Publications by authors named "Hassan Farsam"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A Stability-Indicating HPLC Method for the Determination of Memantine Hydrochloride in Dosage Forms through Derivatization with 1-Fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene.

Sci Pharm 2014 Apr-Jun;82(2):265-79. Epub 2013 Dec 9.

Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Memantine is chemically a tricyclic amine and is used for Parkinson's disease and movement disorders. Although several HPLC methods with different derivatization reagents have been developed for the determination of memantine in biological fluids, there are some complications which limit the use of these methods in routine analysis of memantine in in vitro tests. We established a simple, sensitive, precise, and accurate HPLC method for the quantification of memantine in dosage forms. Pre-column derivatization of memantine was performed with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and the reaction product was separated on a Nova-Pak C18 column. A mixture of acetonitrile and sodium dihydrogenphosphate (pH 2.5; 0.05 M) (70: 30, v/v) was used as the mobile phase. UV detection was performed at 360 nm. Forced degradation studies were performed on a powdered tablet sample of memantine hydro-chloride using acidic (0.1 M hydrochloric acid), basic (0.1 M sodium hydroxide), oxidative (10% hydrogen peroxide), thermal (105°C), photolytic, and humidity conditions. Good linearity (r(2)=0.999) was obtained over the range of 1-12 μg mL(-1) of memantine hydrochloride with acceptable within-day and between-day precision values in the range of 0.05-0.95%. The proposed method was used for the assay determination and dissolution rate study of memantine dosage forms with excellent specificity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3797/scipharm.1310-09DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4065122PMC
June 2014

Screening of medicinal plants from Iranian traditional medicine for acetylcholinesterase inhibition.

Phytother Res 2011 Aug 2;25(8):1148-52. Epub 2011 Feb 2.

Department of Pharmacognosy, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

To find new herbal compounds with an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory effect, this study focused on herbal drugs and resins which have been used in Iranian traditional medicine for the treatment of cognitive disorders. Forty drugs were selected from authoritative written documents of Iranian traditional medicine. Each drug was extracted by accelerated solvent extraction using dichloromethane followed by methanol. The 80 extracts were screened for AChE inhibitory activity by a TLC bioautography method. The inhibiting effect of the 32 most active extracts was measured by a microplate colorimetric assay. Due to the best activity, the seeds of Peganum harmala L. were investigated in detail. From the TLC bioautography assay the alkaloids harmaline and harmine were identified as active compounds. This result was confirmed by means of HPLC-DAD. The IC(50) values were 41.2 μg/mL for the methanol extract, 95.5 μg/mL for the dichloromethane extract, 8.4 μg/mL for harmaline and 10.9 μg/mL for harmine. The concentrations of active compounds in the extracts were determined by a fast and precise HPLC method. As the amounts of harmaline and harmine in the extracts were correlated with the IC(50) values of the extracts, it can be concluded that these two alkaloids are responsible for the AChE inhibitory activity of P. harmala.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.3409DOI Listing
August 2011

Association of saliva fluoride level and socioeconomic factors with dental caries in 3-6 years old children in tehran-iran.

Iran J Pharm Res 2011 ;10(1):159-66

Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Centre, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, 14155-6451, Tehran, Iran.

Previous studies have indicated that there may be a relationship between the salivary fluoride concentrations and dental caries while the emphasis was on dental caries in permanent teeth. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of dental caries and its predictors in 3-6 year-old children in Tehran, Iran. The other objective of this investigation was to clarify a relationship between salivary fluoride levels of the studied children and their socioeconomic situations. The study population consisted of 205 children aged 3-6 years living in Tehran. Each child was examined for dental caries (decayed missing filled teeth (DMFT)) and unstimulated whole mixed saliva was collected 2 h post-prandial. All of the saliva samples were analyzed for fluoride concentration using an ion-specific electrode. The children were then grouped according to their DMFT, salivary fluoride levels (ppm) and socioeconomic factors (parent's education and occupation) that resulted in a statistically significant relationship. The children with (DMFT < 1) were shown to have a significantly higher salivary fluoride level (p < 0.001) than prone children caries (DMFT > 1). The obtained results indicated that the caries prevalence among 3-6 year-old children in Tehran - the capital of the Islamic republic of Iran - is as low compared with those, living in developed countries.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3869581PMC
December 2013

Brief History of pharmacy ethics in Iran.

Authors:
Hassan Farsam

J Med Ethics Hist Med 2009 30;2:13. Epub 2009 Jul 30.

Pharmacy is an ethical profession. The aim of this study was to investigate the history of pharmacy ethics in Iran. In the ancient Persia, medical and pharmaceutical ethics were related to religious rules, and everybody had to respect it. The ethical rules were similar to some current pharmacy ethics. During Islamic era, the pharmacy ethics were edited according to the Islamic rules. After introduction of European pharmacy into Iran, the pharmacy ethics did not change and was regarded as before. By presentation of bioethics and medical ethics in recent years, new activities are carried out for better manipulation of their rules in health professions including pharmacy.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3713903PMC
August 2013

A rapid derivative spectrophotometric method for simultaneous determination of naphazoline and antazoline in eye drops.

Chem Pharm Bull (Tokyo) 2006 Jan;54(1):119-22

Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.

A zero-crossing first-derivative spectrophotometric method is applied for the simultaneous determination of naphazoline hydrochloride and antazoline phosphate in eye drops. The measurements were carried out at wavelengths of 225 and 252 nm for naphazoline hydrochloride and antazoline phosphate, respectively. The method was found to be linear (r2>0.999) in the range of 0.2-1 microg/ml for naphazoline hydrochloride in the presence of 5 microg/ml antazoline phosphate at 225 nm. The same linear correlation (r2>0.999) was obtained in the range of 1-10 microg/ml of antazoline phosphate in the presence of 0.5 microg/ml of naphazoline hydrochloride at 252 nm. The limit of determination was 0.2 microg/ml and 1 microg/ml for naphazoline hydrochloride and antazoline phosphate, respectively. The method was successfully used for simultaneous analysis of naphazoline hydrochloride and antazoline phosphate in eye drops without any interference from excipients and prior separation before analysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1248/cpb.54.119DOI Listing
January 2006

Simultaneous determination of cyproterone acetate and ethinylestradiol in tablets by derivative spectrophotometry.

Chem Pharm Bull (Tokyo) 2005 Aug;53(8):949-51

Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (14155-6451), Iran.

Derivative spectrophotometry offers a useful approach for the analysis of drugs in multi-component mixtures. In this study a third-derivative spectrophotometric method was used for simultaneous determination of cyproterone acetate and ethinylestradiol using the zero-crossing technique. The measurements were carried out at wavelengths of 316 and 226 nm for cyproterone acetate and ethinylestradiol respectively. The method was found to be linear (r2>0.999) in the range of 0.5-6 mg/100 ml for cyproterone acetate in the presence of 35 microg/100 ml ethinylestsradiol at 316 nm. The same linear correlation (r2>0.999) was obtained in the range of 10-80 microg/100 ml of ethinylestradiol in the presence of 2 mg/100 ml of cyproterone acetate at 226 nm. The limit of determination was 0.5 mg/100 ml and 10 microg/100 ml for cyproterone acetate and ethinylestradiol respectively. The method was successfully applied for simultaneous determination of cyproterone acetate and ethinylestradiol in pharmaceutical preparations without any interferences from excipients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1248/cpb.53.949DOI Listing
August 2005

An anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Satureja khuzistanica Jamzad extract.

J Pharm Pharm Sci 2005 Apr 20;8(1):102-6. Epub 2005 Apr 20.

Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Purpose: Satureja khuzistanica Jamzad (Lamiaceae) is an endemic plant that widely distributed in the southern parts of Iran. This plant has been used as analgesic and antiseptic among the inhabitants of southern parts of Iran.

Methods: The Satureja khuzistanica hydroalcoholic extract was prepared and its anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects were investigated using the carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and formalin test.

Results: A similar anti-inflammatory activity was seen between S. khuzistanica hydroalcoholic extract (150 mg/kg; i.p.) and indomethacin (4 mg/kg; i.p.) in carrageenan test. The extract showed anti-nociceptive activity in a dose-dependent (10-150 mg/kg; i.p.) manner at the second phase of formalin test which was comparable with morphine (3 mg/kg; i.p.).

Conclusion: This study confirms that anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive properties of S. khuzistanica are comparable to those of indomethacin and morphine. Presence of flavonoids, steroids, essential oil, mainly carvacrol and tannin might be responsible for anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of this plant.
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April 2005

Homocysteine alterations in experimental cholestasis and its subsequent cirrhosis.

Life Sci 2005 Apr;76(21):2497-512

Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 13145-784, Tehran, Iran.

Homocysteine (Hcy), an intermediate in methionine metabolism, has been proposed to be involved in hepatic fibrogenesis. Impaired liver function can alter Hcy metabolism. The aim of the present study was to determine plasma Hcy alterations in acute obstructive cholestasis and the subsequent biliary cirrhosis. Cholestasis was induced by bile duct ligation and sham-operated and unoperated rats were used as controls. The animals were studied on the days 7th, 14th, 21st and 28th after the operation. Plasma Hcy, cysteine, methionine, nitric oxide (NO) and liver S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM), S-adenosyl-homocysteine (SAH), SAM to SAH ratio and glutathione were measured. Chronic L-NAME treatment was also included in the study. Plasma Hcy concentrations were transiently elevated by the day 14th after bile duct ligation (P < 0.01) and subsequently returned to control levels. Similar relative fluctuations in plasma Hcy were observed in BDL rats after intraperitoneal methionine overload. Plasma methionine, cysteine and nitrite and nitrate were significantly increased after bile duct ligation. SAM to SAH ratio was diminished by the 1st week of cholestasis and remained significantly decreased throughout the study. These events were accompanied by a decrease in GSH to GSSG ratio in the liver. Chronic L-NAME treatment improved SAM to SAH ratio and prevented the elevation of plasma Hcy and methionine (P < 0.05) while couldn't influence the other parameters. In conclusion, this study demonstrates alterations in plasma Hcy and liver SAM and SAH contents in precirrhotic stages and in secondary biliary cirrhosis, for the first time. In addition, we observed that plasma Hcy concentrations in BDL rats follow a distinct pattern of alteration from what has been previously reported in other models of cirrhosis. NO overproduction may contribute to plasma Hcy elevation and liver SAM depletion after cholestasis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lfs.2004.12.009DOI Listing
April 2005

Determination of celecoxib in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography.

J Pharm Biomed Anal 2004 May;35(3):665-70

Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

A high performance liquid chromatographic method for the quantitation of celecoxib (CEL) in human plasma is presented. The method is based on liquid-liquid extraction with chloroform and reversed-phase chromatography using a Nucleosil CN column (250 mm x 4.6 mm i.d., 5 microm particle size) and UV spectrophotometer detection at 260 nm. The mobile phase consists of acetonitrile:water (60:40 (v/v)). Flutamide was used as internal standard (IS). The assay was linear in the concentration range of 10-1000 ng/ml when 0.5 ml aliquots of plasma were extracted. Within-day and between-day precision expressed by relative standard deviation is less than 4% and inaccuracy does not exceed 3%. The assay was used to analyze samples collected during human clinical studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpba.2004.02.005DOI Listing
May 2004