Publications by authors named "Hebatallah Hany Assal"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Pleural Space Elastance and Its Relation to Success Rates of Pleurodesis in Malignant Pleural Effusion.

Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) 2021 Jan 9;84(1):67-73. Epub 2020 Nov 9.

Department of Chest Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.

Background: Pleurodesis fails in 10%-40% of patients with recurrent malignant pleural effusions malignant pleural effusion and dyspnea. This study aimed to assess the values of pleural elastance (PEL) after the aspiration of 500 mL of pleural fluid and their relation to the pleurodesis outcome, and to compare the pleurodesis outcome with the chemical characteristics of pleural fluid.

Methods: A prospective study was conducted in Kasr El-Aini Hospital, Cairo University, during the period from March 2019 to January 2020. The study population consisted of 40 patients with malignant pleural effusion. The measurement of PEL after the aspiration of 500 mL of fluid was done with "PEL 0.5" (cm H2O/L), and the characteristics of the pleural fluid were chemically and cytologically analyzed. Pleurodesis was done and the patients were evaluated one month later. The PEL values were compared with pleurodesis outcomes.

Results: After 4-week of follow-up, the success rate of pleurodesis was 65%. The PEL 0.5 was significantly higher in failed pleurodesis than it was in successful pleurodesis. A cutoff point of PEL 0.5 >14.5 cm H2O/L was associated with pleurodesis failure with a sensitivity and specificity of 93% and 100%, respectively. The patients with failed pleurodesis had significantly lower pH levels in fluid than those in the successful group (p<0.001).

Conclusion: PEL measurement was a significant predictor in differentiating between failed and successful pleurodesis. The increase in acidity of the malignant pleural fluid can be used as a predictor for pleurodesis failure in patients with malignant pleural effusion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4046/trd.2020.0081DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7801813PMC
January 2021

Role of Bedside Ultrasonography in Assessment of Diaphragm Function as a Predictor of Success of Weaning in Mechanically Ventilated Patients.

Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) 2020 Oct 28;83(4):295-302. Epub 2020 Aug 28.

Department of Chest Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.

Background: Weaning failure is common in mechanically ventilated patients, and if ultrasound can predict weaning outcome remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diaphragmatic function (thickness and excursion) measured by ultrasound as a predictor of the extubation outcome.

Methods: We included 62 mechanically ventilated patients from the chest intensive care unit in this study. Sixty-two patients who successfully passed the spontaneous breathing trial (SBT) were enrolled. The transthoracic ultrasound of the diaphragm was performed during an SBT to the assess diaphragmatic function (excursion and thickness), and they were classified into the successful extubation group and the failed extubation group.

Results: There was a statistically significant increase in the successful extubation group in the diaphragmatic excursion and thickness fraction (p<0.001), a statistically significant negative correlation between the diaphragmatic function and the duration of the mechanical ventilation, and a statistically significant negative correlation between the diaphragmatic excursion and the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II. The diaphragmatic excursion cutoff value predictive of weaning was 1.25 cm, with a specificity of 82.1% and a sensitivity of 97.1% respectively, and the diaphragmatic thickness cut-off value predictive of weaning was 21.5%, with a specificity of 60.7% and a sensitivity of 91.2%, respectively.

Conclusion: The diaphragmatic ultrasonography was found to be a promising tool for predicting the extubation outcome for mechanically ventilated patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4046/trd.2020.0045DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7515673PMC
October 2020