Dr. Hao Peng, PhD - Washington State University - Research Scientist

Dr. Hao Peng

PhD

Washington State University

Research Scientist

Pullman, Washington | United States

Main Specialties: Biology

Additional Specialties: Plant Biology, Crop Biotechnology

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-1915-6104

Dr. Hao Peng, PhD - Washington State University - Research Scientist

Dr. Hao Peng

PhD

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: Washington State University - Pullman, Washington , United States

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:

Education

Jan 2011 - Aug 2015
Washington State University
Ph.D. Crop Science
Department of Crop and Soil Sciences

Experience

Dec 2015
Acta Physiologiae Plantarum
Associate Editor

Publications

7Publications

767Reads

23Profile Views

Putative Auxin and Light Responsive Promoter Elements From the Genome, When Expressed as cDNA, Are Functional in .

Front Plant Sci 2019 28;10:804. Epub 2019 Jun 28.

Department of Plant Pathology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, United States.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2019.00804DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6611158PMC
June 2019
2 Reads
3.637 Impact Factor

, a Conserved () From Soybean, Positively Regulates Plant Resistance Against Pathogens.

Front Plant Sci 2019 8;10:107. Epub 2019 Feb 8.

Department of Plant Pathology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China.

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https://www.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpls.2019.00107/
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2019.00107DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6376896PMC
February 2019
2 Reads
3.637 Impact Factor

ATAF2 integrates Arabidopsis brassinosteroid inactivation and seedling photomorphogenesis.

Development 2015 Dec 22;142(23):4129-38. Epub 2015 Oct 22.

Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA Molecular Plant Science Graduate Program, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA

The Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyl is a robust system for studying the interplay of light and plant hormones, such as brassinosteroids (BRs), in the regulation of plant growth and development. Since BRs cannot be transported between plant tissues, their cellular levels must be appropriate for given developmental fates. BR homeostasis is maintained in part by transcriptional feedback regulation loops that control the expression of key metabolic enzymes, including the BR-inactivating enzymes BAS1 (CYP734A1, formerly CYP72B1) and SOB7 (CYP72C1). Here, we find that the NAC transcription factor (TF) ATAF2 binds the promoters of BAS1 and SOB7 to suppress their expression. ATAF2 restricts the tissue-specific expression of BAS1 and SOB7 in planta. ATAF2 loss- and gain-of-function seedlings have opposite BR-response phenotypes for hypocotyl elongation. ATAF2 modulates hypocotyl growth in a light-dependent manner, with the photoreceptor phytochrome A playing a major role. The photomorphogenic phenotypes of ATAF2 loss- and gain-of-function seedlings are suppressed by treatment with the BR biosynthesis inhibitor brassinazole. Moreover, the disruption of BAS1 and SOB7 abolishes the short-hypocotyl phenotype of ATAF2 loss-of-function seedlings in low fluence rate white light, demonstrating an ATAF2-mediated connection between BR catabolism and photomorphogenesis. ATAF2 expression is suppressed by both BRs and light, which demonstrates the existence of an ATAF2-BAS1/SOB7-BR-ATAF2 feedback regulation loop, as well as a light-ATAF2-BAS1/SOB7-BR-photomorphogenesis pathway. ATAF2 also modulates root growth by regulating BR catabolism. As it is known to regulate plant defense and auxin biosynthesis, ATAF2 therefore acts as a central regulator of plant defense, hormone metabolism and light-mediated seedling development.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.124347DOI Listing
December 2015
700 Reads
6.462 Impact Factor

Arabidopsis thaliana AHL family modulates hypocotyl growth redundantly by interacting with each other via the PPC/DUF296 domain.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2013 Nov 11;110(48):E4688-97. Epub 2013 Nov 11.

Molecular Plant Sciences Graduate Program and Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.

The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes 29 AT-hook motif containing nuclear localized (AHL) genes, which evolved into two phylogenic clades. The AHL proteins contain one or two AT-hook motif(s) and one plant and prokaryote conserved (PPC)/domain of unknown function #296 (DUF296) domain. Seedlings lacking both SOB3/AHL29 and ESC/AHL27 confer a subtle long-hypocotyl phenotype compared with the WT or either single-null mutant. In contrast, the missense allele sob3-6 confers a dramatic long-hypocotyl phenotype in the light. In this study, we examined the dominant-negative feature of sob3-6 and found that it encodes a protein with a disrupted AT-hook motif that abolishes binding to AT-rich DNA. A loss-of-function approach demonstrated different, yet redundant, contributions of additional AHL genes in suppressing hypocotyl elongation in the light. We showed that AHL proteins interact with each other and themselves via the PPC/DUF296 domain. AHLs also share interactions with other nuclear proteins, such as transcription factors, suggesting that these interactions also contribute to the functional redundancy within this gene family. The coordinated action of AHLs requires an AT-hook motif capable of binding AT-rich DNA, as well as a PPC/DUF296 domain containing a conserved Gly-Arg-Phe-Glu-Ile-Leu region. Alteration of this region abolished SOB3/AHL29's physical interaction with transcription factors and resulted in a dominant-negative allele in planta that was phenotypically similar to sob3-6. We propose a molecular model where AHLs interact with each other and themselves, as well as other nuclear proteins, to form complexes which modulate plant growth and development.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1219277110DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3845178PMC
November 2013
20 Reads
9.809 Impact Factor

Rice CYP734A cytochrome P450s inactivate brassinosteroids in Arabidopsis.

Planta 2011 Dec 7;234(6):1151-62. Epub 2011 Jul 7.

Department of Biology, The College of New Jersey, 2000 Pennington Rd, Ewing, NJ 08628, USA.

Endogenous brassinosteroid concentrations are an important target for optimizing the growth of crop plants because these hormones influence yield and stress tolerance. The CYP734A subfamily of cytochrome P450 enzymes has been shown to inactivate brassinosteroid hormones in Arabidopsis and tomato. Rice has three genes for CYP734A enzymes whose expression appears to be up-regulated by exogenous brassinolide. The amino acids predicted to be in the active site of the rice enzymes vary when compared with the Arabidopsis protein sequence, suggesting that there could be differences in their ability to inactivate the hormone. We have cloned three CYP734A rice genes and expressed them in Arabidopsis to assess their efficacy as brassinosteroid-inactivating enzymes. We found that incorrect transcript splicing can complicate the expression of monocot genomic clones in a eudicot. However, the Arabidopsis system allowed us to characterize an atypical splice variant in one of the rice genes. cDNA clones produced high levels of expression and conferred the brassinosteroid inactivation phenotype. This study shows that Arabidopsis is a useful heterologous system for testing plant genes predicted to act in biochemical pathways that are conserved between monocots and eudicots.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00425-011-1464-2DOI Listing
December 2011
9 Reads
3.263 Impact Factor

Arabidopsis CYP72C1 is an atypical cytochrome P450 that inactivates brassinosteroids.

Plant Mol Biol 2010 Sep 30;74(1-2):167-81. Epub 2010 Jul 30.

Department of Biology, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, 08628, USA.

Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are a diverse family of proteins that have specialized roles in secondary metabolism and in normal cell development. Two P450s in particular, CYP734A1 and CYP72C1, have been identified as brassinosteroid-inactivating enzymes important for steroid-mediated signal transduction in Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetic analyses have demonstrated that these P450s modulate growth throughout plant development. While members of the CYP734A subfamily inactivate brassinosteroids through C-26 hydroxylation, the biochemical activity of CYP72C1 is unknown. Because CYP734A1 and CYP72C1 in Arabidopsis diverge more than brassinosteroid inactivating P450s in other plants, this study examines the structure and biochemistry of each enzyme. Three-dimensional models were generated to examine the substrate binding site structures and determine how they might affect the function of each P450. These models have indicated that the active site of CYP72C1 does not contain several conserved amino acids typically needed for substrate hydroxylation. Heterologous expression of these P450s followed by substrate binding analyses have indicated that CYP734A1 binds active brassinosteroids, brassinolide and castasterone, as well as their upstream precursors whereas CYP72C1 binds precursors more effectively. Seedling growth assays have demonstrated that the genetic state of CYP734A1, but not CYP72C1, affected responsiveness to high levels of exogenous brassinolide supporting our observations that CYP72C1 acts on brassinolide precursors. Although there may be some overlap in their physiological function, the distinct biochemical functions of these proteins in Arabidopsis has significant potential to fine-tune the levels of different brassinosteroid hormones throughout plant growth and development.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11103-010-9663-yDOI Listing
September 2010
23 Reads
4.257 Impact Factor

A putative leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase, OsBRR1, is involved in rice blast resistance.

Planta 2009 Jul 26;230(2):377-85. Epub 2009 May 26.

Biotechnology Research Institute, National Key Facility for Crop Gene Resources and Genetic Improvement, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, No. 12 Zhongguancun South Street, 100081, Beijing, China.

Leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs) comprise the largest subfamily of transmembrane receptor-like kinases in plants, and they regulate a wide variety of developmental and defense-related processes. In this study, RNA interference (RNAi) strategy was used to specifically knockdown 59 individual rice genes encoding putative LRR-RLKs, and a novel rice blast resistance-related gene (designated as OsBRR1) was identified by screening T(0) RNAi population using a weakly virulent isolate of Magnaporthe oryzae, Ken 54-04. Wild-type plants (Oryza sativa L. cv. 'Nipponbare') showed intermediate resistance to Ken 54-04, while OsBRR1 suppression plants were susceptible to Ken 54-04. Furthermore, OsBRR1-overexpressing plants exhibited enhanced resistance to some virulent isolates (97-27-2, 99-31-1 and zhong 10-8-14). OsBRR1 expression was low in leaves and undetectable in roots under normal growth conditions, while its transcript was significantly induced in leaves infected with the blast fungus (Ken 54-04) and was moderately affected by ABA, JA and SA treatment. Overexpression or RNAi suppression of OsBRR1 did not cause visible developmental changes in rice plants. These results indicate that OsBRR1 is involved in rice resistance responses to blast fungus and mediates resistance to rice blast.

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00425-009-0951-1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00425-009-0951-1DOI Listing
July 2009
11 Reads
3.263 Impact Factor

Top co-authors

Michael M Neff
Michael M Neff

Washington State University

5
Leeann E Thornton
Leeann E Thornton

Washington University

2
Ying Zhai
Ying Zhai

Shanghai Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism

2
Jianfei Zhao
Jianfei Zhao

National Cancer Institute

2
Yadong Li
Yadong Li

Tsinghua University

1
Qian Zhang
Qian Zhang

Key Laboratory of Endocrinology

1
Mary A Schuler
Mary A Schuler

University of Illinois

1
Cailin Lei
Cailin Lei

Nanjing Agricultural University

1
Xuehui Sun
Xuehui Sun

Biotechnology Research Institute

1
Tiegang Lu
Tiegang Lu

Biotechnology Research Institute

1