Publications by authors named "Hanchen Shen"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Metal-Based Aggregation-Induced Emission Theranostic Systems.

ChemMedChem 2021 Nov 27:e202100578. Epub 2021 Nov 27.

Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Branch of Chinese National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction and Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macau Joint Laboratory of Optoelectronic and Magnetic Functional Materials, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China.

Efficient theranostic systems can realize better outcomes in disease treatment because of precise diagnosis and the concomitant effective therapy. Aggregation-induced emission luminogens (AIEgens) are a unique type of organic emitters with intriguing photophysical properties in the aggregate state. Among the AIEgens studied for biomedical applications, so far, metal-based AIE systems have shown great potential in theranostics due to the enhanced multimodal bioimaging ability and therapeutic effect. This research field has been growing rapidly, and many rationally designed systems with promising activities to cancer and other diseases have been reported recently. In this review, we summarized the recent progress of metal-based AIE materials in bioimaging and biological theranostics, and deciphered the pertinent design strategies. We hope that this review can offer new insights into the development of this growing field.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cmdc.202100578DOI Listing
November 2021

Improving glucose and lipids metabolism: drug development based on bile acid related targets.

Cell Stress 2021 Jan 5;5(1):1-18. Epub 2021 Jan 5.

Department of Diabetes Complications and Metabolism, Institute of Diabetes and Metabolism Research Center, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope National Medical Center, 1500 E. Duarte Road, Duarte, CA 91010, USA.

Bariatric surgery is one of the most effective treatment options for severe obesity and its comorbidities. However, it is a major surgery that poses several side effects and risks which impede its clinical use. Therefore, it is urgent to develop alternative safer pharmacological approaches to mimic bariatric surgery. Recent studies suggest that bile acids are key players in mediating the metabolic benefits of bariatric surgery. Bile acids can function as signaling molecules by targeting bile acid nuclear receptors and membrane receptors, like FXR and TGR5 respectively. In addition, the composition of bile acids is regulated by either the hepatic sterol enzymes such as CYP8B1 or the gut microbiome. These bile acid related targets all play important roles in regulating metabolism. Drug development based on these targets could provide new hope for patients without the risks of surgery and at a lower cost. In this review, we summarize the most updated progress on bile acid related targets and development of small molecules as drug candidates based on these targets.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15698/cst2021.01.239DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7784708PMC
January 2021

Fast cooling induced grain-boundary-rich copper oxide for electrocatalytic carbon dioxide reduction to ethanol.

J Colloid Interface Sci 2020 Jun 6;570:375-381. Epub 2020 Mar 6.

Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Chemistry and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200438, China. Electronic address:

Electrochemical CO reduction with rationally designed copper-based electrocatalysts is a promising approach to reduce CO emission and produce value-added products. Grain boundaries and micron-strains inside catalysts have been proposed as active catalytic sites, while the controlled formation of these sites has remained highly challenging. In this work, we developed a strategy of creating high-density grain boundaries and micron-strains inside CuO electrocatalysts by fast cooling with liquid nitrogen. Compared to samples with slower cooling rates, the fast cooled CuO showed clear difference in their crystal domain sizes, micro-strain densities, and the chemisorption capacities of CO and CO. This micro-strain-rich CuO electrocatalyst exhibited a high total current density over 300 mA·cm, and an outstanding Faradaic efficiency for C products (with a majority to ethanol) at -1.0 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode. Our work suggests a facile approach of tuning grain boundaries and micro-strains inside Cu-based electrocatalysts to scale up electrochemical CO reduction for high value-added products.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcis.2020.03.017DOI Listing
June 2020

One-dimensional Nanomaterial Electrocatalysts for CO Fixation.

Chem Asian J 2019 Nov 7;14(22):3969-3980. Epub 2019 Aug 7.

Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Chemistry and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200438, China.

Electroreduction of CO into valuable molecules or fuels is a sustainable pathway for CO reduction as well as energy storage. However, the premature development stage of electrocatalysts with high activity, selectivity, and durability still remains a significant bottleneck that hinders this field. One-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials, including nanorods, nanotubes, nanoribbons, nanowires, and nanofibers, are generally considered as high-activity and stable electromaterials, due to their unique uniform structures, orientated electronic and mass transport, and rigid tolerance to stress variation. During the past several years, 1D nanomaterials and nanostructures have been extensively studied due to their potentials in serving as CO electroreduction catalysts. In this minireview, recent studies and advances in 1D nanomaterials for CO eletroreduction are summarized, from the viewpoints of both computational and experimental aspects. Based on the composition, the 1D nanomaterials are studied in four categories, including metals, transition-metal oxides/nitrides, transition-metal chalcogenides, and carbon-based materials. Different parameters in tuning 1D materials are also summarized and discussed, such as the crystal facets, grain boundaries, heteroatoms doping, additives and the electrochemical tuning effects. Finally, the challenges and prospects in this direction will be discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/asia.201900819DOI Listing
November 2019

Mesoporous tin oxide for electrocatalytic CO reduction.

J Colloid Interface Sci 2018 Dec 20;531:564-569. Epub 2018 Jul 20.

Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200438, China. Electronic address:

The increasing accumulation of CO in the atmosphere has been leading to serious environmental problems. Electrochemical reduction of CO is a potential means of carbon recycling for energy storage and environmental sustainability. However, it is limited by the lack of highly active and selective electrocatalysts. Here we demonstrate the development of mesoporous tin oxide (SnO) for electrocatalytic CO reduction, which facilitates the adsorption and electrochemical reduction of CO inside mesopores. The highly-ordered and uniform pore sizes of the mesoporous SnO electrocatalyst favor the enhancement of formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and formate during the electrochemical reduction. The combined faradaic efficiencies of CO and formate reach a peak value of ∼80% at a current density of 5 mA cm at -0.8 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode. This work suggests attractive development of mesoporous electrocatalysts with a variety of pore size and structures for efficient energy conversion and electrochemical CO reduction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcis.2018.07.066DOI Listing
December 2018
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