Publications by authors named "Heike Aupperle-Lellbach"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Letter regarding "ACVIM consensus statement on pancreatitis in cats".

J Vet Intern Med 2021 Jul 21;35(4):1644-1645. Epub 2021 May 21.

LABOKLIN GmbH & Co. KG, Bad Kissingen, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jvim.16168DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8295669PMC
July 2021

Evaluating the Histologic Grade of Digital Squamous Cell Carcinomas in Dogs with Dark and Light Haircoat-A Comparative Study of the Invasive Front and Tumor Cell Budding Systems.

Vet Sci 2020 Dec 30;8(1). Epub 2020 Dec 30.

Pathology Department, LABOKLIN GmbH & Co. KG, 97688 Bad Kissingen, Germany.

Canine digital squamous cell carcinomas (CDSCC) are particularly aggressive when compared to their occurrence in other locations. Although these neoplasms are more frequently seen in dark-haired dogs, such as Giant Schnauzers, there are no data checking whether these tumors are histologically different between breeds. We histologically evaluated DSCC from 94 dogs. These were divided into two groups, namely, (1) dark-haired (N = 76) and (2) light-haired breeds (N = 18), further subdividing Group 1 into three subgroups, (1a) black breeds ( = 11), (1b) Schnauzers ( = 34) and (1c) black & tan breeds ( = 31). Adaptations from two different squamous cell carcinomas grading schemes from human and veterinary literature were used. Both systems showed significant differences when compared to Groups 1 and 2 in terms of final grade, invasive front keratinization, degree of invasion, nuclear pleomorphism, tumor cell budding, smallest tumor nest size and amount of tumor stroma. Group 2 was consistently better differentiated CDSCC than Group 1. However, there were no significant differences among the dark-haired breeds in any of the features evaluated. This study represents the first attempt to grade CDSCC while taking into account both phenotypical and presumptive genotypical haircoat color. In conclusion, CDSCC are not only more common in dark-haired dogs, they are also histologically more aggressive.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/vetsci8010003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7824281PMC
December 2020

Do Canine Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms Resemble Human Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours? A Comparative Morphological and Immunohistochemical Investigation.

J Comp Pathol 2020 Nov 17;181:73-85. Epub 2020 Nov 17.

Institute of Pathology, School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany.

Although canine pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs) have been proposed as a model for the counterpart human neoplasms, the type or grade of human PanNEN that they resemble is unclear. PanNENs in animals are classified as adenoma or carcinoma, whereas in humans they are classified as pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (PanNET) if well-differentiated, or as pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (PanNEC) if poorly differentiated. We evaluated 16 canine primary PanNENs and two metastases histologically and immunohistochemically, and graded them using the animal and human grading systems. All neoplasms had local or vascular invasion and were classified as pancreatic islet cell carcinomas according to the current WHO classification. The Ki-67 index was low in all cases (0.01-1.50%). All had cytoplasmic expression of synaptophysin and insulin but were immunonegative for glucagon, confirming a functional diagnosis of canine insulinoma. Membranous expression of SSTR2A and nuclear expression of ATRX, but no p53 expression, was found in all neoplasms. One primary tumour was diagnosed as a mixed neuroendocrine-non-neuroendocrine neoplasm, which is the first report of this neoplasm in dogs. The other 15 primary tumours and both metastatic tumours were graded as PanNET G1, according to the human WHO classification. We conclude that canine PanNENs share well-differentiated histomorphology, SSTR2A expression and absence of nuclear p53 immunolabelling with human PanNETs G1. However, they differ in ATRX gene expression and functionality, and seem to have a worse prognosis than human PanNETs G1, although their generally low Ki-67 index precludes more precise assessment of prognosis. Membranous SSTR2A expression renders canine PanNENs potentially amenable to treatment with somatostatin analogues or SSTR targeted in-vivo imaging methods.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcpa.2020.10.001DOI Listing
November 2020

Veterinary Diagnostic Approach of Common Virus Diseases in Adult Honeybees.

Vet Sci 2020 Oct 21;7(4). Epub 2020 Oct 21.

VETIDATA, Institute of Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Leipzig University, an den Tierkliniken 39, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.

Veterinarians are educated in prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases in various vertebrate species. As they are familiar with multifactorial health problems in single animals as well as in herd health management, their knowledge and skills can be beneficial for the beekeepers and honeybee health. However, in education and in practice, honeybees are not a common species for most veterinarians and the typical veterinary diagnostic methods such as blood sampling or auscultation are not applicable to the superorganism honeybee. Honeybee colonies may be affected by various biotic and abiotic factors. Among the infectious agents, RNA-viruses build the largest group, causing covert and overt infections in honeybee colonies which may lead to colony losses. Veterinarians could and should play a more substantial role in managing honeybee health-not limited to cases of notifiable diseases and official hygiene controls. This review discusses the veterinary diagnostic approach to adult bee examination with a special focus on diagnosis and differential diagnosis of the common virus diseases Acute Bee Paralysis Virus (ABPV)-Kashmir Bee Virus (KBV)-Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV)-Complex, Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus (CBPV) and Deformed Wing Virus (DWV), as well as coinfections like spp. and spp.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/vetsci7040159DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7711501PMC
October 2020

Challenges in microbiological identification of aerobic bacteria isolated from the skin of reptiles.

PLoS One 2020 19;15(10):e0240085. Epub 2020 Oct 19.

Clinic for Birds and Reptiles, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.

Introduction: Bacterial pathogens are often involved in dermatitis in reptiles. Exact identification of reptile-specific but otherwise uncommon bacterial species may be challenging. However, identification is crucial to evaluate the importance of the detected bacterial species.

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the number of aerobic bacterial isolates cultured from skin-derived samples of reptiles which were not reliably identified by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), and to determine their identity.

Material And Methods: Routine bacterial diagnostics were performed on 235 skin samples, and 417 bacterial isolates were analysed by MALDI-TOF MS. The isolates were grouped into categories based on their first score: category I (≥ 2.00), category II (≥ 1.70 and < 2.00), and category III (< 1.70). Isolates from category III were further investigated by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and the following criteria were applied: query cover 100%, e-value rounded to 0.0 and sequence identity (%) > 98.00% for genus identification, and > 99.00% for species identification.

Results: The majority of bacterial isolates were in category I (85.1%) or category II (8.4%). In category III (6.5%) results achieved at first by MALDI-TOF MS corresponded to the results of the molecular analysis in 8.0% of isolates at the species level and in 24.0% at the genus level. Bacterial isolates classified as category III were heterogenic in genus (e.g. Chryseobacterium, Devriesea, Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus, Uruburuella), and some have only been described in reptiles so far.

Conclusions: Most of the aerobic bacterial isolates cultured from reptile skin achieved high scores by MALDI-TOF MS. However, in the majority of category III isolates MALDI-TOF MS results were different from those of the molecular analysis. This strengthens the need to carefully examine low-scored results for plausibility and to be familiar with the occurrence and morphology of relevant reptile-specific bacterial species (e.g. Devriesea agamarum) as well as with the limits of the database used.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0240085PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7571677PMC
November 2020

Overt Infection with Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus (CBPV) in Two Honey Bee Colonies.

Vet Sci 2020 Sep 22;7(3). Epub 2020 Sep 22.

VETIDATA, Institute of Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Leipzig University, An den Tierkliniken 39, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.

Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus (CBPV), a widespread honey bee RNA virus, causes massive worker bee losses, mostly in strong colonies. Two different syndromes, with paralysis, ataxia and flight incapacity on one hand and black hairless individuals with shortened abdomens on the other, can affect a colony simultaneously. This case report presents two colonies with symptoms of paralysis and hairless black syndrome in 2019. Via RT-PCR, a highly positive result for CBPV was detected in both samples. Further problems, such as a infection and infestation, were present in these colonies. Therapy methods were applied to colony 1 comprising queen replacement, shook swarm method and control, whereas colony 2 was asphyxiated after queen loss and colony weakening. After therapy, colony 1 was wintered without symptoms. Beekeeping and sanitary measures can save a CBPV-infected colony, while further complications result in total colony loss.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/vetsci7030142DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7559786PMC
September 2020

Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes in Pet Rabbit Mammary Carcinomas: A Study with Relevance to Comparative Pathology.

Animals (Basel) 2020 Aug 17;10(8). Epub 2020 Aug 17.

Institute of Veterinary Pathology, University of Leipzig, An den Tierkliniken, 04109 Leipzig, Germany.

Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) serve as prognostic biomarker in human breast cancer. Rabbits have the potential to act as animal model for human breast cancer, and close similarities exist between the rabbit and human immune system. The aim of this study is to characterize TILs in pet rabbit mammary carcinomas and to statistically correlate results with histological and immunohistochemical tumor characteristics. Microscopic evaluation of TILs was performed in hematoxylin and eosin stained sections of 107 rabbit mammary carcinomas according to international guidelines for human breast cancer. Data on histological features of malignancy, estrogen and progesterone receptor status and calponin expression were obtained from the data base. This study revealed a statistical association between stromal TILs in the central tumor (CT) and infiltrative margin. Higher maximal percentages of stromal TILs at the CT were statistically correlated with decreased mitotic count and lower tumor grade. An increased number of calponin positive tumor cells was statistically associated with a lower mitotic count and a higher percentage of stromal TILs. Results suggest that higher percentages of stromal TILs are useful biomarkers that may point toward a favorable prognosis in rabbit mammary carcinomas and support the concept of the use of rabbits for translational research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ani10081437DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7459912PMC
August 2020

Histopathological findings and canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity in normal dogs and dogs with inflammatory and neoplastic diseases of the pancreas.

J Vet Intern Med 2020 May 7;34(3):1127-1134. Epub 2020 May 7.

Laboklin GmbH & Co KG, Bad Kissingen, Germany.

Background: Diagnosis of pancreatic diseases in dogs is still challenging because of variable clinical signs, which do not always correspond with clinical pathology and histopathological findings.

Objectives: To characterize inflammatory and neoplastic pancreatic diseases of dogs and to correlate these findings with clinical findings and canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (cPLI) results.

Animals: Tissue specimens and corresponding blood samples from 72 dogs submitted for routine diagnostic testing.

Methods: Four groups were defined histologically: (1) normal pancreas (n = 40), (2) mild pancreatitis (n = 8), (3) moderate or severe pancreatitis (acute, n = 11; chronic, n = 1), and (4) pancreatic neoplasms (n = 12). An in-house cPLI ELISA (<180 μg/L, normal; >310 μg/L, pancreatitis) was performed.

Results: In dogs with normal pancreas, 92.5% of serum cPLI results were within the reference range and significantly lower than in dogs with mild acute pancreatitis, moderate or severe acute pancreatitis and pancreatic tumors. In dogs with moderate or severe acute pancreatitis, cPLI sensitivity was 90.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 58.7%-99.8%). Most dogs (9/12) with pancreatic tumors (group 4) had additional pancreatic inflammation and cPLI results were increased in 10 dogs.

Conclusions And Clinical Importance: High cPLI indicates serious acute pancreatitis but underlying pancreatic neoplasms should also be taken into consideration. This study confirms the relevance of histopathology in the diagnostic evaluation of pancreatic diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jvim.15779DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7255677PMC
May 2020

Clinical and Pathological Data of 17 Non-Epithelial Pancreatic Tumors in Cats.

Vet Sci 2020 Apr 27;7(2). Epub 2020 Apr 27.

LABOKLIN GmbH & Co. KG, 97688 Bad Kissingen, Germany.

Tumors of mesenchymal origin are rarely reported in the pancreas. Therefore, this study characterized 17 feline non-epithelial pancreatic tumors, including clinical data, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry. Seventeen feline pancreatic tissue samples were investigated histopathologically and immunohistochemically. Selected pancreatic and inflammatory serum parameters, e.g., feline pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (fPLI), 1,2-o-dilauryl-rac-glycero-3-glutaric acid-(6'-methylresorufin) ester (DGGR) lipase and serum amyloid A (SAA), were recorded, when available. The neoplasms were characterized as round (n = 13) or spindle (n = 4) cell tumors. Round cell tumors included 12 lymphomas and one mast cell tumor in ectopic splenic tissue within the pancreas. Lymphomas were of T-cell (n = 9) or B-cell (n = 3) origin. These cats showed leukocytosis (3/3) and increased fPLI (5/5), DGGR lipase (3/5) and SAA (4/5) values. Spindle cell tumors included two hemangiosarcomas, one pleomorphic sarcoma and one fibrosarcoma. The cat with pleomorphic sarcoma showed increased SAA value. Overall survival time was two weeks to seven months. These are the first descriptions of a pancreatic pleomorphic sarcoma and a mast cell tumor in accessory spleens within feline pancreas. Although rare, pancreatic tumors should be considered in cats presenting with clinical signs and clinical pathology changes of pancreatitis. Only histopathology can certainly distinguish solitary pancreatitis from a neoplasm with inflammation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/vetsci7020055DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7356899PMC
April 2020

[Aerobic bacteria from skin lesions in reptiles and their antimicrobial susceptibility].

Tierarztl Prax Ausg K Kleintiere Heimtiere 2020 Apr 23;48(2):78-88. Epub 2020 Apr 23.

LABOKLIN GmbH & Co. KG, Bad Kissingen.

Objective: Bacterial skin infections are common in reptiles. Although many such infections are influenced by multifactorial problems, specific treatment of bacterial infections is an important consideration. The objective of this study was to evaluate the range of aerobic bacteria in skin lesions of reptiles and to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility.

Material And Methods: Swabs of skin lesions from 219 reptiles were cultured for aerobic bacteria between January 2017 and June 2018. Isolates were identified based on growth on selective agar plates, biochemical parameters, as well as MALDI-TOF MS. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was carried out using the microdilution method.

Results: A total of 306 isolates were identified, mostly gram-negative, including spp. (n = 48), spp. (n = 31, only in chelonians), aerobic spore-forming bacteria (n = 30), spp. (n = 20), spp. (n = 20), spp. (n = 15), spp. (n = 15), spp. (n = 13), spp. (n = 13), spp. (n = 11) as well as 78 other gram-negative and 12 other gram-positive bacteria. Colonization with 2 (n = 80) or more (n = 16) bacterial isolates was seen in 96 animals. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was carried out with 208 of the 306 isolated bacteria. Many isolates were sensitive (minimal inhibitory concentration [MIC] in µg/ml ≤ breakpoint) to enro- (E) and marbofloxacin (M): 86.4 % MIC ≤ 0.5 (E) and 95.5 % MIC ≤ 1 (M) for spp., 86.4 % MIC ≤ 0.5 (E) and 90.9 % MIC ≤ 1 (M) for spp., 75.0 % MIC ≤ 0.5 (E) and 100 % MIC ≤ 1 (M) for spp. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazol proved to be effective against most of the spp. (90.9 % MIC ≤ 2/38) and spp. (75.0 % MIC ≤ 2/38). Amikacin was effective against nearly all spp. (97.7 % MIC ≤ 16), spp. (95.5 % MIC ≤ 16) and spp. (93.8 % MIC ≤ 16).

Conclusion And Clinical Relevance: The majority of isolates were gram-negative; the clinical relevance of individual isolates must, however, be evaluated on a case by case basis. Many of the isolated bacteria were sensitive to fluoroquinolones as well as aminoglycosides. Susceptibility testing is recommended since use of these antibiotics should be limited and for every tested group of antibiotics resistant isolates were found.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-1115-7907DOI Listing
April 2020

[Detection of BRAF mutation in canine prostatic diseases].

Tierarztl Prax Ausg K Kleintiere Heimtiere 2019 Oct 18;47(5):313-320. Epub 2019 Oct 18.

Institut für Tierpathologie, Freie Universität Berlin.

Objective: In the literature, the BRAF mutation is reported to have been identified in 80 % of the examined canine prostate carcinomas (PCa). The objectives of this study were to test for the BRAF mutation in canine PCa in our cohort of canine patients, to determine the specificity and sensitivity of the test for this mutation, as well as to identify the association between the presence of the BRAF mutation and the histologic picture of PCa. Moreover, the method was to be established in cytology samples.

Material And Methods: Biopsy samples (n = 70) and cytologic slides (n = 17) of 87 dogs with prostatic diseases were selected. Prostatic diseases were classified according to the literature as benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH, n = 22), prostatitis (n = 14), squamous cell metaplasia of the prostate (PM, n = 2), atrophy following castration (n = 3) und PCa (n = 46; histologic diagnosis n = 35, cytologic diagnosis n = 11). Additionally, the Gleason score was determined for each PCa. DNA isolation was performed using commercially available kits. Exon 15 was examined using the TaqMan SNP assay. The specificity and sensitivity of the test were calculated.

Results: A Gleason score of 6 and 7 was shown in 1 PCa each, in 33 cases the score ranged between 8 and 10. Sufficient amount of good-quality DNA was isolated from all samples. 28/46 PCa were tested positive for the BRAF mutation (sensitivity 61 %). The BRAF mutation was not evident in any of the dogs with BPH, prostatitis, PM or atrophy (specificity 100 %). PCa positive for the BRAF mutation exhibited a significantly higher Gleason score (p = 0.002) in comparison to PCa without this mutation.

Conclusion And Clinical Relevance: BRAF mutation analysis is a highly specific method and may aid in confirming the diagnosis of PCa in histologically and cytologically questionable cases. PCa positive for BRAF mutation exhibited more criteria of malignancy than PCa without this mutation. The clinical, therapeutic, and prognostic relevance of these findings needs to be evaluated by further studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-0987-8212DOI Listing
October 2019

Expression of Myoepithelial Markers in Mammary Carcinomas of 119 Pet Rabbits.

Animals (Basel) 2019 Sep 28;9(10). Epub 2019 Sep 28.

Targos Molecular Pathology GmbH, 34119 Kassel, Germany.

Most mammary tumors in pet rabbits are carcinomas; prognostic factors are unknown. The aim of this study on rabbit mammary carcinomas was to determine the expression of myoepithelial markers that have a prognostic relevance in human cancers. Mammary carcinomas ( = 119) of female or female-spayed pet rabbits were immunostained for cytokeratin AE1/AE3, vimentin, smooth muscle actin (SMA), and calponin; and percentages of non-neoplastic myoepithelial cells (ME cells) and calponin-positive neoplastic cells were determined. Using statistical analysis, data were correlated with the age of the rabbits and histological tumor characteristics. All carcinomas contained retained spindle-shaped ME, while 115 also contained hypertrophic ME (HME). A statistically significant relationship existed between a higher age and an increase in HME. In 111 carcinomas (93%), tumor cells expressed calponin. There was a significant correlation between higher percentages of calponin-positive tumor cells and a lower mitotic count, an increased percentage of tubular growth, and a lower grading score, respectively. Data suggest that pet rabbit mammary carcinomas develop from progression of in situ cancer and that the extent of calponin expression in tumor cells influences their biological behavior. These results provide the basis for a long-term follow-up on the prognostic significance of calponin expression in mammary cancer cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ani9100740DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6826665PMC
September 2019

[MRI in a dog with confirmed pseudorabies infection].

Tierarztl Prax Ausg K Kleintiere Heimtiere 2019 Aug 21;47(4):272-281. Epub 2019 Aug 21.

Tierklinik Dresdner Heide, Dresden.

We describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination in a dog with confirmed suid herpesvirus 1 (SHV-1) infection and compare the findings to the results of the histopathologic examination. A 5-year-old female German Hunting Terrier used for hunting displayed severe pruritus and fever 7 days after contact with a wild boar. Two days after the onset of the first disease symptoms, the dog was presented with seizures and hyperthermia. MRI examination revealed hyperintense alterations in the occipital, temporal and parietal lobe areas. In the contrast sequences, contrast enhancement of the medulla oblongata as well as of the pachy- and leptomeninges within the occipital lobe and the cerebellum could be detected. The bitch was euthanized because of the acute deterioration of its condition. Histopathologically, multifocal mild to moderate mixed cellular vasculitis and satellitosis were found in the brain stem and pons, where SHV-1 antigen was detectable immunohistochemically in neurons and glial cells. In molecular-biological studies of the trigeminal ganglion and the medulla oblongata, SHV-1-specific DNA was detected. The MRI lesions of our patient displayed marked differences to the changes described in the literature for central European tick-borne meningoencephalomyelitis or the paralytic course of rabies. By contrast, it appears that similarities to the lesions described in canine distemper and the encephalitic form of rabies did exist.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-0948-8760DOI Listing
August 2019

Correlation of BRAF Variant V595E, Breed, Histological Grade and Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Canine Transitional Cell Carcinomas.

Vet Sci 2019 Mar 19;6(1). Epub 2019 Mar 19.

Institute of Veterinary Pathology, Freie Universität Berlin, 14163 Berlin, Germany.

The presence of BRAF variant V595E, as well as an increased cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) are well-described in the literature. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between breed (terrier versus non-terrier dogs), histological grade, COX-2 expression, and BRAF mutation in canine TCC. Therefore, transmural TCC biopsies from 65 dogs (15 terriers, 50 non-terriers) were graded histologically into low- and high-grade. Immunohistochemical evaluation of the intensity of COX-2 expression was performed using an immunoreactive score (IRS). Exon 15 of chromosome 16 was examined for the BRAF variant c.1799T>A by TaqMan SNP assay. TCC was low-grade in 20 cases (one terrier, 19 non-terriers) and high-grade in 45 cases (14 terriers, 31 non-terriers). Contrary to humans, histological grade was not significantly correlated to the intensity of COX-2 expression. BRAF mutation was detected in 11/15 (73%) TCC of terriers and in 18/50 (36%) TCC of non-terriers. Histological grade and BRAF mutation were not correlated significantly ( = 0.2912). Terriers had a considerably higher prevalence of high-grade tumors ( < 0.0001), as well as of BRAF mutation ( ≤ 0.05) compared to non-terriers. In non-terriers, neoplasms with BRAF mutation showed a significantly higher intensity of COX-2 expression than those without BRAF mutation ( ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, in contrast to humans, testing for BRAF mutation in canine TCC is a sensitive diagnostic method especially in terriers (73%) and may be recommended as a screening test. However, evidence of BRAF mutation in canine TCC is not a predictor for the histological grade. Moreover, a positive correlation between histological grade and the intensity of COX-2 expression was not found. Further studies are necessary to clarify the clinical and prognostic relevance of the elevated intensity of COX-2 expression of TCC with BRAF mutation detected in non-terriers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/vetsci6010031DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6466154PMC
March 2019

[Diagnostic value of the BRAF variant V595E in urine samples, smears and biopsies from canine transitional cell carcinoma].

Tierarztl Prax Ausg K Kleintiere Heimtiere 2018 Oct 12;46(5):289-295. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Objective: Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common malignant tumour of the canine urinary tract. Previously, the mutation of the BRAF gene V595E was identified in approximately 85 % of canine TCC cases by DNA sequencing of TCC tumour cells, both in frozen and paraffin-embedded tissue sections, as well as in urine. The objective of this study was to establish these methods in cytological smears and to investigate the prevalence of BRAF mutation V595E in canine TCC in our cohort of patients.

Material And Methods: Biopsy samples (n = 43), urine (n = 48) and/or cytological smears (n = 31) from 66 dogs with TCC (n = 33), urinary bladder polyps (n = 7), cystitis (n = 23) or without bladder diseases (n = 3), submitted for routine diagnostics, were selected. DNA isolation from paraffin material, urine and cytological smears was performed using commercially available kits. Exon 15 was examined for the presence of the BRAF mutation c.1784T>A by Sanger sequencing.

Results: In 39/43 paraffin-embedded biopsies and 38/48 urine samples, a sufficient amount of good quality DNA was isolated. DNA isolation and sequencing were successful in 16/18 smears with a high cell count, but not in the 10/13 smears with low cellularity. In all cases from which different sample materials were available, the results of BRAF analysis were identical in paraffin-embedded tissue, cytological smears and/or urine. In 22/31 dogs (70.9 %) with TCC, the presence of the BRAF mutation was confirmed, whereas it could not be detected in animals without pathological findings or with cystitis or with a polyp.

Conclusion And Clinical Relevance: BRAF mutation analysis is a new and good method to be able to mostly confirm a diagnosis of TCC in uncertain cases. Non-invasive diagnostic samples, including urine and urine sediment containing sufficient numbers of relevant cells as well as cytology aspirates and formalin-fixed biopsies can be used for analysis. However, it is important to note that only a positive identification of the mutation is diagnostic. Further research is necessary to investigate prognostic and therapeutic relevance of the variant and how this genetic analysis can be used as an early detection method for TCC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15654/TPK-180554DOI Listing
October 2018

Estrogen Receptor-α and Progesterone Receptor Expression in Mammary Proliferative Lesions of Female Pet Rabbits.

Vet Pathol 2018 11 16;55(6):838-848. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

1 Institute of Veterinary Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.

In breast cancer of women, the estrogen receptor-α (ERα) and progesterone receptor (PR) status has prognostic and therapeutic significance. The aim of this study was (1) to characterize by immunohistochemistry the expression of ERα and PR in nonneoplastic and neoplastic mammary gland tissue of pet rabbits and (2) to correlate the ERα/PR status and histological features. All 124 rabbits included in this study had a mammary tumor; in addition, 2 rabbits had lobular hyperplasia and 25 had multiple cysts. Of the 124 neoplasms, 119 (96%) were carcinoma, 2 (2%) were carcinoma in situ, and 3 (2%) were adenoma. ERα or PR or both were detected in 2 of 2 carcinomas in situ, 3 of 3 adenomas, 19 of 25 cysts, and 2 of 2 lesions of lobular hyperplasia. Most carcinomas (75/119, 63%) were negative for both ERα and PR; 22 of 119 carcinomas (18%) were double-immunopositive. The ERα and PR expression was not influenced by histotype or histological tumor grade. In carcinomas, there was a statistically significant correlation between increased mitotic count and reduced expression of ERα and PR, and the mitotic count was higher in double-immunonegative carcinomas (75/119). The findings suggest that in rabbit mammary carcinomas, proliferative activity is mainly influenced by factors other than estrogen and progesterone and provides the basis for future investigations into the prognostic significance of the ERα and PR status of mammary tumors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0300985818788611DOI Listing
November 2018

[Nephritis in a Staffordshire Terrier puppy caused by Encephalitozoon cuniculi genotype I].

Tierarztl Prax Ausg K Kleintiere Heimtiere 2017 Nov 3;45(6). Epub 2017 Nov 3.

Stephan Engelhardt, Tierklinik Dresdner Heide, Fischhausstraße 5, 01099 Dresden, E-Mail:

An 8-week-old puppy was presented to the clinic because of anorexia, polyuria, polydipsia and azotemia. The urinary sediment displayed large amounts of protozoan-like organisms, which could be identified by PCR as Encephalitozoon cuniculi genotype I. In the immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) an antibody titer against E. cuniculi of 1  :  2560 was found. The dog was treated with fenbendazole over 3 weeks. After 3 months, an antibody titer against E. cuniculi could no longer be detected. The dog recovered completely. This rare case demonstrates that E. cuniculi genotype I can cause clinical disease in dogs with renal involvement, which can be successfully treated with fenbendazole.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15654/TPK-161123DOI Listing
November 2017
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