Publications by authors named "Helle K Larsen"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Risk of Anogenital Warts in Renal Transplant Recipients Compared with Immunocompetent Controls: A Cross-sectional Clinical Study.

Acta Derm Venereol 2021 Jul 13;101(7):adv00497. Epub 2021 Jul 13.

Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Bispebjerg Hospital, DK-2400 Copenhagen, Denmark. E-mail:

Renal transplant recipients have increased risk of human papilloma virus-related anogenital (pre)cancers. Less is known about their risk of anogenital warts. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence and odds of anogenital warts in renal transplant recipients compared with immunocompetent controls, and to assess risk factors for intra- and perianal warts in renal transplant recipients. The study examined 248 renal transplant recipients and 250 controls for cutaneous and mucosal anogenital warts. Participants completed a questionnaire on lifestyle and sexual habits. For external anogenital warts (including penile, vulvar and perianal warts), renal transplant recipients had higher prevalence and odds than controls, both in men (8.1% vs 1.6%, adjusted odds ratio (ORadjusted)=5.09, 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.03-25.04) and women (11.3% vs 1.6%, ORadjusted=8.09, 95% CI 1.69-38.82). For intra-anal warts, there was no clear pattern of higher odds in renal transplant recipients than controls. Current smoking and having had receptive anal sex increased the risk of intra-/perianal warts in renal transplant recipients. In conclusion, renal transplant recipients in this study had higher odds of external anogenital warts than controls.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2340/00015555-3858DOI Listing
July 2021

Sex-associated Risk Factors for Co-infection with Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoea among Patients Presenting to a Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinic.

Acta Derm Venereol 2021 Jan 4;101(1):adv00356. Epub 2021 Jan 4.

Department of Dermato-Venereology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg Hospital, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, DK-2400 Copenhagen NV, Denmark. E-mail:

The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of patients co-infected with Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoea. A retrospective case-control study was performed, which included 399 co-infected patients seen at a sexually transmitted infection clinic in Copenhagen, Denmark. Case-control groups included 300 patients who tested positive only for N. gonorrhoea, 300 who tested positive only for C. trachomatis, and 300 who tested negative for both N. gonorrhoea and C. trachomatis in the same study period. For men, non-Danish origin (odds ratio (OR) 2.3, 95% confidence interval (Cl) 1.34-4.12), previous sexually transmitted infections with C . trachomatis (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.94-5.92) and N. gonorrhoea (OR 10.6, 95% CI 6.36-17.76), and higher number of sex partners (OR 1.7, 95% Cl 1.40-2.28) were significantly associated with diagnosis of co-infection. For women, previous sexually transmitted infections with C. trachomatis (OR 6.7, 95% CI 3.89-11.78) and N. gonorrhoea (OR 10.4, 95% CI 4.99-21.71), and higher number of sex partners (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.28-2.56) were significantly associated with a diagnosis of co-infection, whereas being of non-Danish origin was, in some cases, a protective factor (OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.17-0.69). Furthermore, this study demonstrated sex-associated characteristics that should raise concern about co- infection, including: for men, being of non-Danish origin, men who have sex with men status, and higher age, and, for women, young age, in particular, and previous sexually transmitted infections.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2340/00015555-3721DOI Listing
January 2021

Risk of Anal High-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions Among Renal Transplant Recipients Compared With Immunocompetent Controls.

Clin Infect Dis 2021 07;73(1):21-29

Unit of Virus, Lifestyle and Genes, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Background: Renal transplant recipients (RTRs) have increased risk of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers, including anal cancer. We investigated the prevalence of anal high-grade intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) in RTRs compared with immunocompetent controls and risk factors for anal HSIL in RTRs.

Methods: We included 247 RTRs and 248 controls in this cross-sectional study. We obtained anal samples for HPV testing with INNO-LiPA and performed high-resolution anoscopy on all participants. The participants completed a questionnaire on lifestyle and sexual habits. We used logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) of histologically confirmed anal HSIL in RTRs vs controls and risk factors for anal HSIL in RTRs, stratified by sex and anal high-risk (hr) HPV status, adjusting for age, smoking, lifetime sexual partners, and receptive anal sex.

Results: RTRs had higher anal HSIL prevalence than controls, both among men (6.5% vs 0.8%; adjusted OR [aOR], 11.21 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.46-291.17]) and women (15.4% vs 4.0%; aOR, 6.41 [95% CI, 2.14-24.10]). Among those with anal hrHPV, RTRs had higher anal HSIL prevalence than controls (33.8% vs 9.5%; aOR, 6.06 [95% CI, 2.16-20.27]). Having had receptive anal sex (aOR, 6.23 [95% CI, 2.23-19.08]) or genital warts (aOR, 4.21 [95% CI, 1.53-11.48]) were risk factors for anal HSIL in RTRs. All HSIL cases occurred in individuals with anal hrHPV.

Conclusions: RTRs had increased risk of anal HSIL compared with immunocompetent controls, with particularly high prevalence in female RTRs. Receptive anal sex, previous genital warts, and anal hrHPV infection were risk factors for anal HSIL in RTRs. Screening for anal HSIL in RTRs should be considered.

Clinical Trials Registration: NCT03018927.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciaa781DOI Listing
July 2021

Herpetiform Manifestation of Primary Syphilis: A Case Series.

Acta Derm Venereol 2020 Mar 12;100(6):adv00072. Epub 2020 Mar 12.

Department of Dermato-Venereology, Bispebjerg Hospital, DK- 2400 Copenhagen, Denmark.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2340/00015555-3414DOI Listing
March 2020

Prevalence, type distribution and risk factors for oral HPV in Danish renal transplant recipients.

Oral Dis 2020 Mar 12;26(2):484-488. Epub 2019 Dec 12.

Unit of Virus, Lifestyle and Genes, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Objective: To assess the prevalence and type distribution of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) among renal transplant recipients (RTRs) and healthy controls and to examine risk factors for oral HPV among RTRs.

Materials And Methods: During 2016-2017 we recruited 250 RTRs and 250 controls. Oral samples were tested for HPV DNA with INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra II. All participants answered a questionnaire on lifestyle and sexual behaviour, and characteristics of RTRs were obtained from medical files. We assessed prevalence and type distribution of oral HPV. Using logistic regression, the risk of oral HPV and risk factors for oral HPV among RTRs were estimated as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI).

Results: Overall, 30 RTRs (12.1%) and 26 controls (10.4%) were oral HPV positive (OR = 1.14; 95% CI: 0.64-2.05). Female RTRs tended to have a higher oral HPV prevalence than controls (OR = 1.73; 95% CI: 0.63-4.77), while no difference was observed among men. HPV51 was the commonest genotype. Sexual behaviour tended to be associated with oral HPV among RTRs.

Conclusions: There was no overall difference in oral HPV prevalence between RTRs and controls, but female RTRs tended to have a higher prevalence of oral HPV than controls.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/odi.13240DOI Listing
March 2020

Human papillomavirus-related anogenital premalignancies and cancer in renal transplant recipients: A Danish nationwide, registry-based cohort study.

Int J Cancer 2020 05 2;146(9):2413-2422. Epub 2019 Aug 2.

Unit of Virus, Lifestyle and Genes, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.

In this registry-based cohort study, we estimated the risk of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related anogenital premalignancies and cancer in renal transplant recipients (RTRs) compared to a nontransplanted comparison cohort. We identified all first-time RTRs in Denmark during 1990-2015 in a nationwide nephrology register. For each RTR, we randomly selected 50 age- and sex-matched non-RTRs from the background population. The study population was followed for diagnoses of cervical, vaginal, vulvar, penile and anal intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2-3 (IN2/3) and cancer for up to 27 years. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) of anogenital IN2/3 and cancer in RTRs vs. non-RTRs by Cox regression separately for men and women using age as underlying timescale, adjusting for income, education, HPV vaccination and immunocompromising conditions. We included 4,261 RTRs and 213,673 non-RTRs. RTRs had increased hazard of cervical (HR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.7-2.8), vaginal (HR = 35.0, 95% CI: 13.9-87.7), vulvar (HR = 16.4, 95% CI: 10.4-25.8), penile (HR = 21.9, 95% CI: 11.1-43.5) and anal (women: HR = 51.1, 95% CI: 28.0-93.1; men: HR = 39.0, 95% CI: 16.7-91.1) IN2/3. The HRs of anogenital cancers were also increased at most sites. The HR of anogenital IN2/3 in female RTRs tended to be higher during graft function than during dialysis. In female RTRs aged <40 years at transplantation, 10-15% had cervical IN2/3 and 5-12% had vaginal/vulvar/anal IN2/3 within 20 years after transplantation, compared to 4-8 and 0.2-0.4%, respectively, of female non-RTRs. In conclusion, RTRs had substantially higher risk of HPV-related anogenital premalignancies and cancer than non-RTRs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.32565DOI Listing
May 2020

Quality of life of homosexual males with genital warts: a qualitative study.

BMC Res Notes 2010 Nov 4;3:280. Epub 2010 Nov 4.

AnthroConsult, Aarhus, Denmark.

Background: A recent qualitative study in Denmark showed that genital warts (GWs) can considerably lower the quality of life of heterosexual patients. In this follow-up study, we interviewed men having sex with men (MSM) suffering from GWs to obtain an in-depth understanding of their perception of GWs and determine the extent to which minority (homosexual) cultural issues affect these patients' experiences. Qualitative interviews with six MSM were performed using a semi-structured interview guide. Questions were formulated on the basis of the earlier qualitative study in heterosexual patients with GWs along with a literature review. Data were analysed using a medical anthropological approach.

Findings: Many MSM worried about being stigmatised and excluded from the small homosexual 'scene', their key social group, thereby lowering their chances of finding sex and love. Most participants had suffered from GWs for several years which added to the negative psycho-sexual and social effects of the disease. Participants' fears of developing anal cancer were similar to those expressed about cervical cancer by females with GWs.

Conclusions: Ano-genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is common and has a serious psychological and sexual impact among MSM. However, they do not benefit to the same extent as heterosexual men from the herd immunity effect of HPV vaccination of girls. The pathological profile and concerns specific to MSM should be addressed when communicating with these patients, and should be taken into account when considering HPV vaccination of boys.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1756-0500-3-280DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2989980PMC
November 2010

The quality of life of patients with genital warts: a qualitative study.

BMC Public Health 2010 Mar 7;10:113. Epub 2010 Mar 7.

Medical anthropology, AnthroConsult, Fynsgade 24, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.

Background: Genital warts, which are caused by infection with human papillomavirus (HPV), are one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases in Europe. Although genital warts are commonly perceived as a non-serious condition, treatment is often long, of varying effectiveness and the recurrence rate is high. Very few studies have been performed on the personal consequences of genital warts. The aim of this qualitative study, set in Denmark, was to examine the ways in which genital warts may affect patients' quality of life.

Methods: To obtain an in-depth understanding of patients' perceptions of genital warts, we used qualitative focus-group interviews with five men and five women aged between 18 and 30 years who had genital warts. The interview guide was based on a literature review that identified important issues and questions. The data were analysed using a medical anthropological approach.

Results: Patients' experiences were related to cultural conceptions of venereal diseases and the respective identities and sexuality of the sexes. The disease had negative psychological and social effects both for men and for women and it affected their sex and love lives, in particular. The psychological burden of the disease was increased by the uncertain timeline and the varying effectiveness of treatment. We identified a need for more patient information about the disease and its psycho-sexual aspects.

Conclusions: The men and women participating in this study considered their quality of life to be significantly lowered because of genital warts. The experiences described by the participants give insights that may be valuable in treatment and counselling.The quadrivalent HPV vaccine that has now been added to the childhood vaccination programme for girls in Denmark for the prevention of cervical cancer can also prevent 90% of cases of genital warts. Our results suggest that HPV vaccination could considerably reduce the largely unacknowledged psychological and social burden associated with genital warts, in men as well as women.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-10-113DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2848198PMC
March 2010

Paring and intense pulsed light versus paring alone for recalcitrant hand and foot warts: a randomized clinical trial with blinded outcome evaluation.

Lasers Surg Med 2010 Feb;42(2):179-84

Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, 2400 Copenhagen, Denmark.

Background And Objectives: Treatment of recalcitrant viral warts remains a therapeutic challenge. Intense pulsed light (IPL) has been suggested effective to clear wart tissue. The objective was in a randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of paring followed by IPL versus paring alone for recalcitrant hand and foot warts.

Materials And Methods: Eighty-nine patients with recalcitrant hand and foot warts were included and randomized (1:1) to three treatments at 3-week intervals with either paring of warts followed by IPL or paring of warts alone. IPL was given with the Ellipse Flex IPL system (Danish Dermatologic Development A/S, Hørsholm, Denmark, 400-950 nm, 5.5 millisecond pulse duration in double pulses with a 2 millisecond interval, 26.0-32.5 J/cm(2) repetitive passes). The primary outcome was complete and partial clearance of warts evaluated by blinded photo assessment at 6 weeks after final treatment. Secondary outcomes were treatment related pain and adverse reactions.

Results: We found no significant difference in clearance of warts between the two intervention groups (OR 1.64, 95% confidence interval 0.62-4.38). Paring followed by IPL resulted in complete or partial clearance of wart tissue in nine (22%) and five patients (12.2%) versus five (13.5%) and four patients (10.8%) from paring alone. Mostly plantar warts were treated (92.1%). The pain intensity after paring and IPL was moderate and significantly higher than the pain intensity after paring alone (P<0.0005). No adverse reactions were observed from the two interventions.

Conclusion: Paring followed by IPL did not differ significantly from paring alone in clearance of recalcitrant hand and foot warts but caused significantly more pain.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/lsm.20852DOI Listing
February 2010

Detecting a low prevalence of latent tuberculosis among health care workers in Denmark detected by M. tuberculosis specific IFN-gamma whole-blood test.

Scand J Infect Dis 2007 ;39(6-7):554-9

International Reference Laboratory of Mycobacteriology, Statens Serum Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark.

The study was designed to estimate prevalence of tuberculosis infection among health care workers, using the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the new M. tuberculosis specific diagnostic whole-blood test and to identify possible risk factors. Employees at 2 departments of infectious diseases in Copenhagen were invited to enter the study. All attendants completed a questionnaire, had a TST and blood drawn for detection of interferon-gamma produced after stimulation with M. tuberculosis specific antigens ESAT-6 and CFP-10 (QuantiFERON-TB-Gold, Cellestis). 47 of 139 (34%) participants had a positive TST whereas only 2 of 139 (1%) had a positive QuantiFERON TB-Gold test (QFT-TB). 42 of 106 (40%) BCG vaccinated had positive TST (> or =12 mm) compared with 2 of 27 (7%) unvaccinated persons. Among 47 persons with positive TST, 42 (89%) were BCG- vaccinated. The 2 QFT-TB positive participants as well as the remaining 45 TST positive participants showed no sign of active tuberculous disease and were allocated to 6-month clinical follow-up, without medical therapy. Today, 1.5 y later, all remain healthy. The high rate of positive TST among health care workers was most probably due to BCG vaccination and not to infection with M. tuberculosis. The overall transmission rate determined by QFT-TB was found to be very low. The QFT-TB may be useful in distinguishing persons with latent TB infection from persons with positive TST due to BCG vaccination and its use may reduce anxiety.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00365540601148483DOI Listing
November 2007

Effects of urodilatin on natriuresis in cirrhosis patients with sodium retention.

BMC Gastroenterol 2007 Jan 26;7. Epub 2007 Jan 26.

Research Laboratory of Nephrology and Hypertension, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.

Background: Sodium retention and ascites are serious clinical problems in cirrhosis. Urodilatin (URO) is a peptide with paracrine effects in decreasing sodium reabsorption in the distal nephron. Our aim was to investigate the renal potency of synthetic URO on urine sodium excretion in cirrhosis patients with sodium retention and ascites.

Methods: Seven cirrhosis patients with diuretics-resistant sodium retention received a short-term (90 min) infusion of URO in a single-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study. In the basal state after rehydration the patients had urine sodium excretion < 50 mmol/24 h.

Results: URO transiently increased urine sodium excretion from 22 +/- 16 micromol/min (mean +/- SD) to 78 +/- 41 mumol/min (P < 0.05) and there was no effect of placebo (29 +/- 14 to 44 +/- 32). The increase of URO's second messenger after the receptor, cGMP, was normal. URO had no effect on urine flow or on blood pressure. Most of the patients had highly elevated plasma levels of renin, angiotensin II and aldosterone and URO did not change these.

Conclusion: The short-term low-dose URO infusion increased the sodium excretion of the patients. The increase was small but systematic and potentially clinically important for such patients. The small response contrasts the preserved responsiveness of the URO receptors. The markedly activated systemic pressor hormones in cirrhosis evidently antagonized the local tubular effects of URO.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-230X-7-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1794254PMC
January 2007
-->