Publications by authors named "Hasna Kanta"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Regulates Peripheral B Cell Receptor Revision, Polyreactivity, and B1 Cells in Lupus.

J Immunol 2016 Feb 15;196(4):1507-16. Epub 2016 Jan 15.

Division of Rheumatic Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204; Center for Immunology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390; and

C57BL/6 mice bearing the Sle2(z) lupus-susceptibility congenic interval on chromosome 4 display high titers of polyclonal autoantibodies with generalized B cell hyperactivity, hallmarks of systemic lupus erythematosus. In B6.Sle2(z)HEL(Ig).sHEL BCR-transgenic mice, Sle2(z) did not breach central tolerance, but it led to heightened expression of endogenous Ig H and L chains in splenic B cells, upregulation of RAG, and serological polyreactivity, suggestive of excessive receptor revision. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), a gene in the minimal subcongenic interval generated through recombinant mapping, was found to be upregulated in Sle2(z) B cells by microarray analysis, Western blot, and functional assays. Pharmacological inhibition of FAAH reversed the increase in receptor revision, RAG expression, and polyreactive autoantibodies in lupus-prone mice. These studies indicate that increased peripheral BCR revision, or selective peripheral expansion of BCR-revised B cells, may lead to systemic autoimmunity and that FAAH is a lupus-susceptibility gene that might regulate this process.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.1500291DOI Listing
February 2016

Shared signaling networks active in B cells isolated from genetically distinct mouse models of lupus.

J Clin Invest 2007 Aug;117(8):2186-96

Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390-8884, USA.

Though B cells play key roles in lupus pathogenesis, the molecular circuitry and its dysregulation in these cells as disease evolves remain poorly understood. To address this, a comprehensive scan of multiple signaling axes using multiplexed Western blotting was undertaken in several different murine lupus strains. PI3K/AKT/mTOR (mTOR, mammalian target of rapamycin), MEK1/Erk1/2, p38, NF-kappaB, multiple Bcl-2 family members, and cell-cycle molecules were observed to be hyperexpressed in lupus B cells in an age-dependent and lupus susceptibility gene-dose-dependent manner. Therapeutic targeting of the AKT/mTOR axis using a rapamycin (sirolimus) derivative ameliorated the serological, cellular, and pathological phenotypes associated with lupus. Surprisingly, the targeting of this axis was associated with the crippling of several other signaling axes. These studies reveal that lupus pathogenesis is contingent upon the activation of an elaborate network of signaling cascades that is shared among genetically distinct mouse models and raise hope that targeting pivotal nodes in these networks may offer therapeutic benefit.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/JCI30398DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1913486PMC
August 2007

Suppressor analysis of a histone defect identifies a new function for the hda1 complex in chromosome segregation.

Genetics 2006 May 16;173(1):435-50. Epub 2006 Jan 16.

Department of Biological Sciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville 72701, USA.

Histones are essential for the compaction of DNA into chromatin and therefore participate in all chromosomal functions. Specific mutations in HTA1, one of the two Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes encoding histone H2A, have been previously shown to cause chromosome segregation defects, including an increase in ploidy associated with altered pericentromeric chromatin structure, suggesting a role for histone H2A in kinetochore function. To identify proteins that may interact with histone H2A in the control of ploidy and chromosome segregation, we performed a genetic screen for suppressors of the increase-in-ploidy phenotype associated with one of the H2A mutations. We identified five genes, HHT1, MKS1, HDA1, HDA2, and HDA3, four of which encode proteins directly connected to chromatin function: histone H3 and each of the three subunits of the Hda1 histone deacetylase complex. Our results show that Hda3 has functions distinct from Hda2 and Hda1 and that it is required for normal chromosome segregation and cell cycle progression. In addition, HDA3 shows genetic interactions with kinetochore components, emphasizing a role in centromere function, and all three Hda proteins show association with centromeric DNA. These findings suggest that the Hda1 deacetylase complex affects histone function at the centromere and that Hda3 has a distinctive participation in chromosome segregation. Moreover, these suppressors provide the basis for future studies regarding histone function in chromosome segregation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1534/genetics.105.050559DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1461434PMC
May 2006