Publications by authors named "Hany Elbardesy"

7 Publications

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Does bicompartmental knee arthroplasty hold an advantage over total knee arthroplasty? Systematic review and meta-analysis.

SICOT J 2021 9;7:38. Epub 2021 Jul 9.

Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork T12DFK4, Ireland.

Introduction: The role of bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA) in the treatment of medial patellofemoral osteoarthritis (MPFOA) has been debated by orthopaedic surgeons for years. The BKA is a cruciate ligament retaining prosthesis designed to mimic the kinematics of the native knee that requires resurfacing of only two knee compartments. In this study, we aim to assess the patient recorded outcome measures (PROMs), range of motion (ROM), perioperative morbidity, and implant revision rate in patients undergoing BKA and compare them to those undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) for bicompartmental knee osteoarthritis (OA).

Patients And Methods: We followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses Statement (PRISMA). Articles from any country and written in any language were considered. We included all randomized control trials and retrospective cohort studies examining BKA versus TKA for bicompartmental knee OA. The primary outcome measure was knee society score (KSS) at one year and the secondary outcome measures were Oxford knee score (OKS) and short-form survey (SF-)12 at six and twelve months.

Results: We included five studies in our meta-analysis. In terms of OKS, KSS, and SF-12, our meta-analysis suggests better short-term results for the TKA compared with the BKA. TKA was also associated with a shorter operative time and a lower revision rate. The BKA implant did however result in marginally less intraoperative blood loss and slightly better post-operative ROM.

Conclusions: BKA did not prove to be an equivalent alternative to TKA in bicompartmental knee OA. It was associated with inferior KSS, OKS, and SF-12 at short-term follow-up and a higher revision rate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/sicotj/2021036DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8269451PMC
July 2021

The partial femoral condyle focal resurfacing (HemiCAP-UniCAP) for treatment of full-thickness cartilage defects, systematic review and meta-analysis.

Acta Orthop Belg 2021 Mar;87(1):93-102

Knee osteochondral defects are a common problem among people, especially young and active patients. So effective joint preserving surgeries is essential to prevent or even delay the onset of osteoarthritis for these group of patients. This study aims to critically appraise and evaluate the evidence for the results and effectiveness of femoral condyle resurfacing (HemiCAP/ UniCAP) in treatment of patients with focal femoral condyle cartilage defect. Using the search terms : HemiCAP, UniCAP, Episurf, focal, femoral, condyle, inlay and resur-facing, we reviewed the PubMed and EMBASE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) to find any articles published up to March 2020. The short term follow-up of the HemiCAP shows (6.74 %) revision rate. However, 29.13 % loss of follow up let us consider these results with caution especially if the revision rate progressively increased with time to 19.3 % in 5-7 years with no enough evidence for the long term results except the data from the Australian Joint Registry 2018, where the cumulative revision rate was 40.6 % (33.5, 48.4) at ten years. The UniCAP that used for defect more than 4 cm 2 has a high revision rate (53.66 %) which is considered unacceptable revision rate in com-parison to another similar prosthesis such as Uni-Knee Arthroplasty (UKA). The evidence from published studies and our meta- analysis suggests that partial resurfacing of the femoral condyle (HemiCAP) doesn't support its usage as a tool to treat the focal cartilage defect in middle- aged patients. The UniCAP as femoral condyle resurfacing has very high revision rate at 5-7 years (53.66 %) which make us recommend against its usage.
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March 2021

Subcuticular sutures versus staples for skin closure after primary hip arthroplasty.

Acta Orthop Belg 2021 Mar;87(1):55-64

High-quality and cost-effective health care are highly recommended especially in joint replacement surgeries, particularly in total hip arthroplasty. Therefore, it is indispensable for orthopaedic surgeons to spot the potential areas of quality improvement. Evaluating the efficacy of the different ways of skin closure is an unacknowledged topic. We performed this study following both the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta- analyses Statement (PRISMA) and the Cochrane Handbook for systematic reviews and meta-analysis. Articles were from any country, written in any language. We included all randomised control trials and retrospective cohort studies undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty who either received staples or subcuticular sutures for skin closure. The primary outcome was the incidence of wound infection. Secondary outcomes included length of stay (LOS), time to skin closure, total cost, and patient's satisfaction. We included five studies in our cumulative meta- analysis. We conducted them using Review Manager V.5.0. We computed the risk ratio as a measure of the treatment effect, taking into account heterogeneity. We used Random-effect models. Primary skin closure with subcuticular sutures had insignificant marginal advantages for wound infections, LOS, and wound oozing. On the contrary, staples were more cost- effective and had less time for closure with higher patient's satisfaction. Except for closure time and patient satisfaction , no significant difference between the two groups. The use of staples after THA may have several slight clinical advantages over the subcuticular sutures. However, owing to the complexities associated with wound closure, future clinical and laboratory studies assessing their complication outlines must be examined before an optimum technique can be determined.
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March 2021

Midterm results of modern patellofemoral arthroplasty versus total knee arthroplasty for isolated patellofemoral arthritis: systematic review and meta-analysis of comparative studies.

Arch Orthop Trauma Surg 2021 Apr 7. Epub 2021 Apr 7.

Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland.

Background: Both Patellofemoral Arthroplasty (PFA) and Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) are accepted surgical options for end-stage isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA). We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare outcomes of PFA and TKA by evaluation of the patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs).

Methods: We systematically identified publications reporting on patients that underwent either TKA or modern PFA for isolated PFOA. Meta-analysis software was used to screen for potential articles with at least two years' follow-up. Data were extracted and analysed for all PROMs operating time, postoperative inpatient time, complications and cost. We included five studies in our cumulative meta-analysis and reviewed them using Review Manager V.5.0. We computed the risk ratio as a measure of the treatment effect, taking into account heterogeneity. We used random-effect models.

Results: No significant difference was found between both TKA and PFA in the context of operating time. No significant difference after five years' follow-up was found between the two treatment options in terms of UCLA score and patient satisfaction. PFA showed significant improvement in WOMAC score at five-year follow-up, less postoperative inpatient time, better cost-effectiveness and significantly less blood loss.

Conclusion: PFA seems to be a viable alternative to TKA for treatment of isolated PFOA in appropriately selected patients. PFA showed less postoperative inpatient time and blood loss with similar PROMs to the TKA. Moreover, it is an economically beneficial joint-preserving procedure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00402-021-03882-4DOI Listing
April 2021

Locked pubis symphysis in a skeletally immature patient, a case report.

Trauma Case Rep 2021 Apr 20;32:100441. Epub 2021 Feb 20.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin 7, Dublin, Ireland.

Background: Locked symphysis pubis is an exceedingly rare pelvic injury especially in the paediatric population. This study is the first to describe this fracture in a skeletally immature patient.

Case Report: We report the case of a fifteen year old boy who presented to the Emergency Department (ED) after being involved in a farming injury with a left lateral compression pelvic trauma. He sustained Locked Symphysis Pubis (LSP) and internal pelvic bleeding from the right Internal Iliac Artery (IIA). He was treated successfully by selective embolization of the ILA followed by closed reduction of the LSP and percutaneous fixation of the SI joint.

Conclusion: Locked symphysis pubis in the paediatric population is an exceedingly rare injury among lateral compression type pelvic fractures. Careful assessment and preoperative management planning are encouraged. Open packing of the pelvis in case of internal bleeding should be avoided in paediatric patients, only selective embolization is advocated. Closed reduction of the LSP by using the external fixator as a lever arm for reduction followed by percutaneous fixation of the SI joint. Moreover, changing the patient position to prone position followed by posterior lumbar spine stabilisation is our preferred method of treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tcr.2021.100441DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7918673PMC
April 2021

Malignant triton tumour (MTT) of the lung with metastasis to the proximal femur.

BMJ Case Rep 2021 Feb 4;14(2). Epub 2021 Feb 4.

Medical Oncology, Cork University Hospital Group, Cork, Ireland.

A 65-year-old female patient has a history of malignant triton tumour of the right upper lobe of the lung. She underwent right upper lobectomy and lymphadenectomy in May 2018. She presented in November 2019 with pathological fracture of the left proximal femur. It was not associated with neurofibromatosis. We decided to do an excisional biopsy of the mass and proximal femoral replacement followed by radiotherapy. Four months later, she presented with local recurrence. We organised a multidisciplinary team between the orthopaedic, histopathology and oncology teams. Then, we decided to treat her with chemotherapy. After 2 months of follow-up, she responded well to the chemotherapy with no further deterioration of her condition.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2020-237086DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7868192PMC
February 2021

Anaesthetic management of a patient with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis for internal fixation of a fractured femur.

BMJ Case Rep 2021 Jan 8;14(1). Epub 2021 Jan 8.

Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland.

Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA) is a rare disease with an estimated annual incidence of 0.5-6.8 per million. It is characterised by necrotising vasculitis with multiorgan eosinophilic infiltration. Pulmonary manifestations are the most common presentation of EGPA, and cardiac complications are the most common cause of death. Anaesthetic management of EGPA is challenging due to perioperative pulmonary complications, multiorgan involvement and greater risk of cholinesterase enzyme deficiency. We are reporting the anaesthetic management of a 58-year-old woman, diagnosed with EGPA 3 years ago, who underwent urgent intramedullary nail insertion for a femur fracture. The anaesthetic technique comprised femoral nerve block and spinal anaesthesia, thereby avoiding (1) the need for upper airway manipulation, (2) potential adverse effects of anticholinesterase drugs (for reversal of neuromuscular blockade) and (3) histamine release associated with morphine administration perioperatively. Surgery and anaesthesia were uneventful.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2020-239052DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7798413PMC
January 2021
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