Publications by authors named "Heather Baid"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Human factors and ergonomics to improve performance in intensive care units during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2021 ;53(3):265-270

International Fluid Academy, Lovenjoel, Belgium.

The COVID-19 pandemic has tested the very elements of human factors and ergonomics (HFE) to their maximum. HFE is an established scientific discipline that studies the interrelationship between humans, equipment, and the work environment. HFE includes situation awareness, decision making, communication, team working, leadership, managing stress, and coping with fatigue, empathy, and resilience. The main objective of HF is to optimise the interaction of humans with their work environment and technical equipment in order to maximise patient safety and efficiency of care. This paper reviews the importance of HFE in helping intensivists and all the multidisciplinary ICU teams to deliver high-quality care to patients in crisis situations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5114/ait.2021.105760DOI Listing
September 2021

Reducing critical care's carbon footprint with financial and social co-benefits.

Intensive Crit Care Nurs 2021 06 18;64:103030. Epub 2021 Mar 18.

Shrewsbury and Telford Hospitals NHS Trust, Mytton Oak Road, Shrewsbury SY3 8XQ, UK; Intensive Care Society - Environmental Sustainability Workgroup, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iccn.2021.103030DOI Listing
June 2021

Sustainability issues in critical care and the transition to online-only publication.

Nurs Crit Care 2021 01 2;26(1):7-9. Epub 2021 Jan 2.

Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Malta, L-Imsida, Malta.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nicc.12587DOI Listing
January 2021

Sustainability in critical care practice: A grounded theory study.

Nurs Crit Care 2021 01 12;26(1):20-27. Epub 2019 Dec 12.

School of Health Sciences, University of Brighton, Eastbourne, UK.

Background: Sustaining high-quality, critical care practice is challenging because of current limits to financial, environmental, and social resources. The National Health Service in England intends to be more sustainable, although there is minimal research into what sustainability means to people working in critical care, and a theoretical framework is lacking that explains the social processes influencing sustainability in critical care.

Aims And Objectives: This study aimed to explain the concept of sustainability from the perspective of practitioners caring for critically ill patients.

Design: The qualitative research followed a Charmazian constructivist grounded theory approach, including concurrent data collection and interpretation through constant comparison analysis.

Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted online or by telephone with 11 health care professionals working in critical care in the South of England (8 nurses, 2 physiotherapists, and 1 technician). Schatzman's dimensional analysis and Straussian grounded theory techniques supplemented the data analysis.

Results: Sustainability was defined as maintaining financial, environmental, and social resources throughout the micro, meso, and macro systems of critical care practice. The most pertinent social process enabling sustainability of critical care was satisficing (satisfaction of achieving a goal of quality care while sufficing within the limits of available resources). Increased satisficing enabled practitioners to fulfil their sense of normative, responsible, sustainable, and flourishing practice. Satisficing was bounded by the cognitive and environmental influences on decisions and an ethical imperative to ensure resources were used wisely through stewarding.

Conclusions: An explanation of the concept of sustainability and significant social processes, in relation to critical care, are presented in a theoretical framework, with implications for how financial, environmental, and social resources for critical care practice can be maintained.

Relevance To Clinical Practice: This theory offers clinicians, managers, educators, and researchers a definition of sustainability in critical care practice and provides a structured approach to addressing critical care sustainability issues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nicc.12493DOI Listing
January 2021

Resilience in critical care nurses - is it desirable?

Authors:
Heather Baid

Nurs Crit Care 2018 11;23(6):281-282

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nicc.12390DOI Listing
November 2018

Patient Safety: Identifying and Managing Complications of Mechanical Ventilation.

Authors:
Heather Baid

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2016 Dec 19;28(4):451-462. Epub 2016 Sep 19.

School of Health Sciences, University of Brighton, Westlain House, Village Way, Falmer Campus, Brighton BN1 9PH, UK. Electronic address:

Mechanical ventilation is a fundamental aspect of critical care practice to help meet the respiratory needs of critically ill patients. Complications can occur though, as a direct result of being mechanically ventilated, or indirectly because of a secondary process. Preventing, identifying, and managing these complications significantly contribute to the role and responsibilities of critical care nurses in promoting patient safety. This article reviews common ventilator-associated events, including both infectious (eg, ventilator-associated pneumonia) and noninfectious causes (eg, acute respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary edema, pleural effusion, and atelectasis).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2016.07.005DOI Listing
December 2016

Quality and safety: reflection on the implications for critical care nursing education.

Nurs Crit Care 2015 Jul 10;20(4):174-82. Epub 2015 May 10.

School of Health Sciences, University of Brighton, Brighton, UK.

Background: Safe and high quality health care is underpinned by health care professionals possessing the knowledge, skills and professional attributes which are necessary for their specific clinical speciality and area of practice. Education is crucial as it enables clinicians to learn and put into practice their specialist knowledge, skills and attributes. These elements will be based on clinical standards, which set the agenda for quality and safety in health care.

Aim: The purpose of this paper is to reflect upon how a post-registration, degree-level critical care nursing course provided by an English university facilitates nurses to deliver high quality, safe nursing care for critically ill patients and their families.

Methods: As a reflective analysis, the process of reflection will be guided and structured according to Rolfe's framework for reflective practice. The reflection is based upon the personal observations and teaching experiences of two university lecturers involved in the delivery of the critical care course.

Conclusions: Critical care nursing education can incorporate informed practice, simulation and non-technical skills into post-registration critical-care nursing courses as a way of promoting high-quality, safe clinical practice in the critical care setting. This article provides examples from one course's experience with doing this and ends with specific recommendations for how critical care nursing courses can enhance further the promotion of quality and safety.

Relevance To Clinical Practice: Educators, mentors and students of post-registration critical care nursing courses are encouraged to explore the relevance of nursing education in promoting safe and high-quality clinical practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nicc.12182DOI Listing
July 2015

The objective structured clinical examination within intensive care nursing education.

Authors:
Heather Baid

Nurs Crit Care 2011 Mar-Apr;16(2):99-105

School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Brighton, Westlain House, Village Way, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9PH, UK.

Background: The objective structured clinical examination is commonly referred to as an 'OSCE' and is a way of assessing a student's competency with clinical skills. The OSCE involves the student demonstrating a skill during a simulated clinical situation in a controlled environment instead of using real patients in the practice setting. Post-registered nursing courses are now beginning to use the OSCE as a form of summative assessment either as replacement for or in addition to skills assessed by a mentor in practice.

Aim: This paper aims to reflect back on a recent experience of introducing an OSCE into a post-registered, degree level intensive care nursing programme.

Methods: The process of reflection will be used throughout the analysis following the Six Thinking Hats tool.

Conclusions: Organizing and implementing an OSCE for an intensive care nursing programme required a great deal of preparation and time of the teacher but also offered various benefits and advantages compared with other forms of assessment. Disadvantages and limitations of the OSCE are also identified in this article along with recommendations and practical advice for other teachers, examiners and students participating in OSCEs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1478-5153.2010.00396.xDOI Listing
June 2011

Enjoyable learning: the role of humour, games, and fun activities in nursing and midwifery education.

Nurse Educ Today 2010 Aug 30;30(6):548-52. Epub 2009 Dec 30.

School of Nursing & Midwifery, University of Brighton, Westlain House, Village Way, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9PH, United Kingdom.

Education that captures the attention of students is an essential aspect of promoting meaningful, active learning. Rather than standing at the front of a group of learners simply speaking about a topic, teachers have the opportunity of livening up their teaching with humour, games, and other fun activities. This article critically evaluates the benefits and limitations of humour within nursing education as well as the use of games and fun activities as teaching strategies. Examples of various games and interactive activities are also provided.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2009.11.007DOI Listing
August 2010

A critical review of auscultating bowel sounds.

Authors:
Heather Baid

Br J Nurs 2009 Oct 8-21;18(18):1125-9

University of Brighton, Brighton, UK.

Auscultation (listening for bowel sounds) is part of an abdominal physical assessment and is performed to determine whether normal bowel sounds are present. This article evaluates the technique involved in listening for bowel sounds and the significance of both normal and abnormal auscultation findings. Review of the relevant literature reveals conflicting information and a lack of available research on the topic of auscultating bowel sounds. The clinical significance of auscultation findings when there is no evidence base to support the practice of listening for bowel sounds is explored by further analysis of the literature and reflection by the author on the teaching she received and her own personal practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjon.2009.18.18.44555DOI Listing
January 2010

Advanced physical assessment: the role of the district nurse.

Nurs Stand 2009 May 6-12;23(35):41-6

South Downs Health NHS Trust.

This article describes an initiative by an NHS trust to support its district nurses in developing and using physical examination skills as part of patient assessment. The article outlines the process and suggests that the initiative is important to help meet the needs of older patients with long-term conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7748/ns2009.05.23.35.41.c6958DOI Listing
July 2009

Differential diagnosis in advanced nursing practice.

Authors:
Heather Baid

Br J Nurs 2006 Oct 12-25;15(18):1007-11

Surrey and Sussex Strategic Health Authority, Horley, Surrey.

Differential diagnosis has become a key element of advanced nursing roles that are incorporating history taking and physical assessment into their remit of professional responsibilities. The aim of this article is to review the relevant definitions of different types of diagnoses, to describe the process of formulating a differential diagnosis including using clinical reasoning skills, and to use a case study as an example of differential diagnosis in advanced clinical practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjon.2006.15.18.22027DOI Listing
December 2006

The process of conducting a physical assessment: a nursing perspective.

Authors:
Heather Baid

Br J Nurs 2006 Jul 13-27;15(13):710-4

Surrey and Sussex Strategic Health Authority.

Physical assessment is a new responsibility for many nurses in the UK who are expanding their parameters of advanced clinical practice. A physical assessment framework can be used by both community and acute care nurses as a guide to the process of conducting a physical assessment. The framework presented here consists of the following sequence of steps: identifying the purpose of the assessment; taking a health history; choosing a comprehensive or focused approach; and examining the patient using the sequence of inspection, palpation, percussion and auscultation. The next step, interpretation of the clinical findings, which results in either the recognition of abnormality or identification of a differential diagnosis, then becomes the basis for clinical decision making. This paper describes a comprehensive, head-to-toe assessment as one example of the application of this physical assessment framework in clinical practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjon.2006.15.13.21482DOI Listing
September 2006
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