Publications by authors named "Hanna Lindner"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Urethral involvement is associated with higher mortality and local recurrence in vulvar melanoma: a single institutional experience.

Hum Pathol 2020 10 20;104:1-8. Epub 2020 Jul 20.

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA. Electronic address:

Vulvar malignant melanoma (VMM), although uncommon, comprises 5-10% of all vulvar malignancies. Local control is notoriously poor in VMM with recurrence rates of 30-50% compared with approximately 3% in cutaneous melanomas. We studied clinicopathologic features of 37 women with VMM, after reviewing three decades of clinical follow-up data in our institutional databases. Most patients were Caucasian (n = 35) with an average age at diagnosis of 60.6 years (range 23-83). The most common subtype was mucosal lentiginous melanoma (n = 25). We compared Kaplan-Meier survival curves of 31 patients defined by clinical and microscopic attributes using exact log-rank tests. Younger patients at diagnosis (23-64 years), those with thin melanomas (≤1 mm), and those with Clark's level II or III tumors had better 5-year survival rates than older patients (65-83 years) and those with thick melanomas (>1 mm) and those with Clark's level IV or V (P ≤ 0.05), respectively, by exact log-rank test. Local recurrence of melanoma occurred in 15 patients. Nine patients (24%) had eventual urethral involvement by malignant melanoma, and this feature was associated with significantly shorter survival (P = 0.036). Patients with urethral involvement had shorter median time to death and worse 5-year survival rates. Given that spread to the urethra is common in VMM and urethral recurrence is also associated with mortality, pathology excision specimens should be carefully reviewed with attention to urethral involvement as a potentially important prognostic factor.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.humpath.2020.07.017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7669565PMC
October 2020

Increasing Urologic Care Ratios: Implications of Male Patient Care in Florida.

Am J Mens Health 2018 11 15;12(6):2029-2036. Epub 2016 Aug 15.

3 University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA.

Ongoing trends have revealed an inverse relationship between population growth and the number of practicing urologists in the U.S. per capita, which threatens urologic care accessibility. Furthermore, different regions in the United States may be more negatively impacted due to higher population growth rates. The state of Florida witnessed over a 10% higher growth rate compared with national figures between 2000 and 2015. Coupled with data suggesting that since the 1980s, the number of U.S. urologists per capita has been decreasing, the foreseeable future presents many challenges regarding health equity and accessibility. This secondary analysis aimed to investigate the implications of forecasted urologic care decline within a growing population and how it can contribute to adverse male health outcomes. National- and state-level data were collected to calculate a series of urologic care ratios as defined by the number of urologists compared with population sizes. Analyses revealed that national-level urologic care ratios and prostate cancer incidence rates have a significant positive relationship, lending to the conclusion that with fewer urologists, the number of cases identified will decrease. State-level forecasted models indicated that the urologic care ratio will decrease approximately 30% in Florida from 6.23 per 100,000 in 2010 to 4.39 per 100,000 by the year 2030. As growth in demand for urologic care will increase in the next decade, a dire public health scenario is potentially unfolding. Future implications of undiagnosed prostate cancer due to the lack of access will drive an increase in mortality rates as well as health equity concerns for men.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1557988316664904DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6199425PMC
November 2018