Publications by authors named "Haytham Mously"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Non-Invasive Imaging in the Evaluation of Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy in Heart Transplantation: A Systematic Review.

Curr Probl Cardiol 2022 Jan 8:101103. Epub 2022 Jan 8.

Department of Medicine, University Hospitals, Cleveland, Ohio; Harrington Heart and Vascular Institute, University Hospitals and School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. Electronic address:

Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is the leading cause of long-term graft dysfunction in patients with heart transplantation and is linked with significant morbidity and mortality. Currently, the gold standard for diagnosing CAV is coronary imaging with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) during traditional invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Invasive imaging, however, carries increased procedural risk and expense to patients in addition to requiring an experienced interventionalist. With the improvements in non-invasive cardiac imaging modalities such as transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET), an alternative non-invasive imaging approach for the early detection of CAV may be feasible. In this systematic review, we explored the literature to investigate the utility of non-invasive imaging in diagnosis of CAV in >3000 patients across 49 studies. We also discuss the strengths and weaknesses for each imaging modality. Overall, all four imaging modalities show good to excellent accuracy for identifying CAV with significant variations across studies. Majority of the studies compared non-invasive imaging with ICA without intravascular imaging. In summary, non-invasive imaging modalities offer an alternative approach to invasive coronary imaging for CAV. Future studies should investigate longitudinal non-invasive protocols in low-risk patients after heart transplantation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpcardiol.2022.101103DOI Listing
January 2022

The utility of geriatric nutritional risk index to predict outcomes in chronic limb-threatening ischemia.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv 2022 Jan 19;99(1):121-133. Epub 2021 Sep 19.

Harrington Heart and Vascular Institute, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

Objectives: To assess geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) in patients with chronic limb-threatening ischemia (CLTI).

Background: The prevalence of CLTI continues to rise, with major amputation and mortality remaining prominent. Frailty is a vital risk factor for adverse outcomes in cardiovascular care. The GNRI is a nutrition-based surrogate for frailty that has been utilized in Southeast Asia to predict adverse events in CLTI. It has not yet been evaluated in a primarily Western population, nor in the context of wound healing.

Methods: Between 8August 2017 and April 2019, we identified patients undergoing endovascular interventions for CLTI at our institution, categorized into low GNRI (≤ 94, frail) versus normal GNRI (> 94, reference). We analyzed the risks of major adverse limb events (MALE), its individual components [mortality, major amputation, and target vessel revascularization (TVR)], amputation free survival (AFS), and wound healing using Kaplan-Meier and multivariate cox-proportional hazard regression analyses.

Results: A total of 255 patients were included in the analysis, with follow up of 14 ± 9.1 months. Lower GNRI was associated with higher cumulative event rates for MALE (71.0% vs. 43.3%, p <  0.001), mortality (34.3% vs. 15.2%, p < 0.001), major amputation (31.2% vs. 15.8%, p = 0.002), and freedom from AFS (56.0% vs. 28.2%, p < 0.001). There was a trend toward lower TVR and higher wound healing with higher GNRI score.

Conclusions: Our single-center, retrospective evaluation of GNRI (as a surrogate for frailty) correlated with increased risks of MALE, mortality, and major amputation. Future directions should focus not only on the recognition of these patients, but risk-factor modification to optimize long-term outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ccd.29949DOI Listing
January 2022

Recurrent ventricular septal defect following closure CorMatrix: A case report.

J Card Surg 2021 Jan 22;36(1):392-395. Epub 2020 Nov 22.

Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

Ventricular septal ruptures are an uncommon complication following acute myocardial infarction. Operative repair, utilizing a patch for closure of the defect, is the primary treatment modality to achieve hemodynamic stability. The use of an extracellular matrix derived from small intestinal submucosa as a scaffold for tissue repair is becoming increasingly common. Here, we present the case of a 58-year-old female found to have a ventricular septal rupture and posterior left ventricular aneurysm following late presentation after a myocardial infarction that required operative repair with a CorMatrix patch. Upon readmission for dyspnea and poor exercise tolerance several months later, the patch was subsequently found to have near-completely reabsorbed. There is a paucity of long-term outcomes data following the use of CorMatrix for septal defects, with rare reports of such reabsorption. Further study is required to identify the incidence and implications of such findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocs.15163DOI Listing
January 2021

Seizure-Associated ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction in Absence of Plaque Rupture.

Case Rep Med 2018 18;2018:6186521. Epub 2018 Apr 18.

Harrington Heart and Vascular Institute, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA.

Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a very common cause of morbidity and mortality in the U.S. Here, we present a case of acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in the setting of seizure activity. In this rare case, we have data from optical coherence tomography (OCT) that showed no plaque disruption, showing the role of OCT in understanding the pathophysiology of STEMI and providing some ideas for the mechanism of this seizure-induced STEMI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/6186521DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5932506PMC
April 2018
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