Publications by authors named "Hatam Godini"

5 Publications

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Water and wastewater as potential sources of SARS-CoV-2 transmission: a systematic review.

Rev Environ Health 2021 Feb 16. Epub 2021 Feb 16.

Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran.

An important group of viruses are Coronaviruses that affect the health of people worldwide, in particular the acute respiratory syndrome. The present work has addressed the updated literature on the topic of coronaviruses transmission through water and wastewater as well as identified gaps in research to inform future studies. In total, 198 articles were selected, then after screening, 48 eligible studies were fully reviewed. Accordingly, the studies showed that the coronavirus has been isolated and identified from water as well as wastewater. The results of researches show that the presence of SARS-Co-2 virus in municipal wastewater is possible due to the excretion of the virus in human feces. In addition, the SARS-Co-2 virus was isolated from contaminated water and rivers, but there is insufficient evidence for virus transmission by water and wastewater. Water and wastewater treatment methods are able to reduce the pollution load caused by this virus in water sources. Water disinfection has an effective role in removing it from water and wastewater sources. Due to the short period of time in the global pandemic and the small number of studies in this field, further studies are needed to make a definite statement about the transferability of virus in water and wastewater.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/reveh-2020-0148DOI Listing
February 2021

Study on the relationship between the concentration and type of fungal bio-aerosols at indoor and outdoor air in the Children's Medical Center, Tehran, Iran.

Environ Monit Assess 2019 Jan 4;191(2):48. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Immunology, Asthma & Allergy Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Fungal bio-aerosols are of concern due to their adverse health effects, especially in indoor environments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the concentration and type of fungal bio-aerosols in the indoor and outdoor of Children's Medical Center in Tehran, Iran. In the present descriptive-analytical study, the fungal bio-aerosols' concentrations in both indoor and outdoor of the hospital air were measured. The measurements were carried out by the Anderson method using a Quick Take 30 pump at 28.3 L min and 2.5 min sampling that was placed on a Sabouraud dextrose agar with chloramphenicol. The average concentrations of total fungal bio-aerosols in the hospital indoor and outdoor air were 40.48 and 119.6 CFU/m, respectively. Onco-hematology and bone marrow transplantation wards were the most and least contaminated units, respectively (11.09 CFU/m vs 1.47 CFU/m). The most common fungi isolated from the indoor environment were Penicillium spp. (45.86%) which was followed by Cladosporium spp. (31.92%), Aspergillus section Nigri (6.26%), sterilized mycelia (5.05%), and Aspergillus section Flavi (2.83%). Cladosporium spp. (61.10 CFU/m) and Penicillium spp. (18.56 CFU/m) had the highest mean concentrations in outdoor and indoor air, respectively. The indoor-to-outdoor ratio of fungal aerosols was < 1 at most sampling sites, indicating that the indoor fungal bio-aerosols may have originated from the outdoor environment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10661-018-7183-4DOI Listing
January 2019

A review of the chemical and biological pollutants in indoor air in hospitals and assessing their effects on the health of patients, staff and visitors.

Rev Environ Health 2018 Sep;33(3):231-245

Associated Prof, Research Center for Health, Safety and Environment, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/reveh-2018-0011DOI Listing
September 2018

Implementation of continuously electro-generated FeO nanoparticles for activation of persulfate to decompose amoxicillin antibiotic in aquatic media: UV and ultrasound intensification.

J Environ Manage 2018 Oct 23;224:315-326. Epub 2018 Jul 23.

Environmental Health Research Center, Research Institute for Health Development, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Iran.

In the present investigation, the treatment of amoxicillin (AMX)-polluted water by the activated persulfate (PS) was considered. As a novel research, continuously electro-generated magnetite (FeO) nanoparticles (CEMNPs) were utilized as the activator of PS in an electrochemical medium. The PS/CEMNPs displayed a remarkable enhancement in the decomposition of AMX molecules up to 72.6% compared with lonely PS (24.8%) and CEMNPs (13.4%). On the basis of pseudo-first order reaction rate constants, the synergy percent of about 70% was achieved due to the combination of PS with CEMNPs. The adverse influence of free radical-scavenging compounds on the efficiency of the PS/CEMNPs process was in the following order: carbonate < chloride < tert-butyl alcohol < ethanol. Overall, these results proved the main role of free radical species in degrading AMX. The implementation of ultrasound (US) enhanced the performance of the PS/CEMNPs process. Nevertheless, the highest degradation efficiency of about 94% was achieved when UV lamp was joined the PS/CEMNPs system. Under UV and US irradiation, the results showed significant potential of the PS/CEMNPs process for degrading AMX antibiotic and generating low toxic effluent based on the activated sludge inhibition test. However, more time is needed to achieve the acceptable mineralization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2018.07.072DOI Listing
October 2018

The impact of air pollutants, UV exposure and geographic location on vitamin D deficiency.

Food Chem Toxicol 2018 Mar 1;113:241-254. Epub 2018 Feb 1.

Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public Health, Sabzevar University of Medical Sciences, Sabzevar, Iran. Electronic address:

Vitamin D (VD) is an important nutrient for preventing several chronic diseases, and vitamin D deficiency (VDD) causes many diseases. Air pollution has been reported as one of the most significant factors that causes VDD. Some epidemiological studies have evaluated VDD prevalence, and presented air pollution as a potential cause of VDD. In addition, recent case studies have found that VDD is associated with air pollutants. Nearly all reports agree that air pollution affects VD levels by reducing sun exposure, especially UVB radiation. Sun exposure accounts for >90% of VD production in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated that tropospheric ozone and particulate matter are independent risks to VD levels and cause deficiency. However, obtaining comprehensive conclusions on the impact of air pollution on VDD is necessary. This study aims to review all related papers to determine how air pollution can affect VD levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2018.01.052DOI Listing
March 2018