Publications by authors named "Hanna K Ulatowska"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Production and comprehension in aphasia: gains and pitfalls in using macrostructure tasks in Aesop's fables.

Int J Speech Lang Pathol 2013 Dec 30;15(6):634-42. Epub 2013 May 30.

University of Texas at Dallas , Dallas, TX , USA.

Macrostructures provide the global meaning of a text. Using Aesop's fables, the main goal of this study has been to identify the advantages and limitations in using the macrostructure tasks of retell, summary, lesson, and gist as clinical tools in understanding 16 patients with mild-to-moderate aphasia. Results suggest that all of the macrostructure tasks are important in determining the production skills of patients with aphasia. Comprehension, on the other hand, is best determined through the macrostructure tasks of retell and lesson. In addition to the language processing skills of patients with aphasia, macrostructures also provide a cognitive picture of how patients manipulate information from stories (i.e., reducing information, making inferences, and generalizing didactic information). Inherent limitations, however, are seen when interpreting possible reasons why patients with aphasia are unable to perform some of these tasks. Given that the potential gains of using macrostructure tasks outweigh the limitations, this study suggests that macrostructures may have clinical value as a diagnostic tool in understanding the cognitive-linguistic processes of patients with brain injury.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/17549507.2013.794476DOI Listing
December 2013

Personal narratives in aphasia: understanding narrative competence.

Top Stroke Rehabil 2013 Jan-Feb;20(1):36-43

School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Texas, Dallas, TX, USA.

Background: Personal narratives have been suggested as a way for persons post stroke to re-establish their identity. To relate tellable personal stories, narrative competence - along with its building blocks - is essential.

Objective: The objective of this study was to describe narrative competence in persons with mild to moderate aphasia. It addressed the areas of coherence, clarity, temporal-causal structure, and reference in narratives. The study also examined the strategies used (evaluative language) as well as the topics and themes in personal narratives.

Methods: Sixteen individuals with mild to moderate aphasia were asked to relate the story of their stroke and stories of a memorable and a frightening experience. Stories were elicited using a "willing listener" procedure. Responses were analyzed quantitatively in terms of the number of propositions and the instances of temporal-causal sequences, reference, and evaluation. Qualitative analysis was performed to determine the overall coherence and clarity of the narratives.

Results: Narrative competence was present in the majority of participants. Although difficulties with reference were observed, high ratings of narrative coherence and clarity were attributed to sufficient amount of language, preserved temporal-causal sequencing, and the use of strategies (evaluative language).

Conclusions: Narrative competence was exhibited in the personal narratives of individuals with mild to moderate aphasia. In addition to pinpointing essential elements of narrative competence, the use of personal narratives was deemed beneficial for both the clinician, by providing a better understanding of the individual with aphasia, and the individual with aphasia, by providing opportunities for self-disclosure.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1310/tsr2001-36DOI Listing
February 2013

Pragmatics in discourse performance: insights from aphasiology.

Semin Speech Lang 2007 May;28(2):148-58

Callier Center for Communication Disorders, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, TX, USA.

This article examines the preservation of pragmatic abilities of individuals with aphasia, as manifested in the discourse they produce. The construct of coherence is used as a framework for understanding this pragmatic preservation. Discourse coherence is largely derived from the structure, selection, and highlighting of information expressed in a discourse. Personal narratives, as one type of discourse, represent an extended turn-in-conversation on a topic of personal relevance to the speaker, common in everyday life. As such, they provide a valuable source of information about a speaker's pragmatic ability. Examples of personal narratives told by individuals with aphasia are used to illustrate and discuss the means by which discourse coherence is achieved. These include a tightly structured temporal-causal event line, development of theme, and evaluation of information. Possible approaches to clinical assessment are considered, including use of global rating systems.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2007-970572DOI Listing
May 2007

Complementing behavioral measures with electrophysiological measures in diagnostic evaluation: a case study in two languages.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2006 Jun;49(3):603-15

The University of Texas at Dallas, USA.

This case study focuses on a bilingual, older man who spoke Polish and English and showed weaknesses on clinical measures of dichotic listening in English. It was unclear whether these test results were influenced by the participant's facility with his second language or by other nonauditory factors. To elucidate the nature of this deficit, the authors examined behavioral and electrophysiological responses during dichotic-listening tasks involving linguistic processing in both languages. A diotic (control) condition was included to examine whether nonauditory factors, such as language familiarity, memory, or decline in speed of mental processing, might explain the dichotic results. The results from this participant were compared with those obtained from a bilingual young adult who also spoke both Polish and English. Results showed a substantial left-ear deficit for the older individual on both behavioral and electrophysiological measures of dichotic listening. The pattern of results is consistent with previous findings in demonstrating that the left-ear deficit in this patient derived from an auditory-specific defect rather than from any of the extra-auditory factors associated with language facility or cognitive decline.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/1092-4388(2006/043)DOI Listing
June 2006