Publications by authors named "Harminder S Sidhu"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Crop nutrient management using Nutrient Expert improves yield, increases farmers' income and reduces greenhouse gas emissions.

Sci Rep 2021 Jan 15;11(1):1564. Epub 2021 Jan 15.

African Plant Nutrition Institute (APNI), & Univerśite Mohammed VI Polytechnique, Benguérir, Morocco.

Reduction of excess nutrient application and balanced fertilizer use are the key mitigation options in agriculture. We evaluated Nutrient Expert (NE) tool-based site-specific nutrient management (SSNM) in rice and wheat crops by establishing 1594 side-by-side comparison trials with farmers' fertilization practices (FFP) across the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) of India. We found that NE-based fertilizer management can lower global warming potential (GWP) by about 2.5% in rice, and between 12 and 20% in wheat over FFP. More than 80% of the participating farmers increased their crop yield and farm income by applying the NE-based fertilizer recommendation. We also observed that increased crop yield and reduced fertilizer consumption and associated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by using NE was significantly influenced by the crop type, agro-ecology, soil properties and farmers' current level of fertilization. Adoption of NE-based fertilizer recommendation practice in all rice and wheat acreage in India would translate into 13.92 million tonnes (Mt) more rice and wheat production with 1.44 Mt less N fertilizer use, and a reduction in GHG of 5.34 Mt COe per year over farmers' current practice. Our study establishes the utility of NE to help implement SSNM in smallholder production systems for increasing crop yields and farmers' income while reducing GHG emissions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-79883-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7810863PMC
January 2021

Re-designing irrigated intensive cereal systems through bundling precision agronomic innovations for transitioning towards agricultural sustainability in North-West India.

Sci Rep 2019 11 29;9(1):17929. Epub 2019 Nov 29.

International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), New Delhi, India.

A study was conducted to design productive, profitable, irrigation water¸ nitrogen and energy use efficient intensive cereal systems (rice-wheat; RW and maize-wheat; MW) in North-West India. Bundling of conservation agriculture (CA) with sub-surface drip irrigation termed as CA were compared with CA alone and conventional tillage based and flood irrigated RW rotation (farmer's practice; ScI). In contrast to conventional till RW rotation which consumed 1889 mm ha irrigation water (2-yr mean), CA system saved 58.4 and 95.5% irrigation water in RW and MW rotations, respectively. CA practices saved 45.8 and 22.7% of irrigation water in rice and maize, respectively compared to CA with flood irrigation. On a system basis, CA practices saved 46.7 and 44.7% irrigation water under RW (ScV) and MW (ScVI) systems compared to their respective CA-based systems with flood irrigation (ScIII and ScIV). CA in RW system recorded 11.2% higher crop productivity and improved irrigation water productivity by 145% and profitability by 29.2% compared to farmers' practice. Substitution of rice with maize (MW system; ScVI) recorded 19.7% higher productivity, saved 84.5% of irrigation water and increased net returns by 48.9% compared to farmer's practice. CA RW and MW system improved energy productivity by 75 and 169% and partial factor productivity of N by 44.6 and 49.6%, respectively compared to ScI. The sub-surface drip irrigation system saved the fertilizer N by 20% under CA systems. CA in RW and MW systems recorded ~13 and 5% (2-yr mean) higher profitability with 80% subsidy on installing sub-surface drip irrigation system and similar profitability without subsidy scenario compared with their respective flood irrigated CA-based systems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-54086-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6884493PMC
November 2019

Harnessing genetic potential of wheat germplasm banks through impact-oriented-prebreeding for future food and nutritional security.

Sci Rep 2018 08 21;8(1):12527. Epub 2018 Aug 21.

ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, Regional Station, Shimla, 171004, India.

The value of exotic wheat genetic resources for accelerating grain yield gains is largely unproven and unrealized. We used next-generation sequencing, together with multi-environment phenotyping, to study the contribution of exotic genomes to 984 three-way-cross-derived (exotic/elite1//elite2) pre-breeding lines (PBLs). Genomic characterization of these lines with haplotype map-based and SNP marker approaches revealed exotic specific imprints of 16.1 to 25.1%, which compares to theoretical expectation of 25%. A rare and favorable haplotype (GT) with 0.4% frequency in gene bank identified on chromosome 6D minimized grain yield (GY) loss under heat stress without GY penalty under irrigated conditions. More specifically, the 'T' allele of the haplotype GT originated in Aegilops tauschii and was absent in all elite lines used in study. In silico analysis of the SNP showed hits with a candidate gene coding for isoflavone reductase IRL-like protein in Ae. tauschii. Rare haplotypes were also identified on chromosomes 1A, 6A and 2B effective against abiotic/biotic stresses. Results demonstrate positive contributions of exotic germplasm to PBLs derived from crosses of exotics with CIMMYT's best elite lines. This is a major impact-oriented pre-breeding effort at CIMMYT, resulting in large-scale development of PBLs for deployment in breeding programs addressing food security under climate change scenarios.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-30667-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6104032PMC
August 2018