Publications by authors named "Hayley Dauterman"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effortful control moderates the relation between negative emotionality and socially appropriate behavior.

J Exp Child Psychol 2021 Jul 17;207:105119. Epub 2021 Mar 17.

Department of Clinical Psychology, Seattle Pacific University, Seattle, WA 98119, USA.

The current study investigated the relation between negative emotionality and socially appropriate behavior in a diverse sample of preschool and kindergarten children (N = 74). More specifically, we tested whether effortful control would moderate this relation. A computerized task measured children's effortful control by assessing their accuracy in shifting attention between different emotionally valenced faces (happy and angry) while inhibiting their responses to neutral faces. Teachers completed the Affect Intensity Scale-Child Version to assess child negative emotionality as well as the Preschool and Kindergarten Behavior Scales to assess two aspects of socially appropriate behavior (social cooperation and inhibition of externalizing behavior). Regression analyses indicated that children with high negative emotionality and strong effortful control had fewer externalizing problems and greater social cooperation compared with their counterparts with weaker effortful control. These findings support and extend previous research suggesting that effortful control may protect children, particularly those with high negative emotionality, from poor social outcomes. A novel contribution of this study is its use of an attention shifting task that incorporates emotionally salient stimuli. These findings have important implications for educators working with young children who encounter increased expectations for regulating their behavior during preschool and kindergarten.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2021.105119DOI Listing
July 2021

ADHD symptoms moderate the relation between ASD status and internalizing symptoms in 3-6-year-old children.

J Autism Dev Disord 2014 Jun;44(6):1347-56

Clinical Psychology Department, Seattle Pacific University, 3307 Third Avenue West, Suite 107, Seattle, WA, 98119-1997, USA,

The current study sought to understand the relation between diagnostic status (autism spectrum disorders [ASD] versus typically developing) and internalizing problems in children with and without co-occurring attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms. Participants were 88 children, ages 3:0-6:11, their parents and teachers. Findings indicated that ADHD symptoms moderated the relation between diagnostic status and depressive and somatic symptoms. High ADHD symptoms in children with ASD were associated with increased depressive and somatic symptoms compared to children with typical development. Findings suggest poor prognostic outcomes for children with ASD and co-occurring ADHD symptoms and highlight the need for early identification and targeted intervention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-013-1995-4DOI Listing
June 2014

An early social engagement intervention for young children with autism and their parents.

J Autism Dev Disord 2012 Dec;42(12):2702-17

Koegel Autism Center, Gervitz Graduate School of Education, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9490, USA.

The social vulnerabilities associated with young children with autism are recognized as important intervention targets due to their influence on subsequent development. Current research suggests that interventions that combine motivational and social components can create meaningful changes in social functioning. Simultaneously, it is hypothesized that parent delivery of such strategies can invoke increases in these core social behaviors and parent engagement. This study examined the effects of teaching parents to implement a social engagement intervention with their children. The results indicated that the use of this parent-delivered social intervention led to (a) increases in their children's use of eye contact, directed positive affect, and verbal initiations, (b) increases in parent positive affect and synchronous engagement, and (c) generalized increases in parent and child behaviors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-012-1535-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3791600PMC
December 2012