Publications by authors named "Heloísa Ciol"

7 Publications

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Effects of photobiomodulation on the redox state of healthy and cancer cells.

Biomed Opt Express 2021 Jul 8;12(7):3902-3916. Epub 2021 Jun 8.

São Carlos Institute of Physics - University of São Paulo, São Carlos, SP, Brazil.

Photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) uses light to stimulate cells. The molecular basis of the effects of PBMT is being unveiled, but it is stated that the cytochrome-c oxidase enzyme in mitochondria, a photon acceptor of PBMT, contributes to an increase in ATP production and modulates the reduction and oxidation of electron carriers NADH and FAD. Since its effects are not fully understood, PBMT is not used on tumors. Thus, it is interesting to investigate if its effects correlate to mitochondrial metabolism and if so, how it could be linked to the optical redox ratio (ORR), defined as the ratio of FAD/(NADH + FAD) fluorescences. To that end, fibroblasts (HDFn cell line) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC-25 cell line) were irradiated with a light source of 780 nm and a total dose of 5 J/cm, and imaged by optical microscopy. PBMT down-regulated the SCC-25 ORR by 10%. Furthermore, PBMT led to an increase in ROS and ATP production in carcinoma cells after 4 h, while fibroblasts only had a modest ATP increase 6 h after irradiation. Cell lines did not show distinct cell cycle profiles, as both had an increase in G2/M cells. This study indicates that PBMT decreases the redox state of oral cancer by possibly increasing glycolysis and affects normal and tumor cells through distinct pathways. To our knowledge, this is the first study that investigated the effects of PBMT on mitochondrial metabolism from the initiation of the cascade to DNA replication. This is an essential step in the investigation of the mechanism of action of PBMT in an effort to avoid misinterpretations of a variety of combined protocols.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/BOE.421302DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8367241PMC
July 2021

One-Pot Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Carbon Dots and and Antimicrobial Photodynamic Applications.

Front Microbiol 2021 21;12:662149. Epub 2021 Jun 21.

São Carlos Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Carlos, Brazil.

Carbon-based photosensitizers are more attractive than the other ones based on their low cost, high stability, broadband of light absorption, tunable emission spectra, high quantum yield, water solubility, high resistance to metabolic degradation, and selective delivery. These properties allow multiple applications in the field of biology and medicine. The present study evaluated and the antimicrobial photodynamic effect of a one-pot microwave produced C-DOTS based on citric acid. The assays assessed the effectiveness of illuminated C-DOTS (C-DOTS + light) against suspension and biofilm. The concentrations of 6.9 and 13.8 mg/mL of C-DOTS and light doses of 20 and 40 J/cm were able to reduce significantly the microorganisms. Based on these parameters and results, the experiments were conducted in mice, evaluating this treatment on wounds contaminated with The viability test showed that C-DOTS-mediated photodynamic inactivation reduced 10 log of the bacteria present on the skin lesions. These results, altogether, showed that antibacterial photodynamic therapy using C-DOTS is a promising and viable treatment for Gram-positive bacteria-infected wounds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2021.662149DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8255795PMC
June 2021

Hydrogel from all in all lignocellulosic sisal fibers macromolecular components.

Int J Biol Macromol 2021 Jun 20;181:978-989. Epub 2021 Apr 20.

Macromolecular Materials and Lignocellulosic Fibers Group, Center of Research on Science and Technology of BioResources, São Carlos Institute of Chemistry, Trabalhador São Carlense Ave, 400, 13566-590 São Carlos, SP, Brazil. Electronic address:

The heterogeneous structure of lignocellulosic biomass makes it difficult to dissolve its main components (cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin) by solvent action with the aim of further applying the mixture of the biological macromolecules generated in the solvent medium. In the present study, the dissolution efficiency (DE) of lignocellulosic sisal fibers in the lithium chloride/dimethylacetamide solvent system (LiCl/DMAc) was evaluated for further application in the formation of hydrogels. Catalytic amounts of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) were used in some experiments, which increased the DE from 40% to 90%. The regeneration of the solutions, either previously filtered or not, led to hydrogels based on sisal lignocellulosic biomass. In brief, the properties of the hydrogels were influenced by the content of the lignocellulosic components in the hydrogels, present both in the dissolved fraction and in the incorporated undissolved fraction (when nonfiltered solutions were used). Hydrogels presented water absorption up to 7479% and resorption content in the lyophilized hydrogel up to 2133%. Extracts obtained from preselected hydrogels exhibited cell viability up to 127% compared to the control group when in contact with fibroblast cultures, exhibiting their noncytotoxic properties. This attribute increased the range of possible applications of these hydrogels, ranging from agriculture to biocompatible materials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2021.04.088DOI Listing
June 2021

MAL-associated methyl nicotinate for topical PDT improvement.

J Photochem Photobiol B 2020 Dec 2;213:112071. Epub 2020 Nov 2.

Sao Carlos Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil; Hagler Fellow, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA.

Photosensitization of all tissue in sufficient quantity to generate damage is one of the limiting factors for Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) efficiency. Methyl nicotinate (MN) is a thermogenic and vasodilating substance that facilitates the topical tissue penetration of some compounds. The topical MAL (methyl aminolevulinate) PDT is commonly used as a precursor of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). This study investigates the safety of topical use in NM, as well as its ability to improve the efficiency of topical PDT. For this, we investigate the cytotoxicity of MN, as well as its actions in increasing cellular metabolism and vasodilation. Besides, its ability to optimize the formation of PpIX in the tissue when associated with MAL cream was investigated, besides assessing the severity of necrosis obtained by treatments. The cytotoxicity of MN was tested for concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1% in cell culture. For the concentration of 0.5%, the cellular metabolism was evaluated using confocal microscopy to calculate the redox rate. In the Chorioallantoic Membrane Model, vasodilation was evaluated for concentrations of 0.5 and 1% MN during 1 h of incubation. In the animal model, the healthy skin of Wistar rat was used to evaluate the production of PpIX in the tissue and the degree of necrosis obtained by Photodynamic therapy when using NM associated with methyl aminolevulinate. It was observed the non-cytotoxicity in vitro of MN in the concentration used (0.5%) and its ability to increase cellular metabolism. In a chorioallantoic model, the MN vasodilation power was demonstrated for different caliber of vessels. In vivo studies are showing that the incorporation of MN in the MAL cream increases the amount of PpIX produced in the tissue causing a higher effect on the epidermis after PDT. This improvement of the protocol may make the procedure more effective both in the destruction of tumor tissue and in the treatment of deeper cells decreasing possible recurrence, in addition to allowing improvements in the protocol, such as reducing the cream's incubation time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jphotobiol.2020.112071DOI Listing
December 2020

Filaments and fingers: Novel structural aspects of the single septin from .

J Biol Chem 2017 06 5;292(26):10899-10911. Epub 2017 May 5.

From the Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, CEP: 13563-120, São Carlos, SP, Brazil,

Septins are filament-forming GTP-binding proteins involved in many essential cellular events related to cytoskeletal dynamics and maintenance. Septins can self-assemble into heterocomplexes, which polymerize into highly organized, cell membrane-interacting filaments. The number of septin genes varies among organisms, and although their structure and function have been thoroughly studied in opisthokonts (including animals and fungi), no structural studies have been reported for other organisms. This makes the single septin from (CrSEPT) a particularly attractive model for investigating whether functional homopolymeric septin filaments also exist. CrSEPT was detected at the base of the flagella in , suggesting that CrSEPT is involved in the formation of a membrane-diffusion barrier. Using transmission electron microscopy, we observed that recombinant CrSEPT forms long filaments with dimensions comparable with those of the canonical structure described for opisthokonts. The GTP-binding domain of CrSEPT purified as a nucleotide-free monomer that hydrolyzes GTP and readily binds its analog guanosine 5'-3--(thio)triphosphate. We also found that upon nucleotide binding, CrSEPT formed dimers that were stabilized by an interface involving the ligand (G-interface). Across this interface, one monomer supplied a catalytic arginine to the opposing subunit, greatly accelerating the rate of GTP hydrolysis. This is the first report of an arginine finger observed in a septin and suggests that CrSEPT may act as its own GTP-activating protein. The finger is conserved in all algal septin sequences, suggesting a possible correlation between the ability to form homopolymeric filaments and the accelerated rate of hydrolysis that it provides.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M116.762229DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5491775PMC
June 2017

Maternal western style diet increases susceptibility to chemically-induced mammary carcinogenesis in female rats offspring.

Nutr Cancer 2014 21;66(8):1293-303. Epub 2014 Oct 21.

a Department of Pathology, Botucatu Medical School , São Paulo State University , São Paulo , Brazil.

The present study investigated whether maternal exposure to western style diet (WD) increases susceptibility to mammary carcinogenesis induced by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) in female offspring. Pregnant female Sprague-Dawley rats received WD diet or control diet from gestational day 12 until postnatal day (PND) 21. At PND 21, female offspring received a single dose of MNU (50 mg/kg body weight) and were fed chow diet until PND 110. Mammary gland structures were assessed on whole-mount preparations in the offspring at PND 21, and tumor morphology was examined at PND 110. Immunohistochemical analysis for cell proliferation (PCNA), apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3) and estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α) was performed in mammary terminal end buds (TEBs) at PND 21, and PCNA, ER-α, and p63 analysis in mammary tumors at PND 110. Maternal WD intake induced a significant increase in the number of TEBs (P = 0.024) and in PCNA labeling index (P < 0.020) in the mammary glands at PND 21. Tumor multiplicity, tumor weight, and PCNA labeling indexes were significantly higher in the WD offspring than that of the control offspring (P < 0.05). These findings indicate that maternal western style diet potentially enhanced the development of mammary tumors induced by MNU in female offspring, possibly by affecting the mammary gland differentiation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01635581.2014.956256DOI Listing
August 2015

Epidermal growth factor receptor and KRAS mutations in Brazilian lung cancer patients.

Clinics (Sao Paulo) 2012 ;67(5):419-24

Consultoria em Patologia, Botucatu, SP, Brazil.

Objective: Epidermal growth factor receptor is involved in the pathogenesis of non-small cell lung cancer and has recently emerged as an important target for molecular therapeutics. The KRAS oncogene also plays an important role in the development of lung cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of epidermal growth factor receptor and KRAS mutations in a population of Brazilian patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

Methods: A total of 207 specimens from Brazilian patients with non-small cell lung cancer were analyzed for activating epidermal growth factor receptor and KRAS somatic mutations, and their associations with clinicopathological characteristics (including age, gender, ethnicity, smoking habits, and histological subtype) were examined.

Results: We identified 63 cases (30.4%) with epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and 30 cases (14.6%) with KRAS mutations. The most frequent epidermal growth factor receptor mutation we detected was a deletion in exon 19 (60.3%, 38 patients), followed by an L858R amino acid substitution in exon 21 (27%, 17 patients). The most common types of KRAS mutations were found in codon 12. There were no significant differences in epidermal growth factor receptor or KRAS mutations by gender or primary versus metastatic lung cancer. There was a higher prevalence of KRAS mutations in the non-Asian patients. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutations were more prevalent in adenocarcinomas than in non-adenocarcinoma histological types. Being a non-smoker was significantly associated with the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations, but the prevalence of KRAS mutations was significantly associated with smoking.

Conclusions: This study is the first to examine the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor and KRAS mutations in a Brazilian population sample with non-small cell lung cancer.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3351259PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.6061/clinics/2012(05)03DOI Listing
February 2013
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