Publications by authors named "Haruka Hiyama"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

MrgprB4 in trigeminal neurons expressing TRPA1 modulates unpleasant sensations.

J Pharmacol Sci 2021 Aug 28;146(4):200-205. Epub 2021 Apr 28.

Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, 46-29 Yoshida-Shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan.

Gentle touch such as stroking of the skin produces a pleasant feeling, which is detected by a rare subset of sensory neurons that express Mas-related G protein-coupled receptor B4 (MrgprB4) in mice. We examined small populations of MrgprB4-positive neurons in the trigeminal ganglion and the dorsal root ganglion, and most of these were sensitive to transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) agonist but not TRPV1, TRPM8, or TRPV4 agonists. Deficiency of MrgprB4 did not affect noxious pain or itch behaviors in the hairless plantar and hairy cheek. Although behavior related to acetone-induced cold sensing in the hind paw was not changed, unpleasant sensory behaviors in response to acetone application or sucrose splash to the cheek were significantly enhanced in Mrgprb4-knockout mice as well as in TRPA1-knockout mice. These results suggest that MrgprB4 in the trigeminal neurons produces pleasant sensations in cooperation with TRPA1, rather than noxious or cold sensations. Pleasant sensations may modulate unpleasant sensations on the cheek via MrgprB4.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jphs.2021.04.006DOI Listing
August 2021

TRPA1 sensitization during diabetic vascular impairment contributes to cold hypersensitivity in a mouse model of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

Mol Pain 2018 Jan-Dec;14:1744806918789812. Epub 2018 Jul 3.

1 Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Japan.

Background Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common long-term complication of diabetes. Accumulating evidence suggests that vascular impairment plays important roles in the pathogenesis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, while the mechanism remains unclear. We recently reported that transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is sensitized by hypoxia, which can contribute to cold hypersensitivity. In this study, we investigated the involvement of TRPA1 and vascular impairment in painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy using streptozotocin-induced diabetic model mice. Results Streptozotocin-induced diabetic model mice showed mechanical and cold hypersensitivity with a peak at two weeks after the streptozotocin administration, which were likely to be paralleled with the decrease in the skin blood flow of the hindpaw. Streptozotocin-induced cold hypersensitivity was significantly inhibited by an antagonist HC-030031 (100 mg/kg) or deficiency for TRPA1, whereas mechanical hypersensitivity was unaltered. Consistent with these results, the nocifensive behaviors evoked by an intraplantar injection of the TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) were enhanced two weeks after the streptozotocin administration. Both streptozotocin-induced cold hypersensitivity and the enhanced AITC-evoked nocifensive behaviors were significantly inhibited by a vasodilator, tadalafil (10 mg/kg), with recovery of the decreased skin blood flow. Similarly, in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia induced by the ligation of the external iliac artery, AITC-evoked nocifensive behaviors were significantly enhanced three and seven days after the ischemic operation, whereas mechanical hypersensitivity was unaltered in TRPA1-knockout mice. However, no difference was observed between wild-type and TRPA1-knockout mice in the hyposensitivity for current or mechanical stimulation or the deceased density of intraepidermal nerve fibers eight weeks after the streptozotocin administration. Conclusion These results suggest that TRPA1 sensitization during diabetic vascular impairment causes cold, but not mechanical, hypersensitivity in the early painful phase of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. However, TRPA1 may play little or no role in the progression of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1744806918789812DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6055098PMC
December 2018

Colchicine alleviates acute postoperative pain but delays wound repair in mice: roles of neutrophils and macrophages.

Mol Pain 2017 Jan-Dec;13:1744806917743680

Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, 46-29 Yoshida-Shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan.

Background: Acute postoperative pain is induced by most incisional surgeries and usually resolves with wound repair. However, many patients experience moderate to severe pain despite receiving currently available postoperative pain relief. Accumulating evidence suggests that inflammatory cells, neutrophils, and macrophages infiltrating the wound site contribute to the acute inflammation, pain, and subsequent wound repair. Colchicine is commonly used to relieve pain in gout by inhibiting the infiltration of granulocytes and other motile cells. In this study, we examined the effects of colchicine on acute postoperative pain and wound repair by correlating the infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages in a mouse model of postoperative pain induced by plantar incision. Furthermore, these effects of colchicine were compared with clodronate liposomes, which selectively deplete circulating macrophages.

Results: Plantar incision induced mechanical hypersensitivity in the ipsilateral hind paw that peaked one day and lasted for three days after the surgery. Treatment with colchicine significantly attenuated the early infiltration of Gr1-positive cells (neutrophils) around the incision site and mechanical hypersensitivity, which was accompanied with inhibition of the subsequent infiltration of Iba1-positive cells (macrophages) and macrophage polarization toward the proinflammatory M1 phenotype. By contrast, an intravenous injection of clodronate liposomes significantly inhibited the infiltration of macrophages around the incision site but had little effect on the infiltration of neutrophils or mechanical hypersensitivity. Importantly, colchicine treatment significantly delayed wound closure after the incisional surgery, whereas clodronate liposome administration had no effect on wound closure.

Conclusion: These results suggest that colchicine can alleviate acute postoperative pain and also enhance the risk of delayed wound repair, which are associated with the suppression of neutrophil and subsequent proinflammatory M1 macrophage infiltration around the incision site, while the involvement of macrophages may be limited.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1744806917743680DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5692123PMC
September 2018

Hypoxia-induced sensitisation of TRPA1 in painful dysesthesia evoked by transient hindlimb ischemia/reperfusion in mice.

Sci Rep 2016 Mar 17;6:23261. Epub 2016 Mar 17.

Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, 46-29 Yoshida-Shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan.

Dysesthesia is an unpleasant abnormal sensation, which is often accompanied by peripheral neuropathy or vascular impairment. Here, we examined the roles of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) in dysesthesia-like behaviours elicited by transient hindlimb ischemia (15-60 min) by tightly compressing the hindlimb, and reperfusion by releasing the ligature. The paw-withdrawal responses to tactile stimulation were reduced during ischemia and lasted for a while after reperfusion. Hindlimb ischemia/reperfusion elicited spontaneous licking of the ischemic hindpaw that peaked within 10 min. The licking was inhibited by reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers, a TRPA1 antagonist, or TRPA1 deficiency, but not by TRPV1 deficiency. In human TRPA1-expressing cells as well as cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, the H2O2-evoked TRPA1 response was significantly increased by pretreatment with hypoxia (80 mmHg) for 30 min. This hypoxia-induced TRPA1 sensitisation to H2O2 was inhibited by overexpressing a catalytically-inactive mutant of prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) 2 or in a TRPA1 proline mutant resistant to PHDs. Consistent with these results, a PHD inhibitor increased H2O2-evoked nocifensive behaviours through TRPA1 activation. Our results suggest that transient hindlimb ischemia/reperfusion-evoked spontaneous licking, i.e. painful dysesthesia, is caused by ROS-evoked activation of TRPA1 sensitised by hypoxia through inhibiting PHD-mediated hydroxylation of a proline residue in TRPA1.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep23261DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4794653PMC
March 2016
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