Publications by authors named "Hasan Namdar"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A Historical Review of Persian Medicine Studies into Saliva Manifestations for Potential Applications for Diagnosis and Management of Metabolic Syndrome.

Endocr Metab Immune Disord Drug Targets 2020 ;20(2):182-188

Department of Traditional Medicine, School of Traditional Medicine. Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background And Objectives: Regarding the development of diagnostic tests based on saliva and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS), the aim of this study is to review Persian Medicine manuscripts in the field of saliva manifestations, its relation to metabolic syndrome, and treatment recommendations.

Methods: This study is a mini-review. We investigated the canon of medicine and some important Persian medical or pharmaceutical manuscripts from the 9th to the 19th centuries. PubMed and Google Scholar databases were explored for finding relevant information about the relationship between saliva and metabolic syndrome and its treatment.

Results: Studies have suggested that maldigestion is one of the important causes of MetS. Sialorrhea may be an early symptom of maldigestion. Attention to sialorrhea and its treatment may be useful in the prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome based on PM sources. In PM, sialorrhea is treated with 3 major approaches: lifestyle modification along with simple or compound medicines.

Conclusion: Saliva manifestations could be considered as early symptoms of metabolic syndrome. As mentioned in WHO strategies, traditional medicine can be used along with modern medicine due to its effectiveness in the management of various ailments.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1871530319666190618155801DOI Listing
November 2020

Cytokine profile and nitric oxide levels in macrophages exposed to Leishmania infantum FML.

Exp Parasitol 2019 Aug 22;203:1-7. Epub 2019 May 22.

Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran; Student Research Committee, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran.

Fucose-mannose ligand (FML) is a soluble antigen purified from Leishmania donovani complex and used for diagnosis, prognosis, and vaccine development against visceral leishmaniasis (VL). We aimed to explore the effects of FML on the production of cytokines, chemokines and nitric oxide (NO) by macrophages in vitro. Peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c mice were treated with various concentrations of FML purified from Leishmania infantum in the absence or presence of LPS Peritoneal macrophages. After 48hr, cell culture supernatants were recovered and the levels of TNF-α, IL-10, IL-12p70 and IP-10 measured by Sandwich ELISA and NO concentration by Griess reaction. We found that FML significantly increase NO, IL-12p70 and IP-10 production in both LPS-treated and untreated macrophages and increase IL-10 levels only in LPS-treated macrophages. However, FML could not alert TNF-α levels in both LPS-treated and untreated macrophages. Further analysis revealed that FML can also increase IL-12p70/IL-10 ratio in LPS-treated macrophages. We concluded that FML can polarize macrophages to an appropriate phenotype similar to M1 phenotype against Leishmania donovani complex, although IL10 and TNF results are controversial.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.exppara.2019.05.004DOI Listing
August 2019

Migraine associated with gastrointestinal disorders: A pathophysiological explanation.

Med Hypotheses 2019 Apr 19;125:90-93. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Department of Iranian Traditional Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran.

Background: Migraine is a highly prevalent, disabling, and costly disorder worldwide. From a long time ago, headaches have been known to be associated with gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. Headaches originating from gastric complaints were appreciated by Persian Medicine (PM) scholars. Today, functional GI disorders are shown to have high comorbidity with migraines; however, a causal relationship is not accepted today and pathophysiological explanations for this comorbidity are scarce. Therefore, based on the PM philosophy and the existing evidence, we aimed to propose an explanation for the co-morbidity of migraine and GI disorders.

Summary: Noxious stimuli from the GI tract are relayed to the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) in the brain stem, which is located close to the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). TNC has shown projections to (NTS) through which frequent GI stimuli may antidromically reach the TNC and finally result in neurogenic inflammation. In addition, immune products, particularly histamine, are released in the submucosa of the GI tract and absorbed into the systemic circulation, which renders migraineurs more prone to attacks.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mehy.2019.02.041DOI Listing
April 2019

Persian Traditional Medicine and Ocular Health.

Med Hypothesis Discov Innov Ophthalmol 2015 ;4(4):162-166

Department of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran.

The Persian Traditional Medicine (PTM) system pays special attention to disease prevention. In PTM, physicians believe that overeating may cause accumulation of unhealthy substances in the body and diseases called "Emtela." With respect to ocular health, foods can be categorized as beneficial and harmful. Harmful foods such as beef, geese, eggplant, cauliflower, and cheese can cause reduced vision. Dehydrating foods such as walnut and salty fish and hot foods such as garlic, onion, and pepper can cause dry eye. Food items that have beneficial effects on ocular health include thyme and saffron and fruits such as grape, fig, apple, plum, and berries. PTM stipulates that one should not drink water with meals or immediately afterwards, since drinking cold (icy) water causes difficulty in absorption of nutrients. Gulping water may have harmful effects on the eyes; therefore, PTM physicians recommend drinking water at a suitable temperature. It is not safe to drink water first at the morning. Sleeping right after eating is harmful too. Avicenna believes that sleeping on one's belly after a full meal is very harmful for the eyes. Galen says that old people need deep and continuous sleep more than others. From the view of PTM, moving eyes in different directions, making delicate expressions, trying to look at delicate and find pictures and reading small letters would remove ocular fatigue. There have been mentions of local medicine for improving vision as well; for instance, fennel extracts, pomegranate juice, and honey which are suitable for vision improvement. Local administration of pomegranate blossoms is suitable for treating inflammatory reactions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5087098PMC
January 2015

Avicenna's view on the prevention of thrombosis.

Int J Cardiol 2013 Oct 3;168(3):3093-4. Epub 2013 May 3.

Department of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2013.04.079DOI Listing
October 2013

Evaluation of the Effect of the 47 kDa Protein Isolated from Aged Garlic Extract on Dendritic Cells.

Iran J Basic Med Sci 2012 Mar;15(2):745-51

Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran.

Objectives: Garlic (Allium sativum) is known as a potent spice and a medicine with broad therapeutic properties ranging from antibacterial to anticancer, and anticoagulant. One of the major purified garlic protein components is the 47 kDa protein. In this study, the effect of 47 kDa protein extracted from aged garlic (AGE) was evalua.

Materials And Methods: Forty seven kDa protein was purified from AGE by ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel filtration. SDS-PAGE was used to determine the molecular weight and purity of the isolated protein. DCs were purified from spleen of BALB/c mice by Nycodenz centrifugation and their adhesiveness to the plastic dish. The 47 kDa protein isolated from AGE was added to DCs medium during the overnight culture and the expression of DC surface markers was assessed via flowcytometry.

Results: The 47 kDa protein-treated DCs lowered the expression of DC maturation markers including: CD40, CD86 and MHC-II in comparison with non-treated DCs; (median of 41% versus 47%, 84% versus 91% and 83% versus 90%, respectively) but we observed no statistical difference between the two groups.

Conclusion: Upon treatment with DCs with 47 kDa protein, DCs down regulated the expression of costimulatory and MHC-II surface molecules, which is similar to tolerogenic DC phenotype. According to the results of the present study, we found that 47 kDa protein purified from AGE can be considered as a potential candidate to generate tolerogenic DCs in vitro.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3586875PMC
March 2012