and CR results were found in the other efficacy parameters: tactile and visual smoothness, clarity, and radiance. Both regimens improved barrier function from baseline to week 4 (17%, 15%; NR, CR, P equals NS). NR maintained hydration from baseline to week 4 while CR increased hydration by 21% (P less than 0.001). No clinically significant tolerability issues were reported in either regimen at week 4.

Conclusions: The study demonstrated that NR was effective, well tolerated, and superior to CR in the management of sensitive skin. J Drugs Dermatol. 2018;17(8):908-913.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2018

Clinical Improvements in Very Dry Skin from a Natural Ingredient-Based Moisturizing Cream Compared With a Leading Colloidal Oatmeal Control.

J Drugs Dermatol 2018 Jul;17(7):758-764

The objective of this 6-week clinical study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of a natural ingredient-based moisturizing cream versus a colloidal oatmeal moisturizing cream in improving the hydration, barrier function, appearance, and feel of dry leg skin. Thirty-two subjects completed the study. After a 5-day washout, subjects used the natural ingredient-based moisturizing cream and oatmeal-containing cream on randomly-assigned legs twice a day for a period of three weeks. For the following two weeks subjects did not use any moisturizer on their legs. Skin moisture measurements showed a statistically significant increase in hydration for both products at all time points during the treatment phase of the study. Both products reduced transepidermal water loss measurements during the treatment phase of the study, showing their abilities to improve stratum corneum barrier function. Clinical evaluations showed that both products significantly decreased visual dryness and tactile roughness during the treatment phase. Improvements in the assessed clinical parameters persisted even after treatment cessation. In conclusion, the natural ingredient-based moisturizing cream was highly effective in providing moisturization and improving the skin barrier of subjects with very dry leg skin. It also produced significant improvements in visual dryness and tactile roughness that persisted during regression. Overall, these results show that the natural ingredient-based moisturizing cream delivers comparable benefits to that of a colloidal oatmeal-containing benchmark product and is an option for health care providers and consumers who seek relief from dry skin and prefer a product with all-natural ingredients. J Drugs Dermatol. 2018;17(7):758-764.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 2018

A Natural Cream-to-Powder Formulation Developed for the Prevention of Diaper Dermatitis in Diaper-Wearing Infants and Children: Barrier Property and In-Use Tolerance Studies.

J Drugs Dermatol 2018 May;17(5):566-570

Introduction: Diaper dermatitis is a common condition that develops in the diaper area due to factors such as elevated moisture, increased skin surface pH, and exposure to irritants from urine and feces. These factors suggest interventions to prevent or treat diaper dermatitis such as exposing the skin to air, frequent diaper changes, and thorough cleansing of the diaper area. Barrier creams and powders also have a role in preventing and treating diaper dermatitis. We developed a cream-to-powder product with a formula based on corn starch and other natural ingredients for use in the diaper area.

Methods: Dye exclusion study: The barrier properties of the cream-to-powder product were assessed using a dye exclusion protocol. Skin color at treated and untreated forearm sites was measured at baseline and after exposure to crystal violet stain. The cream-to-powder product's ability to inhibit the water-soluble dye from reaching the skin was judged by comparing color changes at the treated and untreated sites. Tolerance-in-use study: The safety of the cream-to-powder product was assessed in a four-week tolerance-in-use study conducted in a group of 52 diaper-wearing infants and toddlers. Subjects' parents/guardians applied the cream-to-powder product at each diaper change. A pediatrician judged safety endpoints of erythema, dryness, and edema in the diaper area at baseline and at study end. Parents/guardians also completed a questionnaire at study end. These studies have complied with Good Clinical Practices (GCP/ICH).

Outcomes: The cream-to-powder product prevented about 70% of the test dye from reaching the skin surface, demonstrating its ability to supplement the skin barrier. The tolerance-in-use study showed no statistically significant changes in any of the safety endpoints; there were no adverse events. Parents/guardians responses to the cream-to-powder product were overwhelmingly positive. Taken together, these results support that the cream-to-powder formulation is safe and effective for helping to prevent diaper dermatitis. J Drugs Dermatol. 2018;17(5):566-570.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 2018

Effect of hydration on the permeation of ketoconazole through human nail plate in vitro.

Eur J Pharm Sci 2007 Dec 28;32(4-5):254-60. Epub 2007 Aug 28.

James L. Winkle College of Pharmacy, University of Cincinnati, OH 45267, USA.

The impact of hydration on the permeation of the antifungal drug, ketoconazole, through excised human nails in vitro was evaluated in diffusion cell studies. Nails treated with [(3)H]ketoconazole solvent-deposited onto the dorsal surface were maintained in incubators at 32 degrees C and exposed sequentially to relative humidities (dorsal side) of 15, 40, 80 and 100% over a period of 40 days. The ventral side was bathed in a pH 7.4 phosphate buffer. Ascending and descending humidity regimens were tested. Increasing the ambient RH from 15 to 100% enhanced permeation of radiolabel associated with [(3)H]ketoconazole by a factor of three. Diffusivities estimated from these data and the associated nail water contents (estimated in a separate study) can be described by a free volume theory. Therefore, formulations or treatments, which increase nail hydration, have potential to improve topical therapy for onychomycosis, if a favorable balance between drug delivery and growth conditions for the dermatophytes can be achieved.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejps.2007.07.009DOI Listing
December 2007

Water diffusivity in human nail plate.

J Pharm Sci 2007 Dec;96(12):3352-62

The University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0004, USA.

The diffusivity of water in human nail at 32 degrees C was determined for cadaveric, human finger nails having water contents ranging from 0.536 g H(2)O/g dry nail to 0.035 g H(2)O/g dry nail by measuring the desorption of tritiated water from nails suspended in water or in the vapor phase above salt solutions yielding a range of relative humidities (RH). Diffusivity increased with increasing RH from (7.7 +/- 1.3) x 10(-10) cm(2) s(-1) at 15% RH to (3.2 +/- 1.1) x 10(-7) cm(2) s(-1) in the liquid phase study at 100% RH, a more than 400-fold increase. The diffusivity values, which may be understood in terms of the equilibrium water content of the nail and a free volume theory for diffusion in hydrophilic polymers, were consistent with water diffusivities measured in other keratinized tissues including wool, horn and the corneocyte phase of stratum corneum. Analysis of the tritium desorption data was complicated by a tritium exchange process between (3)H(2)O and nail keratin, the kinetics of which are presented in part. The combination of the concentration-dependent water diffusivity with the natural water activity gradient in nail in vivo leads to the prediction of a nonlinear steady-state water concentration profile in human nail in vivo which, in turn, has implications for ungual drug delivery.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jps.20988DOI Listing
December 2007

Hydration effect on human nail permeability.

J Cosmet Sci 2006 Mar-Apr;57(2):183-4

College of Pharmacy, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2006
-->