Publications by authors named "Hazem Ghobashy"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Genetic variation of Brucella isolates at strain level in Egypt.

Vet Med Sci 2020 08 7;6(3):421-432. Epub 2020 Apr 7.

Fayoum Regional Laboratory, Animal Health Research Institute, Agricultural Research Center, Fayoum, Egypt.

In this study, Multiple Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis (MLVA-16) was performed on 18 Brucella isolates identified bacteriologically and molecularly (AMOS-PCR) as Brucella abortus (n = 6) and Brucella melitensis (n = 12). This was aimed to study the genetic association among some Egyptian Brucella genotypes isolated during the period from 2002 to 2013 along with the global genotypes database. MLVA-16 analysis for B. melitensis and B. abortus strains illustrates a total of 11, and 3 genotypes with 10 and 1 singleton genotypes, respectively. B. melitensis strains displayed greater markers diversity by VNTRs analysis of the 16 loci than B. abortus and this was attributed mainly to the diverging in panel 2B markers. B. melitensis genotype M4_Fayoum_Giza (3,5,3,13,1,1,3,3,8,21,8,7,5,9,5,3) was the only predominated genotype circulating between two different governorates. The most common B. abortus genotype, GT A3_Dakahlia (4,5,4,12,2,2,3,3,6,21,8,4,4,3,4,4), was present in three identical isolates. In phylogeny, Egyptian B. abortus bv1 genotypes were closely related to East Asian strain (for the first time), Western Mediterranean and Americas clonal lineages. B. melitensis local genotypes exhibit a genetic relatedness mostly to Western Mediterranean clonal lineage and one strain of Eastern Mediterranean clonal lineage. In conclusion, the geographic location is not the only factor stands behind the high genetic similarity of the Egyptian Brucella genotypes. These low variations may be a result of a stepwise mutational event of the most variable loci from a very limited number of ancestors especially during the transmission through non-preference hosts. The authors encourage the authorities in charge to establish pre-movement testing to reduce the risk of brucellosis spread.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/vms3.260DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7397911PMC
August 2020

High proportion of MERS-CoV shedding dromedaries at slaughterhouse with a potential epidemiological link to human cases, Qatar 2014.

Infect Ecol Epidemiol 2015 15;5:28305. Epub 2015 Jul 15.

Department of Viroscience, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Two of the earliest Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) cases were men who had visited the Doha central animal market and adjoining slaughterhouse in Qatar. We show that a high proportion of camels presenting for slaughter in Qatar show evidence for nasal MERS-CoV shedding (62/105). Sequence analysis showed the circulation of at least five different virus strains at these premises, suggesting that this location is a driver of MERS-CoV circulation and a high-risk area for human exposure. No correlation between RNA loads and levels of neutralizing antibodies was observed, suggesting limited immune protection and potential for reinfection despite previous exposure.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4505336PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/iee.v5.28305DOI Listing
July 2015

Isolation of MERS coronavirus from a dromedary camel, Qatar, 2014.

Emerg Infect Dis 2014 Aug;20(8):1339-42

We obtained the full genome of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) from a camel in Qatar. This virus is highly similar to the human England/Qatar 1 virus isolated in 2012. The MERS-CoV from the camel efficiently replicated in human cells, providing further evidence for the zoonotic potential of MERS-CoV from camels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2008.140663DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4111206PMC
August 2014

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in dromedary camels: an outbreak investigation.

Lancet Infect Dis 2014 Feb 17;14(2):140-5. Epub 2013 Dec 17.

Department of Viroscience, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands; Centre for Infectious Disease Research, Diagnostics and Screening, Division of Virology, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands. Electronic address:

Background: Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes severe lower respiratory tract infection in people. Previous studies suggested dromedary camels were a reservoir for this virus. We tested for the presence of MERS-CoV in dromedary camels from a farm in Qatar linked to two human cases of the infection in October, 2013.

Methods: We took nose swabs, rectal swabs, and blood samples from all camels on the Qatari farm. We tested swabs with RT-PCR, with amplification targeting the E gene (upE), nucleocapsid (N) gene, and open reading frame (ORF) 1a. PCR positive samples were tested by different MERS-CoV specific PCRs and obtained sequences were used for phylogentic analysis together with sequences from the linked human cases and other human cases. We tested serum samples from the camels for IgG immunofluorescence assay, protein microarray, and virus neutralisation assay.

Findings: We obtained samples from 14 camels on Oct 17, 2013. We detected MERS-CoV in nose swabs from three camels by three independent RT-PCRs and sequencing. The nucleotide sequence of an ORF1a fragment (940 nucleotides) and a 4·2 kb concatenated fragment were very similar to the MERS-CoV from two human cases on the same farm and a MERS-CoV isolate from Hafr-Al-Batin. Eight additional camel nose swabs were positive on one or more RT-PCRs, but could not be confirmed by sequencing. All camels had MERS-CoV spike-binding antibodies that correlated well with the presence of neutralising antibodies to MERS-CoV.

Interpretation: Our study provides virological confirmation of MERS-CoV in camels and suggests a recent outbreak affecting both human beings and camels. We cannot conclude whether the people on the farm were infected by the camels or vice versa, or if a third source was responsible.

Funding: European Union projects EMPERIE (contract number 223498), ANTIGONE (contract number 278976), and the VIRGO consortium.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(13)70690-XDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7106553PMC
February 2014