Publications by authors named "Heather R Heizer"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

IVIG Compared to IVIG Plus Infliximab in Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children.

Pediatrics 2021 Sep 22. Epub 2021 Sep 22.

Department of Pediatrics, Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2021-052702DOI Listing
September 2021

IVIG Compared to IVIG Plus Infliximab in Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children.

Pediatrics 2021 Sep 21. Epub 2021 Sep 21.

Department of Pediatrics, Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO;

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2021-052702DOI Listing
September 2021

Concurrent Respiratory Viruses and Kawasaki Disease.

Pediatrics 2015 Sep 24;136(3):e609-14. Epub 2015 Aug 24.

Sections of Infectious Diseases, and

Background: The diagnosis of Kawasaki disease (KD) remains challenging without a definitive diagnostic test and currently is guided by using clinical patient characteristics and supported by laboratory data. The role of respiratory viruses in the pathogenesis of KD is not fully understood.

Methods: Charts of patients with KD admitted to Children's Hospital Colorado from January 2009 to May 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with KD who had a nasopharyngeal wash submitted for multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) viral testing were included. Clinical characteristics, laboratory data, and outcomes of patients with and without positive respiratory viral PCR results were compared.

Results: Of 222 patients with KD admitted to the hospital, 192 (86%) had a respiratory viral PCR test performed on or shortly after admission. Ninety-three (41.9%) of the 192 patients with KD had a positive respiratory viral PCR, and the majority were positive for rhinovirus/enterovirus. No statistically significant differences were found in the clinical characteristics and laboratory values between the groups with and without positive respiratory viral PCR findings. Both groups had the same frequency of upper respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms and had the same incidence of admission to the PICU, intravenous immunoglobulin-resistant disease, and coronary artery lesions.

Conclusions: No differences in clinical presentations or outcomes in children with KD stratified according to positive or negative respiratory viral PCR testing were observed. A positive respiratory viral PCR or presence of respiratory symptoms at the time of presentation should not be used to exclude a diagnosis of KD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2015-0950DOI Listing
September 2015

Influence of Culture Results on Management and Outcome of Pediatric Osteomyelitis and/or Septic Arthritis.

J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc 2012 Jun 3;1(2):152-6. Epub 2012 May 3.

Colorado School of Public Health Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine Department of Epidemiology, Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora.

Children with uncomplicated osteomyelitis and/or septic arthritis were more likely (P < .01) to have positive focus than blood cultures. Those who grew a pathogen and/or started on a single antibiotic were more likely to be discharged on a single antibiotic, and those sent home on oral therapy had fewer adverse events.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jpids/pis035DOI Listing
June 2012

The constitutive capacity of human keratinocytes to kill Staphylococcus aureus is dependent on beta-defensin 3.

J Invest Dermatol 2007 Oct 26;127(10):2368-80. Epub 2007 Apr 26.

Division of Pediatric Allergy/Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, National Jewish Medical and Research Center, Denver, Colorado 80206, USA.

Normal skin is often exposed to bacteria, including potent pathogens such as E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus sp., but these microbes usually do not cause skin inflammation or infection in healthy individuals. Therefore, we hypothesized that there must be a constitutive mechanism for rapid destruction and elimination of small numbers of bacteria which penetrate the stratum corneum from everyday activities. This study found that exposure of keratinocytes cultured from a number of individuals to S. aureus resulted in approximately 2-3 log better killing than by HaCaT cells within 1 hour. Killing required contact between the keratinocytes and the bacteria, but was not dependent on internalization. Contact between the bacteria and the keratinocytes resulted in rapid deposition of several antimicrobial peptides onto the bacteria, but only human beta-defensin (HBD) 3 accumulated at levels sufficient to account for killing when S. aureus were exposed to human skin explants. Blocking peptide binding of HBD3 inhibited killing of the bacteria, indicating an essential role for beta-defensin 3 in the constitutive killing of bacteria by normal keratinocytes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.jid.5700861DOI Listing
October 2007
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