Publications by authors named "Helene Dreyfus"

19 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Gene- and pathway-level analyses of iCOGS variants highlight novel signaling pathways underlying familial breast cancer susceptibility.

Int J Cancer 2021 Apr 9;148(8):1895-1909. Epub 2021 Jan 9.

Inserm, U900, Institut Curie, Paris, France.

Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in over 180 loci have been associated with breast cancer (BC) through genome-wide association studies involving mostly unselected population-based case-control series. Some of them modify BC risk of women carrying a BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutation and may also explain BC risk variability in BC-prone families with no BRCA1/2 mutation. Here, we assessed the contribution of SNPs of the iCOGS array in GENESIS consisting of BC cases with no BRCA1/2 mutation and a sister with BC, and population controls. Genotyping data were available for 1281 index cases, 731 sisters with BC, 457 unaffected sisters and 1272 controls. In addition to the standard SNP-level analysis using index cases and controls, we performed pedigree-based association tests to capture transmission information in the sibships. We also performed gene- and pathway-level analyses to maximize the power to detect associations with lower-frequency SNPs or those with modest effect sizes. While SNP-level analyses identified 18 loci, gene-level analyses identified 112 genes. Furthermore, 31 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and 7 Atlas of Cancer Signaling Network pathways were highlighted (false discovery rate of 5%). Using results from the "index case-control" analysis, we built pathway-derived polygenic risk scores (PRS) and assessed their performance in the population-based CECILE study and in a data set composed of GENESIS-affected sisters and CECILE controls. Although these PRS had poor predictive value in the general population, they performed better than a PRS built using our SNP-level findings, and we found that the joint effect of family history and PRS needs to be considered in risk prediction models.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.33457DOI Listing
April 2021

Familial breast cancer and DNA repair genes: Insights into known and novel susceptibility genes from the GENESIS study, and implications for multigene panel testing.

Int J Cancer 2019 04 13;144(8):1962-1974. Epub 2018 Nov 13.

Inserm, Paris, France.

Pathogenic variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 only explain the underlying genetic cause of about 10% of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families. Because of cost-effectiveness, multigene panel testing is often performed even if the clinical utility of testing most of the genes remains questionable. The purpose of our study was to assess the contribution of rare, deleterious-predicted variants in DNA repair genes in familial breast cancer (BC) in a well-characterized and homogeneous population. We analyzed 113 DNA repair genes selected from either an exome sequencing or a candidate gene approach in the GENESIS study, which includes familial BC cases with no BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation and having a sister with BC (N = 1,207), and general population controls (N = 1,199). Sequencing data were filtered for rare loss-of-function variants (LoF) and likely deleterious missense variants (MV). We confirmed associations between LoF and MV in PALB2, ATM and CHEK2 and BC occurrence. We also identified for the first time associations between FANCI, MAST1, POLH and RTEL1 and BC susceptibility. Unlike other associated genes, carriers of an ATM LoF had a significantly higher risk of developing BC than carriers of an ATM MV (OR = 17.4 vs. OR = 1.6; p = 0.002). Hence, our approach allowed us to specify BC relative risks associated with deleterious-predicted variants in PALB2, ATM and CHEK2 and to add MAST1, POLH, RTEL1 and FANCI to the list of DNA repair genes possibly involved in BC susceptibility. We also highlight that different types of variants within the same gene can lead to different risk estimates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.31921DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6587727PMC
April 2019

GATA2 gene analysis in several forms of hematological malignancies including familial aggregations.

Ann Hematol 2017 Oct 27;96(10):1635-1639. Epub 2017 Jul 27.

UR "Biologie moléculaire des leucémies et lymphomes", Laboratoire de Biochimie, Faculté de Médecine de Sousse, Université de Sousse, Avenue Mohamed Karoui, 4000, Sousse, Tunisia.

The genetic predisposition to familial hematological malignancies has been previously reported highlighting inherited gene mutations. Several genes have been reported but genetic basis remains not well defined. In this study, we extended our investigation to a potential candidate GATA2 gene which was analyzed by direct sequencing in 119 cases including familial aggregations with a variety of hematological malignancies and sporadic acute leukemia belonging to Tunisian and French populations. We reported a deleterious p.Arg396Gln GATA2 mutation in one patient diagnosed with both sporadic acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and breast cancer. We also reported several GATA2 variations in familial cases. The absence of deleterious mutations in this large cohort of familial aggregations of hematological malignancies may strengthen the hypothesis that GATA2 mutations are an important predisposing factor, although as a secondary genetic event, required for the development of overt malignant disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00277-017-3076-9DOI Listing
October 2017

ARLTS1, potential candidate gene in familial aggregation of hematological malignancies.

Bull Cancer 2017 Feb 17;104(2):123-127. Epub 2016 Nov 17.

Université de Sousse, faculté de médecine de Sousse, laboratoire de Biochimie, UR « biologie moléculaire des leucémies et lymphomes », avenue Mohamed Karoui, 4000 Sousse, Tunisia.

Introduction: Genetic predisposition to familial hematological malignancies was previously described through several epidemiological analyses, but the genetic basis remains unclear. The tumor-suppressor ARLTS1 gene was previously described in sporadic hematological malignancies and familial cancer context.

Methods: In this study, we sequence the ARLTS1 gene in 100 patients belonging to 88 independent Tunisian and French families.

Results: After gene sequencing, we report 8 genetic variations, most of which were previously reported in several cancer forms. The most common variants were W149X and C148R and were previously associated to B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to high-risk of familial breast cancer.

Conclusions: These results emphasize the fact that ARLTS1 gene mutations can be considered as a potential predisposing factor in familial hematological malignancies and other several cancer forms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bulcan.2016.10.016DOI Listing
February 2017

Familial hematological malignancies: new IDH2 mutation.

Ann Hematol 2016 Dec 3;95(12):1943-1947. Epub 2016 Sep 3.

UR "Biologie moléculaire des leucémies et lymphomes," Laboratoire de Biochimie, Faculté de Médecine de Sousse, Université de Sousse - Tunisie, Avenue Mohamed Karoui, 4002, Sousse, Tunisia.

Isocitrate dehydrogenase IDH 1 and IDH 2 mutations were reported in several cancer forms, especially in hematological malignancies, but were never been investigated in familial aggregation. The aim of this study is to determine whether germline isocitrate dehydrogenase genes mutations are involved.We targeted IDH1 and IDH2 genes in 104 familial cases belonging to Tunisian and French populations, including several forms of hematological malignancies and cosegregated solid tumors.We report one IDH1 variant: c.315 G>T, p.Gly105Gly in 15 % of cases, which was assigned to the worst outcome in several studies. Three IDH2 variants were found, among them, one intronic substitution c.543+45 G>A (rs142033117) and two new variants not previously described: c.389 A>T, p.Lys130Met and c.414 T>C, p.Thr138Thr. The p.Lys130Met was found in one case diagnosed with Waldenstrom's disease with familial history of cancer. The enrolled in silico analysis, the functional study, and the absence of this variant in control population strengthen the hypothesis of its deleterious effect.From an extended number of candidate genes analyzed in familial hematological malignancies, IDH2 might be considerably involved since we reported a potential damaging effect.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00277-016-2813-9DOI Listing
December 2016

Mutational analysis of JAK2, CBL, RUNX1, and NPM1 genes in familial aggregation of hematological malignancies.

Ann Hematol 2016 Jun 23;95(7):1043-50. Epub 2016 Apr 23.

UR "Biologie moléculaire des leucémies et lymphomes", Laboratoire de Biochimie, Faculté de Médecine de Sousse, Université de Sousse, Avenue Mohamed Karoui, 4000, Sousse, Tunisia.

Familial aggregation of hematological malignancies has been reported highlighting inherited genetic predisposition. In this study, we targeted four candidate genes: JAK2 and RUNX1 genes assuring a prominent function in hematological process and CBL and NPM1 as proto-oncogenes. Their disruption was described in several sporadic hematological malignancies. The aim of this study is to determine whether JAK2, CBL, RUNX1, and NPM1 germline genes mutations are involved in familial hematological malignancies. Using direct sequencing, we analyzed JAK2 (exons 12 and 14); CBL (exons 7, 8 and 9); NPM1 (exon 12) and the entire RUNX1 in 88 independent families belonging to Tunisian and French populations. Twenty-one sporadic acute leukemias were included in this study. We reported a heterozygous intronic c.1641 + 6 T > C JAK2 variant (rs182123615) found in two independent familial cases diagnosed with gastric lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma. The in silico analysis suggested a potential impact on splicing, but the functional splicing minigene reporter assay on rs182123615 variant showed no aberrant transcripts. In one sporadic acute myeloblastic leukemia, we reported an insertion 846 in. TGTT in exon 12 of NPM1 gene that may impact the normal reading frame. The rs182123615 JAK2 variant was described in several contexts including myeloproliferative neoplasms and congenital erythrocytosis and was supposed to be pathogenic. Through this current study, we established the assessment of pathogenicity of rs182123615 and we classified it rather as rare polymorphism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00277-016-2678-yDOI Listing
June 2016

The genomic architecture of NLRP7 is Alu rich and predisposes to disease-associated large deletions.

Eur J Hum Genet 2016 10 9;24(10):1445-52. Epub 2016 Mar 9.

Department of Human Genetics, McGill University Health Centre Research Institute, Montréal, Canada.

NLRP7 is a major gene responsible for recurrent hydatidiform moles. Here, we report 11 novel NLRP7 protein truncating variants, of which five deletions of more than 1-kb. We analyzed the transcriptional consequences of four variants. We demonstrate that one large homozygous deletion removes NLRP7 transcription start site and results in the complete absence of its transcripts in a patient in good health besides her reproductive problem. This observation strengthens existing data on the requirement of NLRP7 only for female reproduction. We show that two other variants affecting the splice acceptor of exon 6 lead to its in-frame skipping while another variant affecting the splice donor site of exon 9 leads to an in-frame insertion of 54 amino acids. Our characterization of the deletion breakpoints demonstrated that most of the breakpoints occurred within Alu repeats and the deletions were most likely mediated by microhomology events. Our data define a hotspot of Alu instability and deletions in intron 5 with six different breakpoints and rearrangements. Analysis of NLRP7 genomic sequences for repetitive elements demonstrated that Alu repeats represent 48% of its intronic sequences and these repeats seem to have been inserted into the common NLRP2/7 primate ancestor before its duplication into two genes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ejhg.2016.9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5027696PMC
October 2016

GENESIS: a French national resource to study the missing heritability of breast cancer.

BMC Cancer 2016 Jan 12;16:13. Epub 2016 Jan 12.

Inserm, U900, Paris, France.

Background: Less than 20% of familial breast cancer patients who undergo genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carry a pathogenic mutation in one of these two genes. The GENESIS (GENE SISter) study was designed to identify new breast cancer susceptibility genes in women attending cancer genetics clinics and with no BRCA1/2 mutation.

Methods: The study involved the French national network of family cancer clinics. It was based on enrichment in genetic factors of the recruited population through case selection relying on familial criteria, but also on the consideration of environmental factors and endophenotypes like mammary density or tumor characteristics to assess potential genetic heterogeneity. One of the initial aims of GENESIS was to recruit affected sibpairs. Siblings were eligible when index cases and at least one affected sister were diagnosed with infiltrating mammary or ductal adenocarcinoma, with no BRCA1/2 mutation. In addition, unrelated controls and unaffected sisters were recruited. The enrolment of patients, their relatives and their controls, the collection of the clinical, epidemiological, familial and biological data were centralized by a coordinating center.

Results: Inclusion of participants started in February 2007 and ended in December 2013. A total of 1721 index cases, 826 affected sisters, 599 unaffected sisters and 1419 controls were included. 98% of participants completed the epidemiological questionnaire, 97% provided a blood sample, and 76% were able to provide mammograms. Index cases were on average 59 years old at inclusion, were born in 1950, and were 49.7 years of age at breast cancer diagnosis. The mean age at diagnosis of affected sisters was slightly higher (51.4 years). The representativeness of the control group was verified.

Conclusions: The size of the study, the availability of biological specimens and the clinical data collection together with the detailed and complete epidemiological questionnaire make this a unique national resource for investigation of the missing heritability of breast cancer, by taking into account environmental and life style factors and stratifying data on endophenotypes to decrease genetic heterogeneity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12885-015-2028-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4711059PMC
January 2016

An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers.

Authors:
Sophie Blein Claire Bardel Vincent Danjean Lesley McGuffog Sue Healey Daniel Barrowdale Andrew Lee Joe Dennis Karoline B Kuchenbaecker Penny Soucy Mary Beth Terry Wendy K Chung David E Goldgar Saundra S Buys Ramunas Janavicius Laima Tihomirova Nadine Tung Cecilia M Dorfling Elizabeth J van Rensburg Susan L Neuhausen Yuan Chun Ding Anne-Marie Gerdes Bent Ejlertsen Finn C Nielsen Thomas Vo Hansen Ana Osorio Javier Benitez Raquel Andrés Conejero Ena Segota Jeffrey N Weitzel Margo Thelander Paolo Peterlongo Paolo Radice Valeria Pensotti Riccardo Dolcetti Bernardo Bonanni Bernard Peissel Daniela Zaffaroni Giulietta Scuvera Siranoush Manoukian Liliana Varesco Gabriele L Capone Laura Papi Laura Ottini Drakoulis Yannoukakos Irene Konstantopoulou Judy Garber Ute Hamann Alan Donaldson Angela Brady Carole Brewer Claire Foo D Gareth Evans Debra Frost Diana Eccles Fiona Douglas Jackie Cook Julian Adlard Julian Barwell Lisa Walker Louise Izatt Lucy E Side M John Kennedy Marc Tischkowitz Mark T Rogers Mary E Porteous Patrick J Morrison Radka Platte Ros Eeles Rosemarie Davidson Shirley Hodgson Trevor Cole Andrew K Godwin Claudine Isaacs Kathleen Claes Kim De Leeneer Alfons Meindl Andrea Gehrig Barbara Wappenschmidt Christian Sutter Christoph Engel Dieter Niederacher Doris Steinemann Hansjoerg Plendl Karin Kast Kerstin Rhiem Nina Ditsch Norbert Arnold Raymonda Varon-Mateeva Rita K Schmutzler Sabine Preisler-Adams Nadja Bogdanova Markov Shan Wang-Gohrke Antoine de Pauw Cédrick Lefol Christine Lasset Dominique Leroux Etienne Rouleau Francesca Damiola Hélène Dreyfus Laure Barjhoux Lisa Golmard Nancy Uhrhammer Valérie Bonadona Valérie Sornin Yves-Jean Bignon Jonathan Carter Linda Van Le Marion Piedmonte Paul A DiSilvestro Miguel de la Hoya Trinidad Caldes Heli Nevanlinna Kristiina Aittomäki Agnes Jager Ans Mw van den Ouweland Carolien M Kets Cora M Aalfs Flora E van Leeuwen Frans Bl Hogervorst Hanne Ej Meijers-Heijboer Jan C Oosterwijk Kees Ep van Roozendaal Matti A Rookus Peter Devilee Rob B van der Luijt Edith Olah Orland Diez Alex Teulé Conxi Lazaro Ignacio Blanco Jesús Del Valle Anna Jakubowska Grzegorz Sukiennicki Jacek Gronwald Jan Lubinski Katarzyna Durda Katarzyna Jaworska-Bieniek Bjarni A Agnarsson Christine Maugard Alberto Amadori Marco Montagna Manuel R Teixeira Amanda B Spurdle William Foulkes Curtis Olswold Noralane M Lindor Vernon S Pankratz Csilla I Szabo Anne Lincoln Lauren Jacobs Marina Corines Mark Robson Joseph Vijai Andreas Berger Anneliese Fink-Retter Christian F Singer Christine Rappaport Daphne Geschwantler Kaulich Georg Pfeiler Muy-Kheng Tea Mark H Greene Phuong L Mai Gad Rennert Evgeny N Imyanitov Anna Marie Mulligan Gord Glendon Irene L Andrulis Sandrine Tchatchou Amanda Ewart Toland Inge Sokilde Pedersen Mads Thomassen Torben A Kruse Uffe Birk Jensen Maria A Caligo Eitan Friedman Jamal Zidan Yael Laitman Annika Lindblom Beatrice Melin Brita Arver Niklas Loman Richard Rosenquist Olufunmilayo I Olopade Robert L Nussbaum Susan J Ramus Katherine L Nathanson Susan M Domchek Timothy R Rebbeck Banu K Arun Gillian Mitchell Beth Y Karlan Jenny Lester Sandra Orsulic Dominique Stoppa-Lyonnet Gilles Thomas Jacques Simard Fergus J Couch Kenneth Offit Douglas F Easton Georgia Chenevix-Trench Antonis C Antoniou Sylvie Mazoyer Catherine M Phelan Olga M Sinilnikova David G Cox

Breast Cancer Res 2015 Apr 25;17:61. Epub 2015 Apr 25.

INSERM U1052, CNRS UMR5286, Université Lyon 1, Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de Lyon, Lyon, France.

Introduction: Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are mitochondria. Mitochondrial genome variations affect electron transport chain efficiency and reactive oxygen species production. Individuals with different mitochondrial haplogroups differ in their metabolism and sensitivity to oxidative stress. Variability in mitochondrial genetic background can alter reactive oxygen species production, leading to cancer risk. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial haplogroups modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

Methods: We genotyped 22,214 (11,421 affected, 10,793 unaffected) mutation carriers belonging to the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 for 129 mitochondrial polymorphisms using the iCOGS array. Haplogroup inference and association detection were performed using a phylogenetic approach. ALTree was applied to explore the reference mitochondrial evolutionary tree and detect subclades enriched in affected or unaffected individuals.

Results: We discovered that subclade T1a1 was depleted in affected BRCA2 mutation carriers compared with the rest of clade T (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.55; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34 to 0.88; P = 0.01). Compared with the most frequent haplogroup in the general population (that is, H and T clades), the T1a1 haplogroup has a HR of 0.62 (95% CI, 0.40 to 0.95; P = 0.03). We also identified three potential susceptibility loci, including G13708A/rs28359178, which has demonstrated an inverse association with familial breast cancer risk.

Conclusions: This study illustrates how original approaches such as the phylogeny-based method we used can empower classical molecular epidemiological studies aimed at identifying association or risk modification effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13058-015-0567-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4478717PMC
April 2015

Prediction of BRCA1 germ-line mutation status in patients with breast cancer using histoprognosis grade, MS110, Lys27H3, vimentin, and KI67.

Pathobiology 2013 23;80(5):219-27. Epub 2013 Apr 23.

Department of Cancer Genetics/CIC-P Inserm 9502, Paoli Calmettes Institute, University of Aix-Marseille II, Marseille, France.

Family structure, lack of reliable information, cost, and delay are usual concerns when deciding to perform BRCA analyses. Testing breast cancer tissues with four antibodies (MS110, lys27H3, vimentin, and KI67) in addition to grade evaluation enabled us to rapidly select patients for genetic testing identification. We constituted an initial breast cancer tissue microarray, considered as a learning set, comprising 27 BRCA1 and 81 sporadic tumors. A second independent validation set of 28 BRCA1 tumors was matched to 28 sporadic tumors using the same original conditions. We investigated morphological parameters and 21 markers by immunohistochemistry. A logistic regression model was used to select the minimal number of markers providing the best model to predict BRCA1 status. The model was applied to the validation set to estimate specificity and sensibility. In the initial set, univariate analyses identified 11 markers significantly associated with BRCA1 status. Then, the best multivariate model comprised only grade 3, MS110, Lys27H3, vimentin, and KI67. When applied to the validation set, BRCA1 tumors were correctly classified with a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 81%. The performance of this model was superior when compared to other profiles. This study offers a new rapid and cost-effective method for the prescreening of patients at high risk of being BRCA1 mutation carriers, to guide genetic testing, and finally to provide appropriate preventive measures, advice, and treatments including targeted therapy to patients and their families.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000339432DOI Listing
January 2014

A nonsynonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers.

Authors:
Yuan C Ding Lesley McGuffog Sue Healey Eitan Friedman Yael Laitman Shani- Paluch-Shimon Bella Kaufman Annelie Liljegren Annika Lindblom Håkan Olsson Ulf Kristoffersson Marie Stenmark-Askmalm Beatrice Melin Susan M Domchek Katherine L Nathanson Timothy R Rebbeck Anna Jakubowska Jan Lubinski Katarzyna Jaworska Katarzyna Durda Jacek Gronwald Tomasz Huzarski Cezary Cybulski Tomasz Byrski Ana Osorio Teresa Ramóny Cajal Alexandra V Stavropoulou Javier Benítez Ute Hamann Matti Rookus Cora M Aalfs Judith L de Lange Hanne E J Meijers-Heijboer Jan C Oosterwijk Christi J van Asperen Encarna B Gómez García Nicoline Hoogerbrugge Agnes Jager Rob B van der Luijt Douglas F Easton Susan Peock Debra Frost Steve D Ellis Radka Platte Elena Fineberg D Gareth Evans Fiona Lalloo Louise Izatt Ros Eeles Julian Adlard Rosemarie Davidson Diana Eccles Trevor Cole Jackie Cook Carole Brewer Marc Tischkowitz Andrew K Godwin Harsh Pathak Dominique Stoppa-Lyonnet Olga M Sinilnikova Sylvie Mazoyer Laure Barjhoux Mélanie Léoné Marion Gauthier-Villars Virginie Caux-Moncoutier Antoine de Pauw Agnès Hardouin Pascaline Berthet Hélène Dreyfus Sandra Fert Ferrer Marie-Agnès Collonge-Rame Johanna Sokolowska Saundra Buys Mary Daly Alex Miron Mary Beth Terry Wendy Chung Esther M John Melissa Southey David Goldgar Christian F Singer Muy-Kheng Maria Tea Daphne Gschwantler-Kaulich Anneliese Fink-Retter Thomas V O Hansen Bent Ejlertsen Oskar T Johannsson Kenneth Offit Kara Sarrel Mia M Gaudet Joseph Vijai Mark Robson Marion R Piedmonte Lesley Andrews David Cohn Leslie R DeMars Paul DiSilvestro Gustavo Rodriguez Amanda Ewart Toland Marco Montagna Simona Agata Evgeny Imyanitov Claudine Isaacs Ramunas Janavicius Conxi Lazaro Ignacio Blanco Susan J Ramus Lara Sucheston Beth Y Karlan Jenny Gross Patricia A Ganz Mary S Beattie Rita K Schmutzler Barbara Wappenschmidt Alfons Meindl Norbert Arnold Dieter Niederacher Sabine Preisler-Adams Dorotehea Gadzicki Raymonda Varon-Mateeva Helmut Deissler Andrea Gehrig Christian Sutter Karin Kast Heli Nevanlinna Kristiina Aittomäki Jacques Simard Amanda B Spurdle Jonathan Beesley Xiaoqing Chen Gail E Tomlinson Jeffrey Weitzel Judy E Garber Olufunmilayo I Olopade Wendy S Rubinstein Nadine Tung Joanne L Blum Steven A Narod Sean Brummel Daniel L Gillen Noralane Lindor Zachary Fredericksen Vernon S Pankratz Fergus J Couch Paolo Radice Paolo Peterlongo Mark H Greene Jennifer T Loud Phuong L Mai Irene L Andrulis Gord Glendon Hilmi Ozcelik Anne-Marie Gerdes Mads Thomassen Uffe Birk Jensen Anne-Bine Skytte Maria A Caligo Andrew Lee Georgia Chenevix-Trench Antonis C Antoniou Susan L Neuhausen

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2012 Aug 22;21(8):1362-70. Epub 2012 Jun 22.

Department of Population Sciences, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope, Duarte, California 91010, USA.

Background: We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated with breast cancer risk in a larger cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

Methods: IRS1 rs1801123, rs1330645, and rs1801278 were genotyped in samples from 36 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Data were analyzed by a retrospective cohort approach modeling the associations with breast and ovarian cancer risks simultaneously. Analyses were stratified by BRCA1 and BRCA2 status and mutation class in BRCA1 carriers.

Results: Rs1801278 (Gly972Arg) was associated with ovarian cancer risk for both BRCA1 (HR, 1.43; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06-1.92; P = 0.019) and BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.39-3.52, P = 0.0008). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, the breast cancer risk was higher in carriers with class II mutations than class I mutations (class II HR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.28-2.70; class I HR, 0.86; 95%CI, 0.69-1.09; P(difference), 0.0006). Rs13306465 was associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 class II mutation carriers (HR, 2.42; P = 0.03).

Conclusion: The IRS1 Gly972Arg single-nucleotide polymorphism, which affects insulin-like growth factor and insulin signaling, modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 class II mutation carriers.

Impact: These findings may prove useful for risk prediction for breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-12-0229DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3415567PMC
August 2012

Uptake of a randomized breast cancer prevention trial comparing letrozole to placebo in BRCA1/2 mutations carriers: the LIBER trial.

Fam Cancer 2012 Mar;11(1):77-84

Genetics and Cancer, University Hospital CHU Arnaud de Villeneuve, 371, Av G. Giraud, 34295, Montpellier Cedex 5, France.

Women with germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutations are considered as an extreme risk population for developing breast cancer. Prophylactic mastectomy provides a valid option to reduce such risk, impacting however, the quality of life. Medical prevention by aromatase inhibitor that has also recently shown to have preventive effect may thus be considered as an alternative. LIBER is an ongoing double-blind, randomized phase III trial to evaluate the efficacy of 5-year letrozole versus placebo to decrease breast cancer incidence in post-menopausal BRCA1/2 mutation carriers (NCT00673335). We present data on the uptake of this trial. We compared characteristics of women in the LIBER trial (n = 113) to those of women enrolled in the prospective ongoing national GENEPSO cohort (n = 1,505). Uptake was evaluated through a survey sent to all active centres, with responses obtained from 17 to the 20 (85%) centres. According to the characteristics of the women enrolled in the GENEPSO cohort and the survey, approximately one-third of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers were eligible for the trial. Five hundred and thirty-four women eligible from chart review have been informed by mail about the prevention trial and were invited to an oral information by participating centres. Forty-four percentage of them came to the dedicated medical visit. Uptake of drug prevention trial was 32% among women informed orally and 15% of all the eligible women. The main reasons of refusal were: potential side effects, probability to receive the placebo and lack of support from their physicians. Additionally, we noticed that prior prophylactic oophorectomy and previous unilateral breast cancer were more frequent in women enrolled in the LIBER trial than in the French cohort (93% vs. 60% and 50% vs. 39%, respectively). Based on an overall 15% uptake among all eligible subjects, greater and wider information of the trial should be offered to women with BRCA1/2 mutation to improve recruitment. Women with previous unilateral breast cancer or prior prophylactic oophorectomy are more likely to enter a medical prevention trial.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10689-011-9484-4DOI Listing
March 2012

Molecular study of the perforin gene in familial hematological malignancies.

Hered Cancer Clin Pract 2011 Sep 21;9(1). Epub 2011 Sep 21.

Département d'Oncologie Génétique, de Prévention et Dépistage, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, 232 Boulevard Sainte Marguerite, Marseille, 13009, France.

Perforin gene (PRF1) mutations have been identified in some patients diagnosed with the familial form of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) and in patients with lymphoma. The aim of the present study was to determine whether patients with a familial aggregation of hematological malignancies harbor germline perforin gene mutations. For this purpose, 81 unrelated families from Tunisia and France with aggregated hematological malignancies were investigated. The variants detected in the PRF1 coding region amounted to 3.7% (3/81). Two of the three variants identified were previously described: the p.Ala91Val pathogenic mutation and the p.Asn252Ser polymorphism. A new p.Ala 211Val missense substitution was identified in two related Tunisian patients. In order to assess the pathogenicity of this new variation, bioinformatic tools were used to predict its effects on the perforin protein structure and at the mRNA level. The segregation of the mutant allele was studied in the family of interest and a control population was screened. The fact that this variant was not found to occur in 200 control chromosomes suggests that it may be pathogenic. However, overexpression of mutated PRF1 in rat basophilic leukemia cells did not affect the lytic function of perforin differently from the wild type protein.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1897-4287-9-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3197553PMC
September 2011

Common genetic variation at BARD1 is not associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2011 May 10;20(5):1032-8. Epub 2011 Mar 10.

QueenslanInstitute for Medical Research, Brisbane, Australia.

Background: Inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutations confer elevated breast cancer risk. Knowledge of factors that can improve breast cancer risk assessment in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers may improve personalized cancer prevention strategies.

Methods: A cohort of 5,546 BRCA1 and 2,865 BRCA2 mutation carriers was used to evaluate risk of breast cancer associated with BARD1 Cys557Ser. In a second nonindependent cohort of 1,537 of BRCA1 and 839 BRCA2 mutation carriers, BARD1 haplotypes were also evaluated.

Results: The BARD1 Cys557Ser variant was not significantly associated with risk of breast cancer from single SNP analysis, with a pooled effect estimate of 0.90 (95% CI: 0.71-1.15) in BRCA1 carriers and 0.87 (95% CI: 0.59-1.29) in BRCA2 carriers. Further analysis of haplotypes at BARD1 also revealed no evidence that additional common genetic variation not captured by Cys557Ser was associated with breast cancer risk.

Conclusion: Evidence to date does not support a role for BARD1 variation, including the Cy557Ser variant, as a modifier of risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

Impact: Interactors of BRCA1/2 have been implicated as modifiers of BRCA1/2-associated cancer risk. Our finding that BARD1 does not contribute to this risk modification may focus research on other genes that do modify BRCA1/2-associated cancer risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-10-0909DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3089675PMC
May 2011

Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: implications for risk prediction.

Authors:
Antonis C Antoniou Jonathan Beesley Lesley McGuffog Olga M Sinilnikova Sue Healey Susan L Neuhausen Yuan Chun Ding Timothy R Rebbeck Jeffrey N Weitzel Henry T Lynch Claudine Isaacs Patricia A Ganz Gail Tomlinson Olufunmilayo I Olopade Fergus J Couch Xianshu Wang Noralane M Lindor Vernon S Pankratz Paolo Radice Siranoush Manoukian Bernard Peissel Daniela Zaffaroni Monica Barile Alessandra Viel Anna Allavena Valentina Dall'Olio Paolo Peterlongo Csilla I Szabo Michal Zikan Kathleen Claes Bruce Poppe Lenka Foretova Phuong L Mai Mark H Greene Gad Rennert Flavio Lejbkowicz Gord Glendon Hilmi Ozcelik Irene L Andrulis Mads Thomassen Anne-Marie Gerdes Lone Sunde Dorthe Cruger Uffe Birk Jensen Maria Caligo Eitan Friedman Bella Kaufman Yael Laitman Roni Milgrom Maya Dubrovsky Shimrit Cohen Ake Borg Helena Jernström Annika Lindblom Johanna Rantala Marie Stenmark-Askmalm Beatrice Melin Kate Nathanson Susan Domchek Ania Jakubowska Jan Lubinski Tomasz Huzarski Ana Osorio Adriana Lasa Mercedes Durán Maria-Isabel Tejada Javier Godino Javier Benitez Ute Hamann Mieke Kriege Nicoline Hoogerbrugge Rob B van der Luijt Christi J van Asperen Peter Devilee E J Meijers-Heijboer Marinus J Blok Cora M Aalfs Frans Hogervorst Matti Rookus Margaret Cook Clare Oliver Debra Frost Don Conroy D Gareth Evans Fiona Lalloo Gabriella Pichert Rosemarie Davidson Trevor Cole Jackie Cook Joan Paterson Shirley Hodgson Patrick J Morrison Mary E Porteous Lisa Walker M John Kennedy Huw Dorkins Susan Peock Andrew K Godwin Dominique Stoppa-Lyonnet Antoine de Pauw Sylvie Mazoyer Valérie Bonadona Christine Lasset Hélène Dreyfus Dominique Leroux Agnès Hardouin Pascaline Berthet Laurence Faivre Catherine Loustalot Tetsuro Noguchi Hagay Sobol Etienne Rouleau Catherine Nogues Marc Frénay Laurence Vénat-Bouvet John L Hopper Mary B Daly Mary B Terry Esther M John Saundra S Buys Yosuf Yassin Alexander Miron David Goldgar Christian F Singer Anne Catharina Dressler Daphne Gschwantler-Kaulich Georg Pfeiler Thomas V O Hansen Lars Jønson Bjarni A Agnarsson Tomas Kirchhoff Kenneth Offit Vincent Devlin Ana Dutra-Clarke Marion Piedmonte Gustavo C Rodriguez Katie Wakeley John F Boggess Jack Basil Peter E Schwartz Stephanie V Blank Amanda Ewart Toland Marco Montagna Cinzia Casella Evgeny Imyanitov Laima Tihomirova Ignacio Blanco Conxi Lazaro Susan J Ramus Lara Sucheston Beth Y Karlan Jenny Gross Rita Schmutzler Barbara Wappenschmidt Christoph Engel Alfons Meindl Magdalena Lochmann Norbert Arnold Simone Heidemann Raymonda Varon-Mateeva Dieter Niederacher Christian Sutter Helmut Deissler Dorothea Gadzicki Sabine Preisler-Adams Karin Kast Ines Schönbuchner Trinidad Caldes Miguel de la Hoya Kristiina Aittomäki Heli Nevanlinna Jacques Simard Amanda B Spurdle Helene Holland Xiaoqing Chen Radka Platte Georgia Chenevix-Trench Douglas F Easton

Cancer Res 2010 Dec 30;70(23):9742-54. Epub 2010 Nov 30.

Center for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.

The known breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, and 2q35 confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of 3 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs6504950 in STXBP4/COX11, and rs10941679 at 5p12, and reanalyzed the previous associations using additional carriers in a sample of 12,525 BRCA1 and 7,409 BRCA2 carriers. Additionally, we investigated potential interactions between SNPs and assessed the implications for risk prediction. The minor alleles of rs4973768 and rs10941679 were associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 carriers (per-allele HR = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.03-1.18, P = 0.006 and HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.01-1.19, P = 0.03, respectively). Neither SNP was associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 carriers, and rs6504950 was not associated with breast cancer for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers. Of the 9 polymorphisms investigated, 7 were associated with breast cancer for BRCA2 carriers (FGFR2, TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, 2q35, SLC4A7, 5p12, P = 7 × 10(-11) - 0.03), but only TOX3 and 2q35 were associated with the risk for BRCA1 carriers (P = 0.0049, 0.03, respectively). All risk-associated polymorphisms appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk for mutation carriers. Based on the joint genotype distribution of the 7 risk-associated SNPs in BRCA2 mutation carriers, the 5% of BRCA2 carriers at highest risk (i.e., between 95th and 100th percentiles) were predicted to have a probability between 80% and 96% of developing breast cancer by age 80, compared with 42% to 50% for the 5% of carriers at lowest risk. Our findings indicated that these risk differences might be sufficient to influence the clinical management of mutation carriers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-1907DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2999830PMC
December 2010

Association of the variants CASP8 D302H and CASP10 V410I with breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2010 Nov 26;19(11):2859-68. Epub 2010 Oct 26.

Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.

Background: The genes caspase-8 (CASP8) and caspase-10 (CASP10) functionally cooperate and play a key role in the initiation of apoptosis. Suppression of apoptosis is one of the major mechanisms underlying the origin and progression of cancer. Previous case-control studies have indicated that the polymorphisms CASP8 D302H and CASP10 V410I are associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population.

Methods: To evaluate whether the CASP8 D302H (CASP10 V410I) polymorphisms modify breast or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, we analyzed 7,353 (7,227) subjects of white European origin provided by 19 (18) study groups that participate in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). A weighted cohort approach was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI).

Results: The minor allele of CASP8 D302H was significantly associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer (per-allele HR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.76-0.97; P(trend) = 0.011) and ovarian cancer (per-allele HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.53-0.89; P(trend) = 0.004) for BRCA1 but not for BRCA2 mutation carriers. The CASP10 V410I polymorphism was not associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers.

Conclusions: CASP8 D302H decreases breast and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers but not for BRCA2 mutation carriers.

Impact: The combined application of these and other recently identified genetic risk modifiers could in the future allow better individual risk calculation and could aid in the individualized counseling and decision making with respect to preventive options in BRCA1 mutation carriers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-10-0517DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3077716PMC
November 2010

Time to prophylactic surgery in BRCA1/2 carriers depends on psychological and other characteristics.

Genet Med 2010 Dec;12(12):801-7

INSERM, UMR912, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille, France.

Purpose: To investigate the medical and psychosocial factors determining the time to prophylactic surgery of unaffected women carriers of a deleterious BRCA1/2 mutation.

Methods: Prospective study on a French national cohort of unaffected BRCA1/2 carriers (N = 244); multivariate Cox proportional hazard modeling.

Results: Median follow-up time was 2.33 years (range, 0.04-6.84 years). Time to surgery was shorter when the psychological impact of BRCA1/2 result disclosure was stated to be higher (P ≤ 0.01). Those who intended to opt for prophylactic surgery before being tested did so faster and more frequently after test disclosure than those who were undecided/opposed. The older the women were, the faster their uptake of risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (adjusted hazard ratio >2.95; P < 0.001) was; the uptake of those with at least two children was also faster (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.51; [1.38-4.55]). Those who opted most quickly for risk-reducing mastectomy more frequently had a younger child at the time of testing (adjusted hazard ratio = 4.63 [1.56-13.74]). Time to surgery was shorter when there was a first-degree relative with ovarian/breast cancer (P ≤ 0.01).

Conclusion: Time to prophylactic surgery depends on the stated psychological impact of disclosure and on women's cognitive anticipation of surgery after adjusting on sociodemographic characteristics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GIM.0b013e3181f48d1cDOI Listing
December 2010

Breast radiotherapy in the lateral decubitus position: A technique to prevent lung and heart irradiation.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2005 Apr;61(5):1348-54

Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Curie, Paris, France.

Purpose: To present an original technique for breast radiotherapy, with the aim of limiting lung and heart irradiation, satisfying quality assurance criteria.

Methods And Material: An original radiotherapy technique for breast irradiation has been developed at the Institute Curie in January 1996. It consists of isocentric breast irradiation in the lateral decubitus position (isocentric lateral decubitus [ILD]). This technique is indicated for voluminous or pendulous breasts needing breast irradiation only. Thin carbon fiber supports and special patient positioning devices have been developed especially for this technique. In vivo measurements were performed to check the dose distribution before the routine use of the technique.

Results: ILD has been successfully implemented in routine practice, and 500 patients have been already treated. Breast radiotherapy is performed using a dose of 50 Gy at ICRU point in 25 fractions. ILD shows good homogeneity of the dose in breast treatment volume, treatment fields are perpendicular to the skin ensuring its protection, and extremely low dose is delivered to the underlying lung and heart.

Conclusion: In cases of voluminous breasts or patients with a history of lung and heart disease, our technique provides several advantages over the conventional technique with opposing tangential fields. This technique improves the dose homogeneity according to the ICRU recommendations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2004.08.051DOI Listing
April 2005