Publications by authors named "Hanka Dekker"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A generic emergency protocol for patients with inborn errors of metabolism causing fasting intolerance: A retrospective, single-center study and the generation of www.emergencyprotocol.net.

J Inherit Metab Dis 2021 Apr 12. Epub 2021 Apr 12.

Section of Metabolic Diseases, Beatrix Children's Hospital, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Patients with inborn errors of metabolism causing fasting intolerance can experience acute metabolic decompensations. Long-term data on outcomes using emergency letters are lacking. This is a retrospective, observational, single-center study of the use of emergency letters based on a generic emergency protocol in patients with hepatic glycogen storage diseases (GSD) or fatty acid oxidation disorders (FAOD). Data on hospital admissions, initial laboratory results, and serious adverse events were collected. Subsequently, the website www.emergencyprotocol.net was generated in the context of the CONNECT MetabERN eHealth project following multiple meetings, protocol revisions, and translations. Representing 470 emergency protocol years, 127 hospital admissions were documented in 54/128 (42%) patients who made use of emergency letters generated based on the generic emergency protocol. Hypoglycemia (here defined as glucose concentration < 3.9 mmol/L) was reported in only 15% of hospital admissions and was uncommon in patients with ketotic GSD and patients with FAOD aged >5 years. Convulsions, coma, or death was not documented. By providing basic information, emergency letters for individual patients with hepatic GSD or the main FAOD can be generated at www.emergencyprotocol.net, in nine different languages. Generic emergency protocols are safe and easy for home management by the caregivers and the first hour in-hospital management to prevent metabolic emergencies in patients with hepatic GSD and medium-chain Acyl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. The website www.emergencyprotocol.net is designed to support families and healthcare providers to generate personalized emergency letters for patients with hepatic GSD and the main FAOD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jimd.12386DOI Listing
April 2021

Consensus guidelines for the diagnosis and management of pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy due to α-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency.

J Inherit Metab Dis 2021 Jan 1;44(1):178-192. Epub 2020 Dec 1.

Department of Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia.

Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (PDE-ALDH7A1) is an autosomal recessive condition due to a deficiency of α-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, which is a key enzyme in lysine oxidation. PDE-ALDH7A1 is a developmental and epileptic encephalopathy that was historically and empirically treated with pharmacologic doses of pyridoxine. Despite adequate seizure control, most patients with PDE-ALDH7A1 were reported to have developmental delay and intellectual disability. To improve outcome, a lysine-restricted diet and competitive inhibition of lysine transport through the use of pharmacologic doses of arginine have been recommended as an adjunct therapy. These lysine-reduction therapies have resulted in improved biochemical parameters and cognitive development in many but not all patients. The goal of these consensus guidelines is to re-evaluate and update the two previously published recommendations for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients with PDE-ALDH7A1. Members of the International PDE Consortium initiated evidence and consensus-based process to review previous recommendations, new research findings, and relevant clinical aspects of PDE-ALDH7A1. The guideline development group included pediatric neurologists, biochemical geneticists, clinical geneticists, laboratory scientists, and metabolic dieticians representing 29 institutions from 16 countries. Consensus guidelines for the diagnosis and management of patients with PDE-ALDH7A1 are provided.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jimd.12332DOI Listing
January 2021

Registries for orphan drugs: generating evidence or marketing tools?

Orphanet J Rare Dis 2020 09 3;15(1):235. Epub 2020 Sep 3.

Platform Medicine for Society at Amsterdam University Medical Centers, location Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Independent disease registries for pre-and post-approval of novel treatments for rare diseases are increasingly important for healthcare professionals, patients, regulators and the pharmaceutical industry. Current registries for rare diseases to evaluate orphan drugs are mainly set up and owned by the pharmaceutical industry which leads to unacceptable conflicts of interest. To ensure independence from commercial interests, disease registries should be set up and maintained by healthcare professionals and patients. Public funding should be directed towards an early establishment of international registries for orphan diseases, ideally well before novel treatments are introduced. Regulatory bodies should insist on the use of data from independent disease registries rather than company driven, drug-oriented registries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13023-020-01519-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7469301PMC
September 2020

Position statement on the role of healthcare professionals, patient organizations and industry in European Reference Networks.

Orphanet J Rare Dis 2016 Jan 25;11. Epub 2016 Jan 25.

Amsterdam Institute for Social Science Research, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

A call from the EU for the set-up of European Reference Networks (ERNs) is expected to be launched in the first quarter of 2016. ERNs are intended to improve the care for patients with low prevalent or rare diseases throughout the EU by, among other things, facilitating the pooling and exchange of experience and knowledge and the development of protocols and guidelines. In the past, for example where costly orphan drugs have been concerned, industry has played an important role in facilitating consensus meetings and publication of guidelines. The ERNs should provide a unique opportunity for healthcare professionals and patients to lead these activities in an independent way. However, currently costs for networking activities are not to be covered by EU funds and alternative sources of funding are being explored. There is growing concern that any involvement of the industry in the funding of ERNs and their core activities may create a risk of undue influence. To date, the European Commission has not been explicit in how industry will be engaged in ERNs. We believe that public funding and a conflict of interest policy are needed at the level of the ERNs, Centers of Expertise (CEs), healthcare professionals and patient organizations with the aim of maintaining scientific integrity and independence. Specific attention is needed where it concerns the development of clinical practice guidelines. A proposal for a conflict of interest policy is presented, which may support the development of a framework to facilitate collaboration, safeguard professional integrity and to establish and maintain public acceptability and trust among patients, their organizations and the general public.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13023-016-0383-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4727340PMC
January 2016