Publications by authors named "Heather L Ferguson"

4 Publications

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The genomic landscape of balanced cytogenetic abnormalities associated with human congenital anomalies.

Authors:
Claire Redin Harrison Brand Ryan L Collins Tammy Kammin Elyse Mitchell Jennelle C Hodge Carrie Hanscom Vamsee Pillalamarri Catarina M Seabra Mary-Alice Abbott Omar A Abdul-Rahman Erika Aberg Rhett Adley Sofia L Alcaraz-Estrada Fowzan S Alkuraya Yu An Mary-Anne Anderson Caroline Antolik Kwame Anyane-Yeboa Joan F Atkin Tina Bartell Jonathan A Bernstein Elizabeth Beyer Ian Blumenthal Ernie M H F Bongers Eva H Brilstra Chester W Brown Hennie T Brüggenwirth Bert Callewaert Colby Chiang Ken Corning Helen Cox Edwin Cuppen Benjamin B Currall Tom Cushing Dezso David Matthew A Deardorff Annelies Dheedene Marc D'Hooghe Bert B A de Vries Dawn L Earl Heather L Ferguson Heather Fisher David R FitzPatrick Pamela Gerrol Daniela Giachino Joseph T Glessner Troy Gliem Margo Grady Brett H Graham Cristin Griffis Karen W Gripp Andrea L Gropman Andrea Hanson-Kahn David J Harris Mark A Hayden Rosamund Hill Ron Hochstenbach Jodi D Hoffman Robert J Hopkin Monika W Hubshman A Micheil Innes Mira Irons Melita Irving Jessie C Jacobsen Sandra Janssens Tamison Jewett John P Johnson Marjolijn C Jongmans Stephen G Kahler David A Koolen Jerome Korzelius Peter M Kroisel Yves Lacassie William Lawless Emmanuelle Lemyre Kathleen Leppig Alex V Levin Haibo Li Hong Li Eric C Liao Cynthia Lim Edward J Lose Diane Lucente Michael J Macera Poornima Manavalan Giorgia Mandrile Carlo L Marcelis Lauren Margolin Tamara Mason Diane Masser-Frye Michael W McClellan Cinthya J Zepeda Mendoza Björn Menten Sjors Middelkamp Liya R Mikami Emily Moe Shehla Mohammed Tarja Mononen Megan E Mortenson Graciela Moya Aggie W Nieuwint Zehra Ordulu Sandhya Parkash Susan P Pauker Shahrin Pereira Danielle Perrin Katy Phelan Raul E Piña Aguilar Pino J Poddighe Giulia Pregno Salmo Raskin Linda Reis William Rhead Debra Rita Ivo Renkens Filip Roelens Jayla Ruliera Patrick Rump Samantha L P Schilit Ranad Shaheen Rebecca Sparkes Erica Spiegel Blair Stevens Matthew R Stone Julia Tagoe Joseph V Thakuria Bregje W van Bon Jiddeke van de Kamp Ineke van Der Burgt Ton van Essen Conny M van Ravenswaaij-Arts Markus J van Roosmalen Sarah Vergult Catharina M L Volker-Touw Dorothy P Warburton Matthew J Waterman Susan Wiley Anna Wilson Maria de la Concepcion A Yerena-de Vega Roberto T Zori Brynn Levy Han G Brunner Nicole de Leeuw Wigard P Kloosterman Erik C Thorland Cynthia C Morton James F Gusella Michael E Talkowski

Nat Genet 2017 01 14;49(1):36-45. Epub 2016 Nov 14.

Molecular Neurogenetics Unit, Center for Human Genetic Research, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Despite the clinical significance of balanced chromosomal abnormalities (BCAs), their characterization has largely been restricted to cytogenetic resolution. We explored the landscape of BCAs at nucleotide resolution in 273 subjects with a spectrum of congenital anomalies. Whole-genome sequencing revised 93% of karyotypes and demonstrated complexity that was cryptic to karyotyping in 21% of BCAs, highlighting the limitations of conventional cytogenetic approaches. At least 33.9% of BCAs resulted in gene disruption that likely contributed to the developmental phenotype, 5.2% were associated with pathogenic genomic imbalances, and 7.3% disrupted topologically associated domains (TADs) encompassing known syndromic loci. Remarkably, BCA breakpoints in eight subjects altered a single TAD encompassing MEF2C, a known driver of 5q14.3 microdeletion syndrome, resulting in decreased MEF2C expression. We propose that sequence-level resolution dramatically improves prediction of clinical outcomes for balanced rearrangements and provides insight into new pathogenic mechanisms, such as altered regulation due to changes in chromosome topology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ng.3720DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5307971PMC
January 2017

Deletion of an enhancer near DLX5 and DLX6 in a family with hearing loss, craniofacial defects, and an inv(7)(q21.3q35).

Hum Genet 2010 Jan;127(1):19-31

Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Precisely regulated temporal and spatial patterns of gene expression are essential for proper human development. Cis-acting regulatory elements, some located at large distances from their corresponding genes, play a critical role in transcriptional control of key developmental genes and disruption of these regulatory elements can lead to disease. We report a three generation family with five affected members, all of whom have hearing loss, craniofacial defects, and a paracentric inversion of the long arm of chromosome 7, inv(7)(q21.3q35). High resolution mapping of the inversion showed that the 7q21.3 breakpoint is located 65 and 80 kb centromeric of DLX6 and DLX5, respectively. Further analysis revealed a 5,115 bp deletion at the 7q21.3 breakpoint. While the breakpoint does not disrupt either DLX5 or DLX6, the syndrome present in the family is similar to that observed in Dlx5 knockout mice and includes a subset of the features observed in individuals with DLX5 and DLX6 deletions, implicating dysregulation of DLX5 and DLX6 in the family's phenotype. Bioinformatic analysis indicates that the 5,115 bp deletion at the 7q21.3 breakpoint could contain regulatory elements necessary for DLX5 and DLX6 expression. Using a transgenic mouse reporter assay, we show that the deleted sequence can drive expression in the inner ear and developing bones of E12.5 embryos. Consequently, the observed familial syndrome is likely caused by dysregulation of DLX5 and/or DLX6 in specific tissues due to deletion of an enhancer and possibly separation from other regulatory elements by the chromosomal inversion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00439-009-0736-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2847447PMC
January 2010

Characterization of apparently balanced chromosomal rearrangements from the developmental genome anatomy project.

Am J Hum Genet 2008 Mar;82(3):712-22

Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Apparently balanced chromosomal rearrangements in individuals with major congenital anomalies represent natural experiments of gene disruption and dysregulation. These individuals can be studied to identify novel genes critical in human development and to annotate further the function of known genes. Identification and characterization of these genes is the goal of the Developmental Genome Anatomy Project (DGAP). DGAP is a multidisciplinary effort that leverages the recent advances resulting from the Human Genome Project to increase our understanding of birth defects and the process of human development. Clinically significant phenotypes of individuals enrolled in DGAP are varied and, in most cases, involve multiple organ systems. Study of these individuals' chromosomal rearrangements has resulted in the mapping of 77 breakpoints from 40 chromosomal rearrangements by FISH with BACs and fosmids, array CGH, Southern-blot hybridization, MLPA, RT-PCR, and suppression PCR. Eighteen chromosomal breakpoints have been cloned and sequenced. Unsuspected genomic imbalances and cryptic rearrangements were detected, but less frequently than has been reported previously. Chromosomal rearrangements, both balanced and unbalanced, in individuals with multiple congenital anomalies continue to be a valuable resource for gene discovery and annotation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2008.01.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2427206PMC
March 2008

Constitutional rearrangement of the architectural factor HMGA2: a novel human phenotype including overgrowth and lipomas.

Am J Hum Genet 2005 Feb 10;76(2):340-8. Epub 2004 Dec 10.

Department of Pathology, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Although somatic mutations in a number of genes have been associated with development of human tumors, such as lipomas, relatively few examples exist of germline mutations in these genes. Here we describe an 8-year-old boy who has a de novo pericentric inversion of chromosome 12, with breakpoints at p11.22 and q14.3, and a phenotype including extreme somatic overgrowth, advanced endochondral bone and dental ages, a cerebellar tumor, and multiple lipomas. His chromosomal inversion was found to truncate HMGA2, a gene that encodes an architectural factor involved in the etiology of many benign mesenchymal tumors and that maps to the 12q14.3 breakpoint. Similar truncations of murine Hmga2 in transgenic mice result in somatic overgrowth and, in particular, increased abundance of fat and lipomas, features strikingly similar to those observed in the child. This represents the first report of a constitutional rearrangement affecting HMGA2 and demonstrates the role of this gene in human growth and development. Systematic genetic analysis and clinical studies of this child may offer unique insights into the role of HMGA2 in adipogenesis, osteogenesis, and general growth control.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/427565DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1196379PMC
February 2005