Publications by authors named "Hans-Peter Horny"

137 Publications

Selecting the Right Criteria and Proper Classification to Diagnose Mast Cell Activation Syndromes: A Critical Review.

J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2021 Jun 22. Epub 2021 Jun 22.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Va.

In recent years, knowledge about mechanisms underlying mast cell activation (MCA) and accumulation in various pathologic conditions increased substantially. In addition, criteria and a classification of MCA syndromes (MCASs) have been set forth. MCAS is defined by typical clinical symptoms, a substantial increase in serum tryptase level during an attack over the patient's baseline tryptase, and a response of the symptoms to drugs targeting mast cells, mediator production, and/or mediator effects. Alternative diagnostic criteria of MCAS have also been suggested, but these alternative criteria often lack specificity and validation. In this report, we critically review the contemporary literature relating to MCAS and compare the specificity, sensitivity, and strength of MCAS-related parameters within proposals to diagnose and classify MCAS and its variants. Furthermore, we highlight the need to apply specific consensus criteria in the evaluation and classification of MCAS in individual patients. This is an urgent and important medical necessity because as an increasing number of patients are being given a misdiagnosis of MCAS based on nonspecific criteria, which contributes to confusion and frustration by patients and caregivers and sometimes may delay recognition and treatment of correct medical conditions that often turn out to be unrelated to MCA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2021.06.011DOI Listing
June 2021

Case report of a clinically indolent but morphologically high-grade cutaneous mast cell tumor in an adult: Atypical cutaneous mastocytoma or mast cell sarcoma?

J Cutan Pathol 2021 Jun 21. Epub 2021 Jun 21.

Department of Pathology and Medical Biology, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

We present a case of an adult male with a solitary mast cell tumor of the skin with unusual nuclear pleomorphism and mitotic activity. The tumor was excised, recurred within 2 years, was reexcised after 4 years and did not recur >6 years after diagnosis. The tumor showed progressive cytonuclear atypia and a high mitotic and proliferation rate by Ki67-staining from the onset. No KIT mutations were identified in the tumor and bone marrow. Serum tryptase levels and a bone marrow aspirate and trephine biopsy were normal. Although the histomorphology of the skin tumor was consistent with mast cell sarcoma, the clinical behavior without systemic progression argued against this diagnosis. The tumor was finally considered as atypical mastocytoma, borderline to mast cell sarcoma. Currently, the patient is in close follow-up and still in complete remission.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cup.14088DOI Listing
June 2021

Clinical and histopathological features of myeloid neoplasms with concurrent Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) V617F and KIT proto-oncogene, receptor tyrosine kinase (KIT) D816V mutations.

Br J Haematol 2021 Jul 1;194(2):344-354. Epub 2021 Jun 1.

Haematology and Oncology, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.

We report on 45 patients with myeloid neoplasms and concurrent Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) V617F and KIT proto-oncogene, receptor tyrosine kinase (KIT) D816V (JAK2 /KIT ) mutations, which are individually identified in >60% of patients with classical myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) and >90% of patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM) respectively. In SM, the concurrent presence of a clonal non-mast cell neoplasm [SM with associated haematological neoplasm (SM-AHN)] usually constitutes a distinct subtype associated with poor survival. All 45 patients presented with a heterogeneous combination of clinical/morphological features typical of the individual disorders (e.g. leuco-/erythro-/thrombocytosis and elevated lactate dehydrogenase for MPN; elevated serum tryptase and alkaline phosphatase for SM). Overlapping features identified in 70% of patients included splenomegaly, cytopenia(s), bone marrow fibrosis and additional somatic mutations. Molecular dissection revealed discordant development of variant allele frequency for both mutations and absence of concurrently positive single-cell derived colonies, indicating disease evolution in two independent clones rather than monoclonal disease in >60% of patients examined. Overall survival of JAK2 /KIT patients without additional somatic high-risk mutations [HRM, e.g. in serine and arginine-rich splicing factor 2 (SRSF2), additional sex combs like-1 (ASXL1) or Runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1)] at 5 years was 77%, indicating that the mutual impact of JAK2 V617F and KIT D816V on prognosis is fundamentally different from the adverse impact of additional HRM in the individual disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjh.17567DOI Listing
July 2021

Eosinophils and eosinophil-associated disorders: immunological, clinical, and molecular complexity.

Semin Immunopathol 2021 Jun 30;43(3):423-438. Epub 2021 May 30.

Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA.

Eosinophils and their mediators play a crucial role in various reactive states such as bacterial and viral infections, chronic inflammatory disorders, and certain hematologic malignancies. Depending on the underlying pathology, molecular defect(s), and the cytokine- and mediator-cascades involved, peripheral blood and tissue hypereosinophilia (HE) may develop and may lead to organ dysfunction or even organ damage which usually leads to the diagnosis of a HE syndrome (HES). In some of these patients, the etiology and impact of HE remain unclear. These patients are diagnosed with idiopathic HE. In other patients, HES is diagnosed but the etiology remains unknown - these patients are classified as idiopathic HES. For patients with HES, early therapeutic application of agents reducing eosinophil counts is usually effective in avoiding irreversible organ damage. Therefore, it is important to systematically explore various diagnostic markers and to correctly identify the disease elicitors and etiology. Depending on the presence and type of underlying disease, HES are classified into primary (clonal) HES, reactive HES, and idiopathic HES. In most of these patients, effective therapies can be administered. The current article provides an overview of the pathogenesis of eosinophil-associated disorders, with special emphasis on the molecular, immunological, and clinical complexity of HE and HES. In addition, diagnostic criteria and the classification of eosinophil disorders are reviewed in light of new developments in the field.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-021-00863-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8164832PMC
June 2021

Secondary cytogenetic abnormalities in core-binding factor AML harboring inv(16) vs t(8;21).

Blood Adv 2021 05;5(10):2481-2489

Adult Bone Marrow Transplant Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY.

Patients with core-binding factor (CBF) acute myeloid leukemia (AML), caused by either t(8;21)(q22;q22) or inv(16)(p13q22)/t(16;16)(p13;q22), have higher complete remission rates and longer survival than patients with other subtypes of AML. However, ∼40% of patients relapse, and the literature suggests that patients with inv(16) fare differently from those with t(8;21). We retrospectively analyzed 537 patients with CBF-AML, focusing on additional cytogenetic aberrations to examine their impact on clinical outcomes. Trisomies of chromosomes 8, 21, or 22 were significantly more common in patients with inv(16)/t(16;16): 16% vs 7%, 6% vs 0%, and 17% vs 0%, respectively. In contrast, del(9q) and loss of a sex chromosome were more frequent in patients with t(8;21): 15% vs 0.4% for del(9q), 37% vs 0% for loss of X in females, and 44% vs 5% for loss of Y in males. Hyperdiploidy was more frequent in patients with inv(16) (25% vs 9%, whereas hypodiploidy was more frequent in patients with t(8;21) (37% vs 3%. In multivariable analyses (adjusted for age, white blood counts at diagnosis, and KIT mutation status), trisomy 8 was associated with improved overall survival (OS) in inv(16), whereas the presence of other chromosomal abnormalities (not trisomy 8) was associated with decreased OS. In patients with t(8;21), hypodiploidy was associated with improved disease-free survival; hyperdiploidy and del(9q) were associated with improved OS. KIT mutation (either positive or not tested, compared with negative) conferred poor prognoses in univariate analysis only in patients with t(8;21).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2020003605DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8152510PMC
May 2021

COVID-19 Vaccination in Mastocytosis: Recommendations of the European Competence Network on Mastocytosis (ECNM) and American Initiative in Mast Cell Diseases (AIM).

J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2021 06 5;9(6):2139-2144. Epub 2021 Apr 5.

Department of Hematological Biology, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris Sorbonne University, Paris, France.

Mastocytosis is a neoplasm characterized by an accumulation of mast cells in various organs and increased risk for severe anaphylaxis in patients with concomitant allergies. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a pandemic that is associated with a relatively high rate of severe lung disease and mortality. The mortality is particularly high in those with certain comorbidities and increases with age. Recently, several companies have developed an effective vaccination against COVID-19. Although the reported frequency of severe side effects is low, there is an emerging discussion about the safety of COVID-19 vaccination in patients with severe allergies and mastocytosis. However, even in these patients, severe adverse reactions are rare. We therefore recommend the broad use of COVID-19 vaccination in patients with mastocytosis on a global basis. The only well-established exception is a known or suspected allergy against a constituent of the vaccine. Safety measures, including premedication and postvaccination observation, should be considered in all patients with mastocytosis, depending on the individual personal risk and overall situation in each case. The current article provides a summary of published data, observations, and expert opinion that form the basis of these recommendations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2021.03.041DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8019658PMC
June 2021

Proceedings from the Inaugural American Initiative in Mast Cell Diseases (AIM) Investigator Conference.

J Allergy Clin Immunol 2021 Jun 11;147(6):2043-2052. Epub 2021 Mar 11.

Division of Allergy and Immunology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich.

The American Initiative in Mast Cell Diseases (AIM) held its inaugural investigator conference at Stanford University School of Medicine in May 2019. The overarching goal of this meeting was to establish a Pan-American organization of physicians and scientists with multidisciplinary expertise in mast cell disease. To serve this unmet need, AIM envisions a network where basic, translational, and clinical researchers could establish collaborations with both academia and biopharma to support the development of new diagnostic methods, enhanced understanding of the biology of mast cells in human health and disease, and the testing of novel therapies. In these AIM proceedings, we highlight selected topics relevant to mast cell biology and provide updates regarding the recently described hereditary alpha-tryptasemia. In addition, we discuss the evaluation and treatment of mast cell activation (syndromes), allergy and anaphylaxis in mast cell disorders, and the clinical and biologic heterogeneity of the more indolent forms of mastocytosis. Because mast cell disorders are relatively rare, AIM hopes to achieve a coordination of scientific efforts not only in the Americas but also in Europe by collaborating with the well-established European Competence Network on Mastocytosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2021.03.008DOI Listing
June 2021

Eosinophilia/Hypereosinophilia in the Setting of Reactive and Idiopathic Causes, Well-Defined Myeloid or Lymphoid Leukemias, or Germline Disorders.

Am J Clin Pathol 2021 02;155(2):179-210

Division of Hematopathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

Objectives: To report the findings of the 2019 Society for Hematopathology/European Association for Haematopathology Workshop within the categories of reactive eosinophilia, hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES), germline disorders with eosinophilia (GDE), and myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms associated with eosinophilia (excluding entities covered by other studies in this series).

Methods: The workshop panel reviewed 109 cases, assigned consensus diagnosis, and created diagnosis-specific sessions.

Results: The most frequent diagnosis was reactive eosinophilia (35), followed by acute leukemia (24). Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) received 17 submissions, including chronic eosinophilic leukemia, not otherwise specified (CEL, NOS). Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), MDS/MPN, and therapy-related myeloid neoplasms received 11, while GDE and HES received 12 and 11 submissions, respectively.

Conclusions: Hypereosinophilia and HES are defined by specific clinical and laboratory criteria. Eosinophilia is commonly reactive. An acute leukemic onset with eosinophilia may suggest core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia, blast phase of chronic myeloid leukemia, BCR-ABL1-positive leukemia, or t(5;14) B-lymphoblastic leukemia. Eosinophilia is rare in MDS but common in MDS/MPN. CEL, NOS is a clinically aggressive MPN with eosinophilia as the dominant feature. Bone marrow morphology and cytogenetic and/or molecular clonality may distinguish CEL from HES. Molecular testing helps to better subclassify myeloid neoplasms with eosinophilia and to identify patients for targeted treatments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ajcp/aqaa244DOI Listing
February 2021

Myeloid/Lymphoid Neoplasms Associated With Eosinophilia and Rearrangements of PDGFRA, PDGFRB, or FGFR1 or With PCM1-JAK2.

Am J Clin Pathol 2021 02;155(2):160-178

MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX.

Objectives: To summarize cases submitted to the 2019 Society for Hematopathology/European Association for Haematopathology Workshop under the category of myeloid/lymphoid neoplasms with eosinophilia and PDGFRA, PDGFRB, or FGFR1 or with PCM1-JAK2 rearrangements, focusing on recent updates and relevant practice findings.

Methods: The cases were summarized according to their respective gene rearrangement to illustrate the spectrum of clinical, laboratory, and histopathology manifestations and to explore the appropriate molecular genetic tests.

Results: Disease presentations were heterogeneous, including myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs), MDS/MPN, acute myeloid leukemia, acute B- or T-lymphoblastic lymphoma/acute lymphoblastic lymphoma (ALL/LBL), or mixed-lineage neoplasms. Frequent extramedullary involvement occurred. Eosinophilia was common but not invariably present. With the advancement of RNA sequencing, cryptic rearrangements were recognized in genes other than PDGFRA. Additional somatic mutations were more frequent in the FGFR1-rearranged cases. Cases with B-ALL presentations differed from Philadelphia-like B-ALL by the presence of an underlying MPN. Cases with FLT3 and ABL1 rearrangements could be potential candidates for future inclusion in this category.

Conclusions: Accurate diagnosis and classification of this category of myeloid/lymphoid neoplasms has important therapeutic implications. With the large number of submitted cases, we expand our understanding of these rare neoplasms and improve our ability to diagnose these genetically defined disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ajcp/aqaa208DOI Listing
February 2021

Reactive Eosinophil Proliferations in Tissue and the Lymphocytic Variant of Hypereosinophilic Syndrome.

Am J Clin Pathol 2021 02;155(2):211-238

Institute of Pathology and Neuropathology, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Tübingen University Hospital, Tübingen, Germany.

Objectives: The 2019 Society for Hematopathology and European Association for Haematopathology Workshop reviewed the spectrum of neoplastic, nonneoplastic, and borderline entities associated with reactive eosinophilia in tissue.

Methods: The workshop panel reviewed 46 cases covered in 2 workshop sessions.

Results: The 46 cases were presented with their consensus diagnoses during the workshop. Reactive eosinophilia in lymph nodes and other tissues may be accompanied by or be distinct from peripheral blood eosinophilia. Reactive etiologies included inflammatory disorders such as Kimura disease and IgG4-related disease, which may show overlapping pathologic features and reactions to infectious agents and hypersensitivity (covered in a separate review). Hodgkin, T-cell, and B-cell lymphomas and histiocytic neoplasms can result in reactive eosinophilia. The spectrum of these diseases is discussed and illustrated through representative cases.

Conclusions: Reactive eosinophilia in lymph nodes and tissues may be related to both nonneoplastic and neoplastic lymphoid proliferations and histiocytic and nonhematolymphoid processes. Understanding the differential diagnosis of reactive eosinophilia and the potential for overlapping clinical and pathologic findings is critical in reaching the correct diagnosis so that patients can be treated appropriately.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ajcp/aqaa227DOI Listing
February 2021

Mastocytosis.

Am J Clin Pathol 2021 02;155(2):239-266

Department of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City.

Objectives: The 2019 Workshop of the Society for Hematopathology/European Association for Haematopathology received and reviewed cases covering the spectrum of mastocytosis and related diseases, including morphologic mimics, focusing on recent updates and relevant findings for pathologists.

Methods: The workshop panel reviewed 99 cases of cutaneous and systemic mastocytosis (SM) and SM and associated hematologic neoplasms (SM-AHN).

Results: Despite a common theme of KIT mutation (particularly D816V), mastocytosis is a heterogeneous neoplasm with a wide variety of presentations. This spectrum, including rare subtypes and extramedullary organ involvement, is discussed and illustrated by representative cases.

Conclusions: In the age of targeted treatment aimed at KIT, the accurate diagnosis and classification of mastocytosis has major implications for therapy and further interventions. Understanding the clinical, pathologic, and genetic findings of mastocytosis is crucial for selecting the proper tests to perform and subsequent arrival at a correct diagnosis in this rare disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ajcp/aqaa183DOI Listing
February 2021

Mast cells as a unique hematopoietic lineage and cell system: From Paul Ehrlich's visions to precision medicine concepts.

Theranostics 2020 29;10(23):10743-10768. Epub 2020 Aug 29.

Departments of Pathology and of Microbiology and Immunology, and the Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy and Asthma Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, USA.

The origin and functions of mast cells (MCs) have been debated since their description by Paul Ehrlich in 1879. MCs have long been considered 'reactive bystanders' and 'amplifiers' in inflammatory processes, allergic reactions, and host responses to infectious diseases. However, knowledge about the origin, phenotypes and functions of MCs has increased substantially over the past 50 years. MCs are now known to be derived from multipotent hematopoietic progenitors, which, through a process of differentiation and maturation, form a unique hematopoietic lineage residing in multiple organs. In particular, MCs are distinguishable from basophils and other hematopoietic cells by their unique phenotype, origin(s), and spectrum of functions, both in innate and adaptive immune responses and in other settings. The concept of a unique MC lineage is further supported by the development of a distinct group of neoplasms, collectively referred to as mastocytosis, in which MC precursors expand as clonal cells. The clinical consequences of the expansion and/or activation of MCs are best established in mastocytosis and in allergic inflammation. However, MCs have also been implicated as important participants in a number of additional pathologic conditions and physiological processes. In this article, we review concepts regarding MC development, factors controlling MC expansion and activation, and some of the fundamental roles MCs may play in both health and disease. We also discuss new concepts for suppressing MC expansion and/or activation using molecularly-targeted drugs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7150/thno.46719DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7482799PMC
May 2021

Risk and management of patients with mastocytosis and MCAS in the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic: Expert opinions.

J Allergy Clin Immunol 2020 08 17;146(2):300-306. Epub 2020 Jun 17.

Division of Allergy, Department of Dermatology, and Department of Biomedicine, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) (caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) pandemic has massively distorted our health care systems and caused catastrophic consequences in our affected communities. The number of victims continues to increase, and patients at risk can only be protected to a degree, because the virulent state may be asymptomatic. Risk factors concerning COVID-19-induced morbidity and mortality include advanced age, an impaired immune system, cardiovascular or pulmonary diseases, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and cancer treated with chemotherapy. Here, we discuss the risk and impact of COVID-19 in patients with mastocytosis and mast cell activation syndromes. Because no published data are yet available, expert opinions are, by necessity, based on case experience and reports from patients. Although the overall risk to acquire the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 may not be elevated in mast cell disease, certain conditions may increase the risk of infected patients to develop severe COVID-19. These factors include certain comorbidities, mast cell activation-related events affecting the cardiovascular or bronchopulmonary system, and chemotherapy or immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, such treatments should be carefully evaluated on a case-by-case basis during a COVID-19 infection. In contrast, other therapies, such as anti-mediator-type drugs, venom immunotherapy, or vitamin D, should be continued. Overall, patients with mast cell disorders should follow the general and local guidelines in the COVID-19 pandemic and advice from their medical provider.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2020.06.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7297685PMC
August 2020

Midostaurin improves quality of life and mediator-related symptoms in advanced systemic mastocytosis.

J Allergy Clin Immunol 2020 08 11;146(2):356-366.e4. Epub 2020 May 11.

University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Hematology, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Background: Advanced systemic mastocytosis (advSM) is characterized by presence of the KIT D816V mutation and pathologic accumulation of neoplastic mast cells (MCs) in various tissues, leading to severe symptoms and organ damage (eg, cytopenias, liver dysfunction, portal hypertension, malabsorption, and weight loss). Treatment with midostaurin, an orally active multikinase/KIT inhibitor now approved for advSM in the United States and the European Union, resulted in a high rate of response accompanied by reduced MC infiltration of the bone marrow and lowered serum tryptase level.

Objective: We aimed to determine whether midostaurin improves health-related quality of life (QOL) and MC mediator-related symptoms in patients with advSM.

Methods: In 116 patients with systemic mastocytosis (89 patients with advSM fulfilling the strict inclusion criteria of the D2201 study [ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00782067]), QOL and symptom burden were assessed during treatment with midostaurin by using the 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) and the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale patient-reported questionnaires, respectively. MC mediator-related symptoms were evaluated by using a specific physician-reported questionnaire.

Results: Over the first 6 cycles of treatment with midostaurin (ie, 6 months), patients experienced significant improvements in total SF-12 and Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale scores, as well as in subscores of each instrument. These improvements were durable during 36 months of follow-up. Similarly, we found substantial improvements (67%-100%) in all MC mediator-related symptoms.

Conclusion: QOL and MC mediator-related symptoms significantly improve with midostaurin treatment in patients with advSM (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier, NCT00782067).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2020.03.044DOI Listing
August 2020

Importance of Adequate Diagnostic Workup for Correct Diagnosis of Advanced Systemic Mastocytosis.

J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2020 10 15;8(9):3121-3127.e1. Epub 2020 May 15.

Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Hospital Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. Electronic address:

Background: Little is known about the epidemiology of advanced systemic mastocytosis (advSM).

Objectives: To investigate epidemiologic features and diagnostic pitfalls of advSM in Germany.

Methods: Therefore, 140 patients from a single German reference center of the European Competence Network on Mastocytosis between 2003 and 2018 were analyzed.

Results: The patients' median age was 68 years (range, 26-86 years), and male versus female ratio was 2:1. An elevated serum tryptase, a KIT D816 mutation, and additional somatic mutations, for example, in SRSF2, ASXL1, or RUNX1, were identified in 95%, 91%, and 74% of patients, respectively. Median overall survival was 3.5 years (range, 0.03-14.3 years; male vs female 2.6 vs 4.2 years; P = .02). Two categories of misdiagnoses were identified in 51 of 140 (36%) patients: First, systemic mastocytosis (SM) was overlooked in 28 of 140 (20%) patients primarily diagnosed with various subtypes of myeloid neoplasms. Second, 23 of 140 (16%) patients were diagnosed with supposed progression from indolent SM to advSM; however, combination of an elevated KIT D816V variant allele frequency in peripheral blood (n = 22), monocytosis (n = 9), eosinophilia (n = 6), and/or mutations in SRSF2, ASXL1, or RUNX1 (n = 10) suggest that distinct signs of potential advSM were overlooked in virtually all patients. Based on locally diagnosed patients in an area of 2.5 million inhabitants, but obviously without considering more, yet unrecognized cases, the incidence and prevalence of advSM is at least 0.8 and 5.2, respectively, per 1 million inhabitants.

Conclusions: Adequate analyses of tryptase levels, bone marrow morphology, and genetics in patients with myeloid neoplasms or SM would help to prevent the significant underdiagnosis of advSM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2020.05.005DOI Listing
October 2020

Response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in myeloid neoplasms associated with PCM1-JAK2, BCR-JAK2 and ETV6-ABL1 fusion genes.

Am J Hematol 2020 07 28;95(7):824-833. Epub 2020 Apr 28.

Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Hospital Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.

We report on 18 patients with myeloid neoplasms and associated tyrosine kinase (TK) fusion genes on treatment with the TK inhibitors (TKI) ruxolitinib (PCM1-JAK2, n = 8; BCR-JAK2, n = 1) and imatinib, nilotinib or dasatinib (ETV6-ABL1, n = 9). On ruxolitinib (median 24 months, range 2-36 months), a complete hematologic response (CHR) and complete cytogenetic response (CCR) was achieved by five of nine and two of nine patients, respectively. However, ruxolitinib was stopped in eight of nine patients because of primary resistance (n = 3), progression (n = 3) or planned allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo SCT, n = 2). At a median of 36 months (range 4-78 months) from diagnosis, five of nine patients are alive: four of six patients after allo SCT and one patient who remains on ruxolitinib. In ETV6-ABL1 positive patients, a durable CHR was achieved by four of nine patients (imatinib with one of five, nilotinib with two of three, dasatinib with one of one). Because of inadequate efficacy (lack of hematological and/or cytogenetic/molecular response), six of nine patients (imatinib, n = 5; nilotinib, n = 1) were switched to nilotinib or dasatinib. At a median of 23 months (range 3-60 months) from diagnosis, five of nine patients are in CCR or complete molecular response (nilotinib, n = 2; dasatinib, n = 2; allo SCT, n = 1) while two of nine patients have died. We conclude that (a) responses on ruxolitinib may only be transient in the majority of JAK2 fusion gene positive patients with allo SCT being an important early treatment option, and (b) nilotinib or dasatinib may be more effective than imatinib to induce durable complete remissions in ETV6-ABL1 positive patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajh.25825DOI Listing
July 2020

Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in a Rare Case of Tonsillar Mast Cell Sarcoma.

Front Oncol 2020 28;10:219. Epub 2020 Feb 28.

Medical Clinic and Policlinic 1, Hematology and Cellular Therapy, University Hospital Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.

Mast cell sarcoma comprises a rare aggressive mast cell neoplasia with histological, clinical, and genetic features distinct from other mast cell neoplasm. Until now, prognosis is still poor due to high rates of progression to mast cell leukemia and failure of conventional chemotherapies. Our here presented first report about successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation leading to remission in a case of tonsillar MCS represents a promising potential curative treatment option for this rare and often fatal disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fonc.2020.00219DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7059127PMC
February 2020

New developments in the field of mastocytosis and mast cell activation syndromes: a summary of the Annual Meeting of the European Competence Network on Mastocytosis (ECNM) 2019.

Leuk Lymphoma 2020 05 26;61(5):1075-1083. Epub 2019 Dec 26.

Department of Internal Medicine I, Division of Hematology & Hemostaseology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Mastocytosis are a group of hematologic neoplasms characterized by an accumulation of atypical mast cells in one or several organs/tissues, often accompanied by mast cell activation. Whereas in children the disease manifestations are mostly limited to the skin, in adults the disease is usually systemic (systemic mastocytosis; SM) and involves the bone marrow and/or other internal organs. Several variants of SM have been defined. Whereas most patients have indolent SM, some patients have advanced SM, which underlines the complexity of SM. In 2002, a European consortium of clinicians and scientists initiated a multidisciplinary, multi-national cooperative network, termed the 'European Competence Network on Mastocytosis' (ECNM), with the aim to improve diagnosis and therapy of patients with mastocytosis and other mast cell activation disorders. Since then, members of the ECNM have organized Annual Meetings in several European countries. The present article provides a summary of advances in the field presented during the 17th Annual ECNM meeting held in Salzburg in October 2019.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10428194.2019.1703974DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7115828PMC
May 2020

MARS: Mutation-Adjusted Risk Score for Advanced Systemic Mastocytosis.

J Clin Oncol 2019 11 11;37(31):2846-2856. Epub 2019 Sep 11.

University Hospital Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.

Purpose: To develop a risk score for patients with advanced systemic mastocytosis (AdvSM) that integrates clinical and mutation characteristics.

Patients And Methods: The study included 383 patients with AdvSM from the German Registry on Disorders of Eosinophils and Mast Cells (training set; n = 231) and several centers for mastocytosis in the United States and Europe, all within the European Competence Network on Mastocytosis (validation set; n = 152). A Cox multivariable model was used to select variables that were predictive of overall survival (OS).

Results: In multivariable analysis, the following risk factors were identified as being associated with OS: age greater than 60 years, anemia (hemoglobin < 10 g/dL), thrombocytopenia (platelets < 100 × 10/L), presence of one high molecular risk gene mutation (ie, in , , and/or ), and presence of two or more high molecular risk gene mutations. By assigning hazard ratio-weighted points to these variables, the following three risk categories were defined: low risk (median OS, not reached), intermediate risk (median OS, 3.9 years; 95% CI, 2.1 to 5.7 years), and high risk (median OS, 1.9 years; 95% CI, 1.3 to 2.6 years; < .001). The mutation-adjusted risk score (MARS) was independent of the WHO classification and was confirmed in the independent validation set. During a median follow-up time of 2.2 years (range, 0 to 23 years), 63 (16%) of 383 patients experienced a leukemic transformation to secondary mast cell leukemia (32%) or secondary acute myeloid leukemia (68%). The MARS was also predictive for leukemia-free survival ( < .001).

Conclusion: The MARS is a validated, five-parameter, WHO-independent prognostic score that defines three risk groups among patients with AdvSM and may improve up-front treatment stratification for these rare hematologic neoplasms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.19.00640DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6823885PMC
November 2019

Proposed diagnostic criteria for classical chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), CMML variants and pre-CMML conditions.

Haematologica 2019 10 2;104(10):1935-1949. Epub 2019 May 2.

Department of Pathology, Hematopathology Unit and James P Wilmot Cancer Institute, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA.

Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a myeloid neoplasm characterized by dysplasia, abnormal production and accumulation of monocytic cells and an elevated risk of transforming into acute leukemia. Over the past two decades, our knowledge about the pathogenesis and molecular mechanisms in CMML has increased substantially. In parallel, better diagnostic criteria and therapeutic strategies have been developed. However, many questions remain regarding prognostication and optimal therapy. In addition, there is a need to define potential pre-phases of CMML and special CMML variants, and to separate these entities from each other and from conditions mimicking CMML. To address these unmet needs, an international consensus group met in a Working Conference in August 2018 and discussed open questions and issues around CMML, its variants, and pre-CMML conditions. The outcomes of this meeting are summarized herein and include diag nostic criteria and a proposed classification of pre-CMML conditions as well as refined minimal diagnostic criteria for classical CMML and special CMML variants, including oligomonocytic CMML and CMML associated with systemic mastocytosis. Moreover, we propose diagnostic standards and tools to distinguish between 'normal', pre-CMML and CMML entities. These criteria and standards should facilitate diagnostic and prognostic evaluations in daily practice and clinical studies in applied hematology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2019.222059DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6886439PMC
October 2019

Clonal Hematopoiesis with Oncogenic Potential (CHOP): Separation from CHIP and Roads to AML.

Int J Mol Sci 2019 Feb 12;20(3). Epub 2019 Feb 12.

Institute of Pathology, Ludwig-Maximilians University, 80539 Munich, Germany.

The development of leukemia is a step-wise process that is associated with molecular diversification and clonal selection of neoplastic stem cells. Depending on the number and combinations of lesions, one or more sub-clones expand/s after a variable latency period. Initial stages may develop early in life or later in adulthood and include premalignant (indolent) stages and the malignant phase, defined by an acute leukemia. We recently proposed a cancer model in which the earliest somatic lesions are often age-related early mutations detectable in apparently healthy individuals and where additional oncogenic mutations will lead to the development of an overt neoplasm that is usually a preleukemic condition such as a myelodysplastic syndrome. These neoplasms may or may not transform to overt acute leukemia over time. Thus, depending on the type and number of somatic mutations, clonal hematopoiesis (CH) can be divided into CH with indeterminate potential (CHIP) and CH with oncogenic potential (CHOP). Whereas CHIP mutations usually create the molecular background of a neoplastic process, CHOP mutations are disease-related or even disease-specific lesions that trigger differentiation and/or proliferation of neoplastic cells. Over time, the acquisition of additional oncogenic events converts preleukemic neoplasms into secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML). In the present article, recent developments in the field are discussed with a focus on CHOP mutations that lead to distinct myeloid neoplasms, their role in disease evolution, and the impact of additional lesions that can drive a preleukemic neoplasm into sAML.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms20030789DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6387423PMC
February 2019

Proposed Diagnostic Algorithm for Patients with Suspected Mast Cell Activation Syndrome.

J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2019 04 5;7(4):1125-1133.e1. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Laboratory of Allergic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md.

Mast cell activation (MCA) accompanies diverse physiologic and pathologic processes and is one of the more frequently encountered conditions in medicine. MCA-related symptoms are usually mild and often transient. In such cases, histamine receptor blockers and other mediator-targeting drugs can usually control MCA. In severe cases, an MCA syndrome (MCAS) may be diagnosed. However, overt MCAS is an unusual condition, and many patients referred because of suspected MCAS are diagnosed with other diseases (autoimmune, neoplastic, or infectious) unrelated to MCA or suffer from MCA-related (eg, allergic) disorders and/or comorbidities without fulfilling criteria of an overt MCAS. These considerations are important as more and more patients are informed that they may have MCA or even MCAS without completing a thorough medical evaluation. In fact, in several instances, symptoms are misinterpreted as MCA/MCAS, and other clinically relevant conditions are not thoroughly pursued. The number of such referrals is increasing. To avoid such unnecessary referrals and to prevent misdiagnoses, we here propose a diagnostic algorithm through which a clinically relevant (systemic) MCA can be suspected and MCAS can subsequently be documented or excluded. In addition, the algorithm proposed should help guide the investigating care providers to consider the 2 principal diagnoses that may underlie MCAS, namely, severe allergy and systemic mastocytosis accompanied by severe MCA. Although validation is required, we anticipate that this algorithm will facilitate the management of patients with suspected MCAS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2019.01.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6643056PMC
April 2019

KIT D816 mutated/CBF-negative acute myeloid leukemia: a poor-risk subtype associated with systemic mastocytosis.

Leukemia 2019 05 11;33(5):1124-1134. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Hospital Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.

KIT D816 mutations (KIT D816) are strongly associated with systemic mastocytosis (SM) but are also detectable in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), where they represent an adverse prognostic factor in combination with core binding factor (CBF) fusion genes. Here, we evaluated the clinical and molecular features of KIT D816/CBF-negative (CBF) AML, a previously uncharacterized combination. All KIT D816/CBF cases (n = 40) had histologically proven SM with associated AML (SM-AML). Molecular analyses revealed at least one additional somatic mutation (median, n = 3) beside KIT D816 (e.g., SRSF2, 38%; ASXL1, 31%; RUNX1, 34%) in 32/32 (100%) patients. Secondary AML evolved in 29/40 (73%) patients from SM ± associated myeloid neoplasm. Longitudinal molecular and cytogenetic analyses revealed the acquisition of new mutations and/or karyotype evolution in 15/16 (94%) patients at the time of SM-AML. Median overall survival (OS) was 5.4 months. A screen of two independent AML databases (AML) revealed remarkable similarities between KIT D816/CBF SM-AML and KIT D816/CBF AML (n = 69) with regard to KIT D816 variant allele frequency, mutation profile, aberrant karyotype, and OS suggesting underlying SM in a significant proportion of AML patients. Bone marrow histology and reclassification as SM-AML has important clinical implications regarding prognosis and potential inclusion of KIT inhibitors in treatment concepts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41375-018-0346-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6756067PMC
May 2019

Core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia with t(8;21): Risk factors and a novel scoring system (I-CBFit).

Cancer Med 2018 09 16;7(9):4447-4455. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

Division of Hematology and HCT, City of Hope, Duarte, California.

Background: Although the prognosis of core-binding factor (CBF) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is better than other subtypes of AML, 30% of patients still relapse and may require allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT). However, there is no validated widely accepted scoring system to predict patient subsets with higher risk of relapse.

Methods: Eleven centers in the US and Europe evaluated 247 patients with t(8;21)(q22;q22).

Results: Complete remission (CR) rate was high (92.7%), yet relapse occurred in 27.1% of patients. A total of 24.7% of patients received alloHCT. The median disease-free (DFS) and overall (OS) survival were 20.8 and 31.2 months, respectively. Age, KIT D816V mutated (11.3%) or nontested (36.4%) compared with KIT D816V wild type (52.5%), high white blood cell counts (WBC), and pseudodiploidy compared with hyper- or hypodiploidy were included in a scoring system (named I-CBFit). DFS rate at 2 years was 76% for patients with a low-risk I-CBFit score compared with 36% for those with a high-risk I-CBFit score (P < 0.0001). Low- vs high-risk OS at 2 years was 89% vs 51% (P < 0.0001).

Conclusions: I-CBFit composed of readily available risk factors can be useful to tailor the therapy of patients, especially for whom alloHCT is not need in CR1 (ie, patients with a low-risk I-CBFit score).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cam4.1733DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6144246PMC
September 2018

Normal and pathological erythropoiesis in adults: from gene regulation to targeted treatment concepts.

Haematologica 2018 10 3;103(10):1593-1603. Epub 2018 Aug 3.

Imagine Institute, INSERM U 1163, CNRS 8654, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne, Paris Cité, France

Pathological erythropoiesis with consequent anemia is a leading cause of symptomatic morbidity in internal medicine. The etiologies of anemia are complex and include reactive as well as neoplastic conditions. Clonal expansion of erythroid cells in the bone marrow may result in peripheral erythrocytosis and polycythemia but can also result in anemia when clonal cells are dysplastic and have a maturation arrest that leads to apoptosis and hinders migration, a constellation typically seen in the myelodysplastic syndromes. Rarely, clonal expansion of immature erythroid blasts results in a clinical picture resembling erythroid leukemia. Although several mechanisms underlying normal and abnormal erythropoiesis and the pathogenesis of related disorders have been deciphered in recent years, little is known about specific markers and targets through which prognosis and therapy could be improved in anemic or polycythemic patients. In order to discuss new markers, targets and novel therapeutic approaches in erythroid disorders and the related pathologies, a workshop was organized in Vienna in April 2017. The outcomes of this workshop are summarized in this review, which includes a discussion of new diagnostic and prognostic markers, the updated WHO classification, and an overview of new drugs used to stimulate or to interfere with erythropoiesis in various neoplastic and reactive conditions. The use and usefulness of established and novel erythropoiesis-stimulating agents for various indications, including myelodysplastic syndromes and other neoplasms, are also discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2018.192518DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6165792PMC
October 2018

The underestimated role of basophils in Ph chronic myeloid leukaemia.

Eur J Clin Invest 2018 Oct 6;48(10):e13000. Epub 2018 Aug 6.

LBPA CNRS UMR8113, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Paris Saclay, Cachan, France.

Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is a hematopoietic neoplasm defined by the chromosome translocation t(9;22) and the related oncogene, BCR-ABL1. In most patients, leukaemic cells can be kept under control using BCR-ABL1-targeting drugs. However, many patients relapse which remains a clinical challenge. In particular, patients with advanced (accelerated or blast phase) CML have a poor prognosis. So far, little is known about molecular and cellular interactions and features that contribute to disease progression and drug resistance in CML. One key prognostic factor at diagnosis is marked basophilia. However, although basophils are well-known multifunctional effector cells, their impact in CML remains uncertain. In this article, we discuss the potential role of basophils as active contributors to disease evolution and progression in CML. In particular, basophils serve as a unique source of inflammatory, angiogenic and fibrogenic molecules, such as vascular endothelial growth factor or hepatocyte growth factor. In addition, basophils provide vasoactive substances, like histamine as well as the cytokine-degrading enzyme dipeptidyl-peptidase IV which may promote stem cell mobilization and the extramedullary spread of stem and progenitor cells. Finally, basophils may produce autocrine growth factors for myeloid cells. Understanding the role of basophils in CML evolution and progression may support the development of more effective treatment concepts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/eci.13000DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6175372PMC
October 2018
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