Publications by authors named "Helen J Temple"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A metric for spatially explicit contributions to science-based species targets.

Nat Ecol Evol 2021 06 8;5(6):836-844. Epub 2021 Apr 8.

IUCN, Cambridge, UK.

The Convention on Biological Diversity's post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework will probably include a goal to stabilize and restore the status of species. Its delivery would be facilitated by making the actions required to halt and reverse species loss spatially explicit. Here, we develop a species threat abatement and restoration (STAR) metric that is scalable across species, threats and geographies. STAR quantifies the contributions that abating threats and restoring habitats in specific places offer towards reducing extinction risk. While every nation can contribute towards halting biodiversity loss, Indonesia, Colombia, Mexico, Madagascar and Brazil combined have stewardship over 31% of total STAR values for terrestrial amphibians, birds and mammals. Among actions, sustainable crop production and forestry dominate, contributing 41% of total STAR values for these taxonomic groups. Key Biodiversity Areas cover 9% of the terrestrial surface but capture 47% of STAR values. STAR could support governmental and non-state actors in quantifying their contributions to meeting science-based species targets within the framework.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41559-021-01432-0DOI Listing
June 2021

The genomics of insecticide resistance: insights from recent studies in African malaria vectors.

Curr Opin Insect Sci 2018 06 5;27:111-115. Epub 2018 Jun 5.

Big Data Institute, Oxford OX3 7FZ, United Kingdom.

Over 80% of the world's population is at risk from arthropod-vectored diseases, and arthropod crop pests are a significant threat to food security. Insecticides are our front-line response for controlling these disease vectors and pests, and consequently the increasing prevalence of insecticide resistance is of global concern. Here we provide a brief overview of how genomics can be used to implement effective insecticide resistance management (IRM), with a focus on recent advances in the study of Anopheles gambiae, the major vector of malaria in Africa. These advances unlock the potential for a predictive form of IRM, allowing tractable feedback for stakeholders, where the latest field data and well parameterised models can maximise the lifetime and effectiveness of available insecticides.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cois.2018.05.017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6060083PMC
June 2018

The impact of conservation on the status of the world's vertebrates.

Science 2010 Dec 26;330(6010):1503-9. Epub 2010 Oct 26.

IUCN SSC Species Survival Commission, c/o United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre, 219 Huntingdon Road, Cambridge CB3 0DL, UK.

Using data for 25,780 species categorized on the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List, we present an assessment of the status of the world's vertebrates. One-fifth of species are classified as Threatened, and we show that this figure is increasing: On average, 52 species of mammals, birds, and amphibians move one category closer to extinction each year. However, this overall pattern conceals the impact of conservation successes, and we show that the rate of deterioration would have been at least one-fifth again as much in the absence of these. Nonetheless, current conservation efforts remain insufficient to offset the main drivers of biodiversity loss in these groups: agricultural expansion, logging, overexploitation, and invasive alien species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1194442DOI Listing
December 2010

The status of the world's land and marine mammals: diversity, threat, and knowledge.

Science 2008 Oct;322(5899):225-30

International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Species Programme, IUCN, 28 Rue Mauverney, 1196 Gland, Switzerland.

Knowledge of mammalian diversity is still surprisingly disparate, both regionally and taxonomically. Here, we present a comprehensive assessment of the conservation status and distribution of the world's mammals. Data, compiled by 1700+ experts, cover all 5487 species, including marine mammals. Global macroecological patterns are very different for land and marine species but suggest common mechanisms driving diversity and endemism across systems. Compared with land species, threat levels are higher among marine mammals, driven by different processes (accidental mortality and pollution, rather than habitat loss), and are spatially distinct (peaking in northern oceans, rather than in Southeast Asia). Marine mammals are also disproportionately poorly known. These data are made freely available to support further scientific developments and conservation action.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1165115DOI Listing
October 2008
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